. .
Deutsch
Deutschland
Anmelden
Tipp von eurobuch.com
Ähnliche Bücher
Weitere, andere Bücher, die diesem Buch sehr ähnlich sein könnten:
Buch verkaufen
Anbieter, die das Buch mit der ISBN 160473552X ankaufen:
Suchtools
Buchtipps
Aktuelles
FILTER
- 0 Ergebnisse
Kleinster Preis: 25,95 €, größter Preis: 45,53 €, Mittelwert: 32,16 €
The Lytle-Tate Letters: The Correspondence of Andrew Lytle and Allen Tate - Herausgeber: Young, Thomas Daniel Sarcone, Elizabeth
Vergriffenes Buch, derzeit bei uns nicht verfügbar.
(*)
Herausgeber: Young, Thomas Daniel Sarcone, Elizabeth:
The Lytle-Tate Letters: The Correspondence of Andrew Lytle and Allen Tate - Taschenbuch

ISBN: 9781604735529

[ED: Taschenbuch], [PU: UNIV PR OF MISSISSIPPI], The Lytle-Tate Letters: The Correspondence of Andrew Lytle and Allen Tate edited by Thomas Daniel Young and Elizabeth Sarcone This is a remarkable collection of letters covering nearly four decades of correspondence between two of the American South's foremost literary figures. The series begins in 1927 when Tate invited Lytle, who was then a student at the Yale School of Drama, to visit him at his apartment at 27 Bank Street in New York. Although they were acquaintances through their involvement with the Fugitives Movement at Vanderbilt, they had never been close friends because Lytle's association with the group occurred after Tate had left Nashville. But after Lytle's first visit with Tate and his wife Caroline Gordon, both the friendship and the correspondence grew. The letters in this long sequence of exchanges take on a different content and character during each of the decades of the correspondence. The early letters, between 1927 and 1939, show the development of the Lytle-Tate relationship through their common bond-their love for the South. These letters discuss plans for writing their southern biographies, the two Agrarian symposia-I'll Take My Stand (1930) and Who Owns America? (1936)-as well as Lytle's first novel, The Long Night (1936) and Tate's work on his novel, The Fathers. Although the letters of the forties deal with such basic questions as where each man should live and how he should support himself while he writes, their primary focus is first with Lytle's and then with Tate's editorship of The Sewanee Review. The letters of the fifties are by far the most valuable for literary commentary. In these Lytle reads and critiques many of Tate's essays and poems, and Tate, in turn, reads and responds to Lytle's plans for the novel he was to be so long in writing, The Velvet Horn. Although many letters in the final group-those of the sixties-are devoted to a discussion of Tate's guest editing of the special T.S. Eliot issue of The Sewanee Review, these are also the letters which reveal the depth of the Lytle-Tate friendship. In these they share their personal problems and advise each other in the difficulties each is forced to face. Tate gives support to Lytle during the long illness and subsequent loss of his wife Edna and, later, during Lytle's own bout with cancer. Similarly, Lytle sees Tate through his divorce from his second wife and into his next marriage. After a short time, Lytle brings consolation in the loss of one of the Tates' infant twin sons. The correspondence between Tate and Lytle documents the evolution of a long personal and literary friendship between two men who helped shape a large part of modern southern literature. Thomas Daniel Young (deceased) was Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Professor of English Emeritus at Vanderbilt University. Elizabeth Sarcone is a professor of English at Delta State University. Versandfertig in über 4 Wochen, [SC: 0.00], Neuware, gewerbliches Angebot

Neues Buch Booklooker.de
buecher.de GmbH & Co. KG
Versandkosten:Versandkostenfrei, Versand nach Deutschland (EUR 0.00)
Details...
(*) Derzeit vergriffen bedeutet, dass dieser Titel momentan auf keiner der angeschlossenen Plattform verfügbar ist.
The Lytle-Tate Letters: The Correspondence of Andrew Lytle and Allen Tate - Herausgeber: Young, Thomas Daniel Sarcone, Elizabeth
Vergriffenes Buch, derzeit bei uns nicht verfügbar.
(*)
Herausgeber: Young, Thomas Daniel Sarcone, Elizabeth:
The Lytle-Tate Letters: The Correspondence of Andrew Lytle and Allen Tate - Taschenbuch

ISBN: 9781604735529

[ED: Taschenbuch], [PU: UNIV PR OF MISSISSIPPI], The Lytle-Tate Letters: The Correspondence of Andrew Lytle and Allen Tate edited by Thomas Daniel Young and Elizabeth Sarcone This is a remarkable collection of letters covering nearly four decades of correspondence between two of the American South's foremost literary figures. The series begins in 1927 when Tate invited Lytle, who was then a student at the Yale School of Drama, to visit him at his apartment at 27 Bank Street in New York. Although they were acquaintances through their involvement with the Fugitives Movement at Vanderbilt, they had never been close friends because Lytle's association with the group occurred after Tate had left Nashville. But after Lytle's first visit with Tate and his wife Caroline Gordon, both the friendship and the correspondence grew. The letters in this long sequence of exchanges take on a different content and character during each of the decades of the correspondence. The early letters, between 1927 and 1939, show the development of the Lytle-Tate relationship through their common bond-their love for the South. These letters discuss plans for writing their southern biographies, the two Agrarian symposia-I'll Take My Stand (1930) and Who Owns America? (1936)-as well as Lytle's first novel, The Long Night (1936) and Tate's work on his novel, The Fathers. Although the letters of the forties deal with such basic questions as where each man should live and how he should support himself while he writes, their primary focus is first with Lytle's and then with Tate's editorship of The Sewanee Review. The letters of the fifties are by far the most valuable for literary commentary. In these Lytle reads and critiques many of Tate's essays and poems, and Tate, in turn, reads and responds to Lytle's plans for the novel he was to be so long in writing, The Velvet Horn. Although many letters in the final group-those of the sixties-are devoted to a discussion of Tate's guest editing of the special T.S. Eliot issue of The Sewanee Review, these are also the letters which reveal the depth of the Lytle-Tate friendship. In these they share their personal problems and advise each other in the difficulties each is forced to face. Tate gives support to Lytle during the long illness and subsequent loss of his wife Edna and, later, during Lytle's own bout with cancer. Similarly, Lytle sees Tate through his divorce from his second wife and into his next marriage. After a short time, Lytle brings consolation in the loss of one of the Tates' infant twin sons. The correspondence between Tate and Lytle documents the evolution of a long personal and literary friendship between two men who helped shape a large part of modern southern literature. Thomas Daniel Young (deceased) was Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Professor of English Emeritus at Vanderbilt University. Elizabeth Sarcone is a professor of English at Delta State University.Versandfertig in über 4 Wochen, [SC: 0.00]

Neues Buch Booklooker.de
buecher.de GmbH & Co. KG
Versandkosten:Versandkostenfrei, Versand nach Deutschland (EUR 0.00)
Details...
(*) Derzeit vergriffen bedeutet, dass dieser Titel momentan auf keiner der angeschlossenen Plattform verfügbar ist.
The Lytle-Tate Letters - Herausgeber: Sarcone, Elizabeth Young, Thomas Daniel
Vergriffenes Buch, derzeit bei uns nicht verfügbar.
(*)
Herausgeber: Sarcone, Elizabeth Young, Thomas Daniel:
The Lytle-Tate Letters - Taschenbuch

ISBN: 9781604735529

[ED: Taschenbuch], [PU: University Press of Mississippi], The Lytle-Tate Letters: The Correspondence of Andrew Lytle and Allen Tate edited by Thomas Daniel Young and Elizabeth Sarcone This is a remarkable collection of letters covering nearly four decades of correspondence between two of the American South's foremost literary figures. The series begins in 1927 when Tate invited Lytle, who was then a student at the Yale School of Drama, to visit him at his apartment at 27 Bank Street in New York. Although they were acquaintances through their involvement with the Fugitives Movement at Vanderbilt, they had never been close friends because Lytle's association with the group occurred after Tate had left Nashville. But after Lytle's first visit with Tate and his wife Caroline Gordon, both the friendship and the correspondence grew. The letters in this long sequence of exchanges take on a different content and character during each of the decades of the correspondence. The early letters, between 1927 and 1939, show the development of the Lytle-Tate relationship through their common bond-their love for the South. These letters discuss plans for writing their southern biographies, the two Agrarian symposia-I'll Take My Stand (1930) and Who Owns America? (1936)-as well as Lytle's first novel, The Long Night (1936) and Tate's work on his novel, The Fathers. Although the letters of the forties deal with such basic questions as where each man should live and how he should support himself while he writes, their primary focus is first with Lytle's and then with Tate's editorship of The Sewanee Review. The letters of the fifties are by far the most valuable for literary commentary. In these Lytle reads and critiques many of Tate's essays and poems, and Tate, in turn, reads and responds to Lytle's plans for the novel he was to be so long in writing, The Velvet Horn. Although many letters in the final group-those of the sixties-are devoted to a discussion of Tate's guest editing of the special T.S. Eliot issue of The Sewanee Review, these are also the letters which reveal the depth of the Lytle-Tate friendship. In these they share their personal problems and advise each other in the difficulties each is forced to face. Tate gives support to Lytle during the long illness and subsequent loss of his wife Edna and, later, during Lytle's own bout with cancer. Similarly, Lytle sees Tate through his divorce from his second wife and into his next marriage. After a short time, Lytle brings consolation in the loss of one of the Tates' infant twin sons. The correspondence between Tate and Lytle documents the evolution of a long personal and literary friendship between two men who helped shape a large part of modern southern literature. Thomas Daniel Young (deceased) was Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Professor of English Emeritus at Vanderbilt University. Elizabeth Sarcone is a professor of English at Delta State University.Versandfertig in 3-5 Tagen

Neues Buch Booklooker.de
buecher.de GmbH & Co. KG
Versandkosten:zzgl. Versandkosten
Details...
(*) Derzeit vergriffen bedeutet, dass dieser Titel momentan auf keiner der angeschlossenen Plattform verfügbar ist.
The Lytle-tate Letters: The Correspondence Of Andrew Lytle And Allen Tate
Vergriffenes Buch, derzeit bei uns nicht verfügbar.
(*)
The Lytle-tate Letters: The Correspondence Of Andrew Lytle And Allen Tate - neues Buch

ISBN: 9781604735529

ID: 978160473552

This is a remarkable collection of letters covering nearly four decades of correspondence between two of the South''s foremost literary figures. The series began in 1927 when Tate invited Lytle, who was then a student at the Yale School of Drama, to visit him at his apartment at 27 Bank Street in New York. Although they were acquaintances through their involvement with the Fugitives at Vanderbilt, they had never been close friends because Lytle''s association with the group occurred after Tate had left Nashville. But after Lytle''s visit with Tate and his wife, Caroline Gordon, both the friendship and the correspondence grew. The letters in the long sequence of exchanges took on a different content and character during each of the decades. The early letters, those exchanged between 1927-1939, show the development of Tate and Lytle''s relationship because of what they had in common--love for the South. These letters discuss plans for writing their southern biographies the two Agrarian symposia--I''ll Take My Stand (1930), and Who Owns America? (1936), as well as Lytle''s first novel, The Long Night (1936) and Tate''s work on his novel, The Fathers. Although the letters of the forties deal with such basic questions as where each man should live and how he should support himself while he writes, their primary focus is first with Lytle''s and then with Tate''s editorship of The Sewanee Review. The letters of the fifties are by far the most valuable for literary commentary. In these Lytle reads and critiques many of Tate''s essays and poems, and Tate, in turn, reads and responds to Lytle''s plans for the novel he was to be so long in writing, The Velvet Horn. Although many letters in the final group--those of the sixties--are devoted to a discussion of Tate''s guest editing the special T.S. Eliot issue of The Sewanee Review, these are also the letters which reveal the depth of the Lytle-Tate friendship. In these they share their personal problems and advise each other in the difficulties each is forced to face. Tate supports Lytle during the long illness and subsequent loss of his wife Edna and, later, during Lytle''s own bout with cancer. Similarly, Lytle sees Tate through his divorce from his second wife and into his next marriage. After a short time, Lytle brings consolation in the loss of one of the Tates'' infant twin sons. The correspondence between Tate and Lytle documents the evolution of a long personal and literary relationship between two men who helped shape a large part of modern southern literature. Books, Fiction and Literature, Essays and Letters, The Lytle-tate Letters: The Correspondence Of Andrew Lytle And Allen Tate Books>Fiction and Literature>Essays and Letters, University Press of Mississippi

Neues Buch Indigo.ca
new Free shipping on orders above $25 Versandkosten:zzgl. Versandkosten
Details...
(*) Derzeit vergriffen bedeutet, dass dieser Titel momentan auf keiner der angeschlossenen Plattform verfügbar ist.
The Lytle-Tate Letters: The Correspondence of Andrew Lytle and Allen Tate
Vergriffenes Buch, derzeit bei uns nicht verfügbar.
(*)
The Lytle-Tate Letters: The Correspondence of Andrew Lytle and Allen Tate - Taschenbuch

ISBN: 9781604735529

ID: 597732940

University Press of Mississippi. Paperback. New. Paperback. 450 pages. Dimensions: 9.0in. x 6.0in. x 1.0in.This is a remarkable collection of letters covering nearly four decades of correspondence between two of the Souths foremost literary figures. The series began in 1927 when Tate invited Lytle, who was then a student at the Yale School of Drama, to visit him at his apartment at 27 Bank Street in New York. Although they were acquaintances through their involvement with the Fugitives at Vanderbilt, they had never been close friends because Lytles association with the group occurred after Tate had left Nashville. But after Lytles visit with Tate and his wife, Caroline Gordon, both the friendship and the correspondence grew. The letters in the long sequence of exchanges took on a different content and character during each of the decades. The early letters, those exchanged between 1927-1939, show the development of Tate and Lytles relationship because of what they had in common--love for the South. These letters discuss plans for writing their southern biographies the two Agrarian symposia--Ill Take My Stand (1930), and Who Owns America (1936), as well as Lytles first novel, The Long Night (1936) and Tates work on his novel, The Fathers. Although the letters of the forties deal with such basic questions as where each man should live and how he should support himself while he writes, their primary focus is first with Lytles and then with Tates editorship of The Sewanee Review. The letters of the fifties are by far the most valuable for literary commentary. In these Lytle reads and critiques many of Tates essays and poems, and Tate, in turn, reads and responds to Lytles plans for the novel he was to be so long in writing, The Velvet Horn. Although many letters in the final group--those of the sixties--are devoted to a discussion of Tates guest editing the special T. S. Eliot issue of The Sewanee Review, these are also the letters which reveal the depth of the Lytle-Tate friendship. In these they share their personal problems and advise each other in the difficulties each is forced to face. Tate supports Lytle during the long illness and subsequent loss of his wife Edna and, later, during Lytles own bout with cancer. Similarly, Lytle sees Tate through his divorce from his second wife and into his next marriage. After a short time, Lytle brings consolation in the loss of one of the Tates infant twin sons. The correspondence between Tate and Lytle documents the evolution of a long personal and literary relationship between two men who helped shape a large part of modern southern literature. This item ships from multiple locations. Your book may arrive from Roseburg,OR, La Vergne,TN., University Press of Mississippi

gebrauchtes bzw. antiquarisches Buch Biblio.com
BuySomeBooks
Versandkosten: EUR 11.34
Details...
(*) Derzeit vergriffen bedeutet, dass dieser Titel momentan auf keiner der angeschlossenen Plattform verfügbar ist.

Details zum Buch
The Lytle-Tate Letters: The Correspondence of Andrew Lytle and Allen Tate

A remarkable collection of letters covering nearly four decades of correspondence between two of the South's foremost literary figures

Detailangaben zum Buch - The Lytle-Tate Letters: The Correspondence of Andrew Lytle and Allen Tate


EAN (ISBN-13): 9781604735529
ISBN (ISBN-10): 160473552X
Taschenbuch
Erscheinungsjahr: 2010
Herausgeber: UNIV PR OF MISSISSIPPI
450 Seiten
Gewicht: 0,630 kg
Sprache: eng/Englisch

Buch in der Datenbank seit 07.11.2011 01:53:59
Buch zuletzt gefunden am 22.05.2017 13:57:33
ISBN/EAN: 160473552X

ISBN - alternative Schreibweisen:
1-60473-552-X, 978-1-60473-552-9


< zum Archiv...
Benachbarte Bücher