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Planning for Employment - Anon
Vergriffenes Buch, derzeit bei uns nicht verfügbar.
(*)
Anon:
Planning for Employment - Taschenbuch

2007, ISBN: 1406745189, Lieferbar binnen 4-6 Wochen Versandkosten:Versandkostenfrei innerhalb der BRD

ID: 9781406745184

Internationaler Buchtitel. In englischer Sprache. Verlag: DODO PR, 108 Seiten, L=216mm, B=140mm, H=7mm, Gew.=145gr, [GR: 27830 - TB/Volkswirtschaft], [SW: - Business / Economics / Finance], Kartoniert/Broschiert, Klappentext: PLANNING FOR EMPLOYMENT PLANNING FOR EMPLOYMENT A PRELIMINARY STUDY BY SOME MEMBERS Of PARLIAMENT LONDON MACMIIJ. AN GO. LTD 1935 CONTENTS PAGE INTRODUCTION ..... vii SECTION PARA. I. AN INDUSTRIAL POLICY . . 1-15 i IL THE FIRST STAGE AN ENABLING BILL 16-26 14 III. INDUSTRIAL RECONSTRUCTION . 27-52 25 IV. THE MACHINERY OF GOVERNMENT . 53-57 59 V. THE SOCIAL ASPECT . . . 58-70 69 VI. CONCLUSION . . . .71 84 Appendix I. INDUSTRIAL REORGANISATION ENABLING BILL ... 87 Appendix II. EMPLOYMENT AND EDUCATION OF YOUNG PERSONS BILL . . 93 INTRODUCTION Two years ago a group of supporters of the National Government in the House of Commons set themselves to answer a question, which was even then obvious enough, and which has since become more and more pressing. The question in effect was Is the National Government to be regarded merely as a temporary union of emer gency caretakers, and, if not, what general line of policy is it to represent when the emergency has passed Their general answer to that question corresponds to-day very closely with what seems to be the trend of feeling both in the House of Commons and among the general public. That feeling may, perhaps, roughly be stated as follows. No government in these days can be regarded as a government of caretakers, for, though certain acute phases of the state of emergency in which we live may be regarded as temporary, the emergency itself is nothing less than a transition from one era to another. Certain factors in the economic, and therefore in the social, life of the world have changed. The change may be variously stated. There are many different estimates of the relative value to be attached to this or that change. But, broadly speaking, arestoration of the economic conditions of the nineteenth century or of the first viii PLANNING FOR EMPLOYMENT decade of the twentieth century is impossible. Governments and different schools of political thought must adjust their policy to new tendencies precisely as a hundred years ago governments and parties had to readjust themselves to the con sequences of the industrial revolution. A National Government is the appropriate instrument for a readjustment of this kind. In one sense, a readjustment of this kind involves planning, because it involves a deliberate change of view. But, in another sense, a period of transition is a moving battle in which it is essential that the strategist should preserve his freedom of movement and not tie himself irrevocably to one particular line of advance. For instance, the present trend of economic forces may be towards a closer integration of certain basic industries, but there is also an unmistakable trend in certain fields towards great individualisation of effort. It would be a poor exchange if old rigid party doc trines were to be discarded only to give place to some new rigid doctrine of planning. On the other hand, the strategist, intent on preserving his freedom of movement, must, at any given moment, have a clear idea of his immediate objectives and of the methods by which he proposes, however provisionally, to attain them. What, then, to-day is our immediate objective Clearly, employment. Whatever dreams some people may entertain of a world in which the wealth created by a comparatively small number INTRODUCTION ix of workers may be distributed to all members of society in the form of a social dividend, the first need of our fellow-citizensto-day is opportunity to gain their livelihood by the active production of saleable goods and services. In other words, the planning that is required to-day is planning for employment. It is possible to deny the need for such planning it is also possible to exaggerate its possibilities. One may take the view that, given a sound monetary system and reasonable freedom of trade, the maximum volume of employment will automatically be created. Or one may plunge into an orgy of dictatorial conscription of labour or conscription of employing-power... PLANNING FOR EMPLOYMENT PLANNING FOR EMPLOYMENT A PRELIMINARY STUDY BY SOME MEMBERS Of PARLIAMENT LONDON MACMIIJ. AN GO. LTD 1935 CONTENTS PAGE INTRODUCTION ..... vii SECTION PARA. I. AN INDUSTRIAL POLICY . . 1-15 i IL THE FIRST STAGE AN ENABLING BILL 16-26 14 III. INDUSTRIAL RECONSTRUCTION . 27-52 25 IV. THE MACHINERY OF GOVERNMENT . 53-57 59 V. THE SOCIAL ASPECT . . . 58-70 69 VI. CONCLUSION . . . .71 84 Appendix I. INDUSTRIAL REORGANISATION ENABLING BILL ... 87 Appendix II. EMPLOYMENT AND EDUCATION OF YOUNG PERSONS BILL . . 93 INTRODUCTION Two years ago a group of supporters of the National Government in the House of Commons set themselves to answer a question, which was even then obvious enough, and which has since become more and more pressing. The question in effect was Is the National Government to be regarded merely as a temporary union of emer gency caretakers, and, if not, what general line of policy is it to represent when the emergency has passed Their general answer to that question corresponds to-day very closely with what seems to be the trend of feeling both in the House of Commons and among the general public. That feeling may, perhaps, roughly be stated as follows. No government in these days can be regarded as a government of caretakers, for, though certain acute phases of the state of emergency in which we live may be regarded as temporary, the emergency itself is nothing less than a transition from one era to another. Certain factors in the economic, and therefore in the social, life of the world have changed. The change may be variously stated. There are many different estimates of the relative value to be attached to this or that change. But, broadly speaking, arestoration of the economic conditions of the nineteenth century or of the first viii PLANNING FOR EMPLOYMENT decade of the twentieth century is impossible. Governments and different schools of political thought must adjust their policy to new tendencies precisely as a hundred years ago governments and parties had to readjust themselves to the con sequences of the industrial revolution. A National Government is the appropriate instrument for a readjustment of this kind. In one sense, a readjustment of this kind involves planning, because it involves a deliberate change of view. But, in another sense, a period of transition is a moving battle in which it is essential that the strategist should preserve his freedom of movement and not tie himself irrevocably to one particular line of advance. For instance, the present trend of economic forces may be towards a closer integration of certain basic industries, but there is also an unmistakable trend in certain fields towards great individualisation of effort. It would be a poor exchange if old rigid party doc trines were to be discarded only to give place to some new rigid doctrine of planning. On the other hand, the strategist, intent on preserving his freedom of movement, must, at any given moment, have a clear idea of his immediate objectives and of the methods by which he proposes, however provisionally, to attain them. What, then, to-day is our immediate objective Clearly, employment. Whatever dreams some people may entertain of a world in which the wealth created by a comparatively small number INTRODUCTION ix of workers may be distributed to all members of society in the form of a social dividend, the first need of our fellow-citizensto-day is opportunity to gain their livelihood by the active production of saleable goods and services. In other words, the planning that is required to-day is planning for employment. It is possible to deny the need for such planning it is also possible to exaggerate its possibilities. One may take the view that, given a sound monetary system and reasonable freedom of trade, the maximum volume of employment will automatically be created. Or one may plunge into an orgy of dictatorial conscription of labour or conscription of employing-power...

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Planning for Employment - Anon
Vergriffenes Buch, derzeit bei uns nicht verfügbar.
(*)
Anon:
Planning for Employment - Taschenbuch

2007, ISBN: 1406745189, Lieferbar binnen 4-6 Wochen

ID: 9781406745184

Internationaler Buchtitel. In englischer Sprache. Verlag: DODO PR, 108 Seiten, L=216mm, B=140mm, H=7mm, Gew.=145gr, [GR: 27830 - TB/Volkswirtschaft], [SW: - Business / Economics / Finance], Kartoniert/Broschiert, Klappentext: PLANNING FOR EMPLOYMENT PLANNING FOR EMPLOYMENT A PRELIMINARY STUDY BY SOME MEMBERS Of PARLIAMENT LONDON MACMIIJ. AN GO. LTD 1935 CONTENTS PAGE INTRODUCTION ..... vii SECTION PARA. I. AN INDUSTRIAL POLICY . . 1-15 i IL THE FIRST STAGE AN ENABLING BILL 16-26 14 III. INDUSTRIAL RECONSTRUCTION . 27-52 25 IV. THE MACHINERY OF GOVERNMENT . 53-57 59 V. THE SOCIAL ASPECT . . . 58-70 69 VI. CONCLUSION . . . .71 84 Appendix I. INDUSTRIAL REORGANISATION ENABLING BILL ... 87 Appendix II. EMPLOYMENT AND EDUCATION OF YOUNG PERSONS BILL . . 93 INTRODUCTION Two years ago a group of supporters of the National Government in the House of Commons set themselves to answer a question, which was even then obvious enough, and which has since become more and more pressing. The question in effect was Is the National Government to be regarded merely as a temporary union of emer gency caretakers, and, if not, what general line of policy is it to represent when the emergency has passed Their general answer to that question corresponds to-day very closely with what seems to be the trend of feeling both in the House of Commons and among the general public. That feeling may, perhaps, roughly be stated as follows. No government in these days can be regarded as a government of caretakers, for, though certain acute phases of the state of emergency in which we live may be regarded as temporary, the emergency itself is nothing less than a transition from one era to another. Certain factors in the economic, and therefore in the social, life of the world have changed. The change may be variously stated. There are many different estimates of the relative value to be attached to this or that change. But, broadly speaking, arestoration of the economic conditions of the nineteenth century or of the first viii PLANNING FOR EMPLOYMENT decade of the twentieth century is impossible. Governments and different schools of political thought must adjust their policy to new tendencies precisely as a hundred years ago governments and parties had to readjust themselves to the con sequences of the industrial revolution. A National Government is the appropriate instrument for a readjustment of this kind. In one sense, a readjustment of this kind involves planning, because it involves a deliberate change of view. But, in another sense, a period of transition is a moving battle in which it is essential that the strategist should preserve his freedom of movement and not tie himself irrevocably to one particular line of advance. For instance, the present trend of economic forces may be towards a closer integration of certain basic industries, but there is also an unmistakable trend in certain fields towards great individualisation of effort. It would be a poor exchange if old rigid party doc trines were to be discarded only to give place to some new rigid doctrine of planning. On the other hand, the strategist, intent on preserving his freedom of movement, must, at any given moment, have a clear idea of his immediate objectives and of the methods by which he proposes, however provisionally, to attain them. What, then, to-day is our immediate objective Clearly, employment. Whatever dreams some people may entertain of a world in which the wealth created by a comparatively small number INTRODUCTION ix of workers may be distributed to all members of society in the form of a social dividend, the first need of our fellow-citizensto-day is opportunity to gain their livelihood by the active production of saleable goods and services. In other words, the planning that is required to-day is planning for employment. It is possible to deny the need for such planning it is also possible to exaggerate its possibilities. One may take the view that, given a sound monetary system and reasonable freedom of trade, the maximum volume of employment will automatically be created. Or one may plunge into an orgy of dictatorial conscription of labour or conscription of employing-power...

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(*) Derzeit vergriffen bedeutet, dass dieser Titel momentan auf keiner der angeschlossenen Plattform verfügbar ist.
Planning For Employment - Anon.
Vergriffenes Buch, derzeit bei uns nicht verfügbar.
(*)
Anon.:
Planning For Employment - Taschenbuch

1935, ISBN: 1406745189

ID: 1170667846

[EAN: 9781406745184], Neubuch, [PU: Foreman Press], 1406745189 BRAND NEW *This item is printed on demand.*** , Planning for Employment, Anon, PLANNING FOR EMPLOYMENT PLANNING FOR EMPLOYMENT A PRELIMINARY STUDY BY SOME MEMBERS Of PARLIAMENT LONDON MACMIIJ. AN GO. LTD 1935 CONTENTS PAGE INTRODUCTION . vii SECTION PARA. I. AN INDUSTRIAL POLICY . . 1-15 i IL THE FIRST STAGE AN ENABLING BILL 16-26 14 III. INDUSTRIAL RECONSTRUCTION . 27-52 25 IV. THE MACHINERY OF GOVERNMENT . 53-57 59 V. THE SOCIAL ASPECT . . . 58-70 69 VI. CONCLUSION . . . .71 84 Appendix I. INDUSTRIAL REORGANISATION ENABLING BILL . 87 Appendix II. EMPLOYMENT AND EDUCATION OF YOUNG PERSONS BILL . . 93 INTRODUCTION Two years ago a group of supporters of the National Government in the House of Commons set themselves to answer a question, which was even then obvious enough, and which has since become more and more pressing. The question in effect was Is the National Government to be regarded merely as a temporary union of emer gency caretakers, and, if not, what general line of policy is it to represent when the emergency has passed Their general answer to that question corresponds to-day very closely with what seems to be the trend of feeling both in the House of Commons and among the general public. That feeling may, perhaps, roughly be stated as follows. No government in these days can be regarded as a government of caretakers, for, though certain acute phases of the state of emergency in which we live may be regarded as temporary, the emergency itself is nothing less than a transition from one era to another. Certain factors in the economic, and therefore in the social, life of the world have changed. The change may be variously stated. There are many different estimates of the relative value to be attached to this or that change. But, broadly speaking, arestoration of the economic conditions of the nineteenth century or of the first viii PLANNING FOR EMPLOYMENT decade of the twentieth century is impossible. Governments and different schools of political thought must adjust their policy to new tendencies precisely as a hundred years ago governments and parties had to readjust themselves to the con sequences of the industrial revolution. A National Government is the appropriate instrument for a readjustment of this kind. In one sense, a readjustment of this kind involves planning, because it involves a deliberate change of view. But, in another sense, a period of transition is a moving battle in which it is essential that the strategist should preserve his freedom of movement and not tie himself irrevocably to one particular line of advance. For instance, the present trend of economic forces may be towards a closer integration of certain basic industries, but there is also an unmistakable trend in certain fields towards great individualisation of effort. It would be a poor exchange if old rigid party doc trines were to be discarded only to give place to some new rigid doctrine of planning. On the other hand, the strategist, intent on preserving his freedom of movement, must, at any given moment, have a clear idea of his immediate objectives and of the methods by which he proposes, however provisionally, to attain them. What, then, to-day is our immediate objective Clearly, employment. Whatever dreams some people may entertain of a world in which the wealth created by a comparatively small number INTRODUCTION ix of workers may be distributed to all members of society in the form of a social dividend, the first need of our fellow-citizensto-day is opportunity to gain their livelihood by the active production of saleable goods and services. In other words, the planning that is required to-day is planning for employment. It is possible to deny the need for such planning it is also possible to exaggerate its possibilities. One may take the view that, given a sound monetary system and reasonable freedom of trade, the maximum volume of employment will automatically be created. Or one may plunge into an orgy of dictatorial

Neues Buch Abebooks.de
THE SAINT BOOKSTORE, Southport, MSY, United Kingdom [51194787] [Rating: 5]
NEW BOOK Versandkosten: EUR 5.07
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(*) Derzeit vergriffen bedeutet, dass dieser Titel momentan auf keiner der angeschlossenen Plattform verfügbar ist.
Planning For Employment - Anon.
Vergriffenes Buch, derzeit bei uns nicht verfügbar.
(*)
Anon.:
Planning For Employment - Taschenbuch

1935, ISBN: 1406745189

ID: 1170667846

[EAN: 9781406745184], Neubuch, [PU: Foreman Press], 1406745189 BRAND NEW *This item is printed on demand.*** , Planning for Employment, Anon, PLANNING FOR EMPLOYMENT PLANNING FOR EMPLOYMENT A PRELIMINARY STUDY BY SOME MEMBERS Of PARLIAMENT LONDON MACMIIJ. AN GO. LTD 1935 CONTENTS PAGE INTRODUCTION . vii SECTION PARA. I. AN INDUSTRIAL POLICY . . 1-15 i IL THE FIRST STAGE AN ENABLING BILL 16-26 14 III. INDUSTRIAL RECONSTRUCTION . 27-52 25 IV. THE MACHINERY OF GOVERNMENT . 53-57 59 V. THE SOCIAL ASPECT . . . 58-70 69 VI. CONCLUSION . . . .71 84 Appendix I. INDUSTRIAL REORGANISATION ENABLING BILL . 87 Appendix II. EMPLOYMENT AND EDUCATION OF YOUNG PERSONS BILL . . 93 INTRODUCTION Two years ago a group of supporters of the National Government in the House of Commons set themselves to answer a question, which was even then obvious enough, and which has since become more and more pressing. The question in effect was Is the National Government to be regarded merely as a temporary union of emer gency caretakers, and, if not, what general line of policy is it to represent when the emergency has passed Their general answer to that question corresponds to-day very closely with what seems to be the trend of feeling both in the House of Commons and among the general public. That feeling may, perhaps, roughly be stated as follows. No government in these days can be regarded as a government of caretakers, for, though certain acute phases of the state of emergency in which we live may be regarded as temporary, the emergency itself is nothing less than a transition from one era to another. Certain factors in the economic, and therefore in the social, life of the world have changed. The change may be variously stated. There are many different estimates of the relative value to be attached to this or that change. But, broadly speaking, arestoration of the economic conditions of the nineteenth century or of the first viii PLANNING FOR EMPLOYMENT decade of the twentieth century is impossible. Governments and different schools of political thought must adjust their policy to new tendencies precisely as a hundred years ago governments and parties had to readjust themselves to the con sequences of the industrial revolution. A National Government is the appropriate instrument for a readjustment of this kind. In one sense, a readjustment of this kind involves planning, because it involves a deliberate change of view. But, in another sense, a period of transition is a moving battle in which it is essential that the strategist should preserve his freedom of movement and not tie himself irrevocably to one particular line of advance. For instance, the present trend of economic forces may be towards a closer integration of certain basic industries, but there is also an unmistakable trend in certain fields towards great individualisation of effort. It would be a poor exchange if old rigid party doc trines were to be discarded only to give place to some new rigid doctrine of planning. On the other hand, the strategist, intent on preserving his freedom of movement, must, at any given moment, have a clear idea of his immediate objectives and of the methods by which he proposes, however provisionally, to attain them. What, then, to-day is our immediate objective Clearly, employment. Whatever dreams some people may entertain of a world in which the wealth created by a comparatively small number INTRODUCTION ix of workers may be distributed to all members of society in the form of a social dividend, the first need of our fellow-citizensto-day is opportunity to gain their livelihood by the active production of saleable goods and services. In other words, the planning that is required to-day is planning for employment. It is possible to deny the need for such planning it is also possible to exaggerate its possibilities. One may take the view that, given a sound monetary system and reasonable freedom of trade, the maximum volume of employment will automatically be created. Or one may plunge into an orgy of dictatorial

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NEW BOOK Versandkosten: EUR 5.07
Details...
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Planning for Employment
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PLANNING FOR EMPLOYMENT PLANNING FOR EMPLOYMENT A PRELIMINARY STUDY BY SOME MEMBERS Of PARLIAMENT LONDON MACMIIJ. AN GO. LTD 1935 CONTENTS PAGE INTRODUCTION ..... vii SECTION PARA. I. AN INDUSTRIAL POLICY . . 1-15 i IL THE FIRST STAGE AN ENABLING BILL 16-26 14 III. INDUSTRIAL RECONSTRUCTION . 27-52 25 IV. THE MACHINERY OF GOVERNMENT . 53-57 59 V. THE SOCIAL ASPECT . . . 58-70 69 VI. CONCLUSION . . . .71 84 Appendix I. INDUSTRIAL REORGANISATION ENABLING BILL ... 87 Appendix II. EMPLOYMENT AND EDUCATION OF YOUNG PERSONS BILL . . 93 INTRODUCTION Two years ago a group of supporters of the National Government in the House of Commons set themselves to answer a question, which was even then obvious enough, and which has since become more and more pressing. The question in effect was Is the National Government to be regarded merely as a temporary union of emer gency caretakers, and, if not, what general line of policy is it to represent when the emergency has passed Their general answer to that question corresponds to-day very closely with what seems to be the trend of feeling both in the House of Commons and among the general public. That feeling may, perhaps, roughly be stated as follows. No government in these days can be regarded as a government of caretakers, for, though certain acute phases of the state of emergency in which we live may be regarded as temporary, the emergency itself is nothing less than a transition from one era to another. Certain factors in the economic, and therefore in the social, life of the world have changed. The change may be variously stated. There are many different estimates of the relative value to be attached to this or that change. But, broadly speaking, arestoration of the economic conditions of the nineteenth century or of the first viii PLANNING FOR EMPLOYMENT decade of the twentieth century is impossible. Governments and different schools of political thought must adjust their policy to new tendencies precisely as a hundred years ago governments and parties had to readjust themselves to the con sequences of the industrial revolution. A National Government is the appropriate instrument for a readjustment of this kind. In one sense, a readjustment of this kind involves planning, because it involves a deliberate change of view. But, in another sense, a period of transition is a moving battle in which it is essential that the strategist should preserve his freedom of movement and not tie himself irrevocably to one particular line of advance. For instance, the present trend of economic forces may be towards a closer integration of certain basic industries, but there is also an unmistakable trend in certain fields towards great individualisation of effort. It would be a poor exchange if old rigid party doc trines were to be discarded only to give place to some new rigid doctrine of planning. On the other hand, the strategist, intent on preserving his freedom of movement, must, at any given moment, have a clear idea of his immediate objectives and of the methods by which he proposes, however provisionally, to attain them. What, then, to-day is our immediate objective Clearly, employment. Whatever dreams some people may entertain of a world in which the wealth created by a comparatively small number INTRODUCTION ix of workers may be distributed to all members of society in the form of a social dividend, the first need of our fellow-citizensto-day is opportunity to gain their livelihood by the active production of saleable goods and services. In other words, the planning that is required to-day is planning for employment. It is possible to deny the need for such planning it is also possible to exaggerate its possibilities. One may take the view that, given a sound monetary system and reasonable freedom of trade, the maximum volume of employment will automatically be created. Or one may plunge into an orgy of dictatorial conscription of labour or conscription of employing-power...

Detailangaben zum Buch - Planning for Employment


EAN (ISBN-13): 9781406745184
ISBN (ISBN-10): 1406745189
Taschenbuch
Erscheinungsjahr: 2007
Herausgeber: DODO PR
108 Seiten
Gewicht: 0,145 kg
Sprache: eng/Englisch

Buch in der Datenbank seit 11.11.2007 00:07:57
Buch zuletzt gefunden am 07.10.2010 22:44:07
ISBN/EAN: 1406745189

ISBN - alternative Schreibweisen:
1-4067-4518-9, 978-1-4067-4518-4


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