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Tituba of Salem Village - Petry, Ann
(*)
Petry, Ann:
Tituba of Salem Village - Taschenbuch

2008, ISBN: 9780064404037

ID: 374304205

Avon Books, USA, 2008. Paperback. Very Good. 369 pages. Reading creases to spine. Moderate spine lean. Let the Bastard Games begin. A group of less than noble gentlemen hold a competition pitting their bastard and third born children against one another to determine whose seed is best. The winning son gains a fortune, a title from the king, and a pre-chosen, well-born wife. Sebastien Deville, the bastard son of a duke, is strikingly handsome, jaded and sinful. He coldly recognizes the extraordinary opportunities that winning will give him - power, revenge, sponsorship and the deed to his deceased mother's lands - the only place he has ever felt at home - purchased from under him long ago by his hated father.A consummate bad boy and rake, Sebastien meets a beautiful widow during the competition and puts his best hunting skills to use. What he doesn't expect to find is a woman who chips away at his shields and captures his heart. But the contract for winning is all or nothing. And in the end, he has to choose between the land, power and respect he has always craved, or the woman he has come to love. Quantity Available: 1. Category: Fiction; Romance & Women's Fiction; ISBN/EAN: 9780061579134. Inventory No: 10120008.. 9780061579134, Avon Books, 2008, New York U. S. A.: Dramatists Play Service, Incorporated. Fair 1963. Softcover. Early Acting Ed, no cover w/ full props, presets & scene designs; no names, not marked-in, underscored, clearance or discard. Mails from NYC usually within 12 hours. ; 83 pages; Drama\nFull Length\nCast: 3 men, 5 women: 8 total\nSetting: INTERIOR\n\nA long-run Off-Broadway success. "BEEBEE gets the season off to a fast start…A credit to the theatre…" —NY Journal-American. "A freshness of spirit, an affectionate insight and a sense of the human comedy…" —NY Herald-Tribune. "BEEBEE FENSTERMAKER is a solid intelligent piece of work, full of clear, sustained feeling and informed by an acute sense of what it means to be alive at this moment…" —The Commonweal. \n\nTHE STORY: Richard Gilman describes: "Snyder's heroine is a young, ambitious, romantic girl just out of college and established in her first tiny apartment in some nameless city. She is writing a novel, but when her savings give out she is forced to get a job, hopefully one which 'won't drain her too much' and which will leave her time for her 'creative' work. She of course ends up by working full time and writing in the evenings, but it is generally made clear to her that she really hasn't much literary ability, so she switches to painting, for which she isn't terribly endowed either. Eventually, her hopes and aspirations burned away, she comes to an acceptance of her condition, which includes the inability to create a permanent relationship with a man because of her overwhelming need for absolute union…his departure leads her first to a swift decline, represented by beer cans strewn around the untended apartment and an almost total isolation from the world, and then to a kind of resurrection—the beginning of a fragile, undemanding relationship with a stranger…Snyder has also written a counterbalancing element into his drama: On a platform behind the main stage Beebee's mother and aunts talk about their own lives, the scenes being interspersed with those in which her drama unfolds. " ., Dramatists Play Service, Incorporated, 1963, Rubbed corners, frayed spine ends, bookplate on front pastedown, previous owner's name on edges. No DJ.Lemony Snicket returns with the last book before the last book of his bestselling Series of Unfortunate Events. Scream and run away before the secrets of the series are revealed!Very little is known about Lemony Snicket and A Series of Unfortunate Events. What we do know is contained in the following brief list:o The books have inexplicably sold millions and millions of copies worldwideo People in more than 40 countries are consumed by consuming Snicketo The movie was as sad as the books, if not more soo Like unrefrigerated butter and fungus, the popularity of these books keeps spreadingEven less is known about book the twelfth in this alarming phenomenon. What we do know is contained in the following brief list:o In this book, things only get worseo Count Olaf is still evilo The Baudelaire orphans do not win a contesto The title begins with the word, TheSometimes, ignorance is bliss.353 p., Harper Collins Publishers, 2005, U.S.A: Pinnacle Books, 1978. Paperback. Good. BEGINNING OF AN END...The guy never saw what had come for him. A two-hand chop at either side of the neck sat the guy down and shuttered the eyes without so much as a gasp of understanding. Bolan hoisted the unconscious man to his shoulder and headed for the front door. Throwing the double bolts, he stepped into the little security room that marked the final obstacle. The guard had both feet on the desk, a Schmeisser one lunge away. Both feet crashed to the floor as he tried for it-a mere heart­beat removed from instant fame and glory, but a heartbeat too late. The Beretta spat once from the doorway, chugging its silent skullbuster toward a bone-shattering denial of fame and glory. The guard fell back into the chair and stayed there, the broken head slumped limply over the backrest. The Executioner rolled chair and all into the darkened interior, then got the hell out of there with his prisoner. As he rejoined the night, he knew that it had been a successful mission. But he did not know what lay at the end of the numbers. And he had not yet reached that end. He jogged along with his burden, heading due north and into God knew what. ISBN 0-523-40252-X 12-29-16, Pinnacle Books, 1978, New York, NY, U.S.A.: HarperCollins Publishers, 2002. Mass Market Paperback. Very Good/No Jacket as Issued. New York, NY, U.S.A.: HarperCollins Publishers, 2002. Very Good/No Jacket as Issued. You can't read past the first chapter of Lisa Scottoline's newest legal thriller without mentally casting the actor who might play Pigeon Tony, the charming and totally authentic defendant who's on trial for killing the man who raped and murdered his wife, destroyed his son and daughter-in-law in a staged "accident," and has threatened the life of his grandson. Robert De Niro's too threatening, Joe Mantegna's too young, Marlon Brando's too fat, but somewhere there must be a celluloid counterpart to one of the most delightful antiheroes in recent crime fiction. Meanwhile, this wonderful character study of a man of conscience on trial for a crime of passion will divert and entertain fans of Scottoline's previous novels about Bennie Rosato's high-estrogen Philadelphia law firm (Moment of Truth, Mistaken Identity). When Judy Carrier, one of Bennie's attorneys, takes on Tony's defense, she's faced with a legal and moral dilemma. Tony admits that he killed Angelo Coluzzi, but insists it wasn't murder but vendetta, a justifiable payback for a blood crime committed nearly half a century ago and a continent away. The Coluzzi family knows about vendetta, too--they've got their own payback planned, and the trick for Judy is keeping Pigeon Tony (and herself) alive long enough to get them to trial. There's a complication de coeur when Judy falls in love with Tony's grandson, a hunky stonemason who will do for fences what Robert James Waller did for covered bridges (Clint Eastwood's too old, Brad Pitt's too young, etc.). But all's well that ends well in a tidy little read that will probably earn Scottoline another well-deserved shot at the bestseller list. --Jane Adams --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title. From Publishers Weekly Is it murder or simply eye-for-an-eye justice if you kill someone who has killed members of your family? That moral conundrum lies at the heart of Scottoline's (Moment of Truth; Mistaken Identity) latest legal yarn, which gives top billing to yet another lawyer from the all-female Philadelphia firm of Rosato & Associates. The star here is the somewhat manic Judy Carrier, who has played supporting roles in the past. The story, however, revolves around Anthony "Pigeon Tony" Lucia, a lovable... read more --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title. Book Description Lawyer Judy Carrier takes the case of her career to defend Anthony Lucia, fondly known as "Pigeon Tony," who is arrested for the murder of his lifelong enemy Angelo Coluzzi. When her client freely admits he killed Coluzzi because of a vendetta, Judy's troubles really begin. The Coluzzi family wants revenge. Then there's Pigeon Tony's hunky grandson, who makes Judy think about everything but the law.In a case steeped in blood and memory, it will take brains and a lot of luck to save Pigeon Tony. But if anyone might see justice done, it's this gutsy attorney who'll risk everything to win -- including her own life. 12mo - over 6¾" - 7¾" tall. <br/><br/>, HarperCollins Publishers, 2002, Nashville, TN, U.S.A.: Here's Life Publishers, 1979. Trade Paperback. Very Good/No Jacket as Issued. Nashville, TN, U.S.A.: Here's Life Publishers, 1979. Very Good/No Jacket as Issued. reviews: If you are a truth seeking agnostic or atheist who does not categorically deny the possiblity of the supernatural you should read this book. You should also read this book if you are a Christian who does not know why you believe what you believe. This is the most comprehensive defense of Christianity that I have found.The case it makes is so convincing I was at first "certain" the evidence had to be tainted somehow. But, by using the references given in the footnotes, both for and against the argument, I verified (as can anyone else) that the evidence is presented fairly. This book is very dense and it will take perseverance to follow the argument from beginning to end. However, it is very well divided into individual criticisms which do not depend on the answers given in other areas. I recommend this book highly to everyone who is willing to spend time and thought searching for the truth. A less comprehensive, and perhaps more readable, book covering much of the same material is The Case for Christ by Lee Strobel. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Lets be honest: people will believe WHAT THEY WANT. If you want to believe in Jesus, you will. If you want to believe that either Jesus didn't exist, or he wasn't from God, you will. This book is a great book that is in outline form with clear and precise arguments. It addresses several issues non-believers have with Christianity. It is not the end-all be-all of book, but it's a great start. This book wittles away at the illogical arguments against Christianity and the Bible, but it will only be effective if the reader has an open mind. I didn't give it five stars because it is far from an 'easy,' casual read. It is a great reference book. I also recomend the 'Case for Christ,' 'Case for Creation,' and 'Case for Faith' by Lee Strobel, written with the same sentiments as "Evidence." 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall. <br/><br/>, Here's Life Publishers, 1979, US: Pocket Books. Mass Market Paperback. 0671739727 Book Description Bronwyn MacArran was a proud Scot. Stephen Montgomery was one of the hated English. He came to Scotland as a conqueror, saw her beauty and was vanquished. But still she would abhor him. She owned a temper hot enough to forge the armors of battle or inflame a valiant soldier's passion. Yet still she would resist him. She became his reason to live, his reason to love. And still she would deny him. But while clan fought clan, while brother took up sword against brother, and the highlands ran with blood -- their destiny was made...and this mighty warrior pledged himself to his woman's pride, her honor and her name -- and made of their love a torch to burn through the ages! Editorial Reviews About the Author Jude Deveraux is the author of more than forty New York Times bestsellers, including Moonlight in the Morning, The Scent of Jasmine, Scarlet Nights, Days of Gold, Lavender Morning, Return to Summerhouse, and Secrets. To date, there are more than sixty million copies of her books in print worldwide. To learn more, visit JudeDeveraux.com. Excerpt. ® Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved. Chapter One 1501 Bronwyn MacArran stood at the window of the English manor house, looking down at the courtyard below. The mullioned window was open against the warm summer sun. She leaned forward slightly to catch a whiff of fresh air. As she did so, one of the soldiers below grinned up at her suggestively. She stepped back quickly, grabbed the window, and slammed it shut. She turned away angrily. "The English pigs!" Bronwyn cursed under her breath. Her voice was soft, full of the heather and mist of the Highlands. Heavy footsteps sounded outside her door, and she caught her breath, then released it when they went past. She was a prisoner, held captive on England's northernmost border by men she'd always hated, men who now smiled and winked at her as if they were intimate with her most private thoughts. She walked to a small table in the center of the oak-paneled room. She clutched the edge of it, letting the wood cut into her palms. She'd do anything to keep those men from seeing how she felt inside. The English were her enemies. She'd seen them kill her father, his three chieftains. She'd seen her brother driven nearly insane with his futile attempts to repay the English in their own kind. And all her life she'd helped feed and clothe the members of her clan after the English had destroyed their crops and burned their houses. A month ago the English had taken her prisoner. Bronwyn smiled in memory of the wounds she and her men had inflicted upon the English soldiers. Later four of them had died. But in the end she was taken, by the order of the English Henry VII. The man said he wanted peace and therefore would name an Englishman as chief of Clan MacArran. He thought he could do this by marrying one of his knights to Bronwyn. She smiled at the ignorance of the English king. She was chief of Clan MacArran, and no man would take her power away. The stupid king thought her men would follow a foreigner, an Englishman, rather than their own chief because she was a woman. How little Henry knew of the Scots! She turned suddenly as Rab growled. He was an Irish wolfhound, the largest dog in the world, rangy, strong, hair like soft steel. Her father had given her the dog four years ago when Jamie'd returned from a trip to Ireland. Jamie had meant to have the dog trained as his daughter's guardian, but there was no need. Rab and Bronwyn took to each other immediately, and Rab had often shown that he'd give his life for his beloved mistress. Bronwyn's muscles relaxed when Rab's growl stopped -- only a friend produced such a reaction. She looked up expectantly. It was Morag who entered. Morag was a short, gnarled old woman, looking more like a dark burl of wood than a human being. Her eyes were like black glass, sparkling, penetrating, seeing more of a person than what was on the surface. She used her lithe little body to advantage, often slipping unnoticed amid people, her eyes and ears open. Morag moved silently across the room and opened the window. "Well?" Bronwyn demanded impatiently. "I saw ye slam the window. They laughed and said they'd take over the weddin' night ye'd be missin'." Bronwyn turned away from the old woman. "Ye give them too much to speak of. Ye should hold yer head high and ignore them. They're only Englishmen, while ye're a MacArran." Bronwyn whirled. "I don't need anyone to tell me how to act," she snapped. Rab, aware of his mistress's distress, came to stand beside her. She buried her fingers in his fur. Morag smiled at her, then watched as the girt moved toward the window seat. She had been placed in Morag's arms when Bronwyn was still wet from her birth. Morag had held the tiny bairn as she watched the mother die. It'd been Morag who'd found a wet nurse for the girl, who'd given her the name of her Welsh grandmother, and who'd cared for her until she was six and her father'd taken over. It was with pride that Morag looked at her charge now nearly twenty years old. Bronwyn was tall, taller than most men and as straight and supple as a reed. She didn't cover her hair like the Englishwoman, but let it flow down her back in a rich cascade. It was raven-black and so thick and heavy it was a wonder her slender neck could support the weight. She wore a satin dress in the English style. It was the color of the cream from the Highland cattle. The square neck was low and tight, showing Bronwyn's firm young breasts to advantage. It fit like skin to her small waist, then belled out in rich folds. Embroidery entwined with thin gold strands edged both the neck and the waist and fell in an intricate waterfall down the skirt. "Do I meet your approval?" Bronwyn asked sharply, still irritated over their quarrel about the English attire. She bad preferred Highland clothes, but Morag persuaded her to wear English garb, telling her to give the enemy no reason to laugh at her in what they referred to as "barbaric dress." Morag chuckled dryly. "I was thinkin' it was a shame no man would be takin' that gown from ye tonight." "An Englishman!" Bronwyn hissed. "Do you forget that so soon? Has the red of my father's blood faded before your eyes?" "Ye know it hasn't," Morag said quietly. Bronwyn sat down heavily on the window seat, the satin of the dress flowing about her. She ran her finger along the heavy embroidery. The dress had cost her a great deal, money that could have been spent on her clan. But she knew they would not have wanted to be shamed before the Englishmen, so she bought dresses that would have been the pride of any queen. Only this gown was to have been her wedding dress. She plucked violently at a piece of gold thread. "Here!" Morag commanded. "Don't destroy the dress because ye're mad at one Englishman. Perhaps the man had a reason to be late and miss his own weddin'." Bronwyn stood up quickly, causing Rab to move protectively to her side. "What do I care if the man never appears? I hope he had his throat cut and lies rotting in some ditch." Morag shrugged. "They'll only find ye a new husband, so what does it matter if this one dies or not? The sooner ye have yer English husband, the sooner we can go back to the Highlands." "It's easy for you to say!" Bronwyn snapped. "It's not you who must wed him and...and..." Morag's little black eyes danced. "And bed him? Is that what's worryin' ye? I'd gladly trade with ye if I could. Think this Stephen Montgomery would notice 'twere I to slip into his bed?" "What do I know of Stephen Montgomery except that he has no more respect for me than to leave me waiting in my wedding dress? You say the men laugh at me. The man who is to be my husband holds me up for their ridicule." She squinted at the door. "Were he to come through there now, I'd gladly take a knife to him." Morag smiled. Jamie MacArran would have been proud of his daughter. Even when she was still held prisoner she kept her pride and her spirit. Now she held her chin high, her eyes flashing with daggers of crystal-blue ice. Bronwyn was startlingly beautiful. Her hair was as black as a moonless midnight in the Scots mountains, her eyes as deep blue as the water of a sunlit loch. The contrast was arresting. It wasn't unusual for people, especially men, to be struck speechless the first time they saw her. Her lashes were thick and dark, her skin fine and creamy. Her lips of dark red were set above her father's chin, strong, square on the tip, and slightly cleft. "They'll think ye're a coward if ye hide in this room. What Scot is afraid of the smirks of an Englishman?" Bronwyn stiffened her back and looked down at the cream-colored gown. When she'd dressed that morning, she thought to be wed in the dress. Now it was hours past time for the marriage ceremony, and her bridegroom had not shown himself, nor had he sent any message of excuse or apology. "Help me unfasten this thing," Bronwyn said. The gown would have to be kept fresh until she did marry. If not today, then at another time. And perhaps to another man. The thought made her smile. "What are ye plannin'?" Morag asked, her hands at the back of Bronwyn's dress. "Ye've a look of the cat that got the cream." "You ask too many questions. Fetch me that green brocade gown. The Englishmen may think I'm a bride in tears at being snubbed, but they'll soon find the Scots are made of sterner stuff." Even though she was a prisoner and had been for over a month, Bronwyn was allowed the freedom of Sir Thomas Crichton's manor. She could walk about the house and, with an escort, on the grounds. The estate was heavily guarded, watched constantly. King Henry had told Bronwyn's clan that if a rescue attempt were made, she would be executed. No harm would come to her, but he meant to put an Englishman in the chiefship. The clan had recently seen the death of Jamie MacArran as well as of his three chieftains. The Scots retreated to watch their new laird held captive and planned what they'd do when the king's men dared to try to command them. Bronwyn slowly descended the stairs to the hall below. She knew her clansmen waited patiently just outside the grounds, hiding in the forest on the constantly turbulent border between England and Scotland. For herself she did not care if she died rather than accept the English dog she was to marry, but her death would cause strife within the clan. Jamie MacArran had designated his daughter as his successor, and she was to have married one of the chieftains who had died with her father. If Bronwyn were to die without issue, there would no doubt be a bloody battle over who would be the next laird. "I always knew the Montgomerys were smart men," laughed a man standing a few feet from Bronwyn. A thick tapestry hid her from his view. "Look at the way the eldest married that Revedoune heiress. He'd hardly got out of his marriage bed when her father was killed and he inherited the earldom." "And now Stephen is following in his brother's footsteps. Not only is this Bronwyn beautiful, but she owns hundreds of acres of land." "You can say what you like," said a third man. His sleeve was empty, his left arm missing. "But I don't envy Stephen. The woman is magnificent, but how long will he be able to enjoy her? I lost this fighting those devils in Scotland. They're only half human, I tell you. They grow up learning nothing but plunder and robbery. And they fight more like animals than men. They're a crude, savage lot." "And I heard their women stink to high heaven," the first man said. "For that black-haired Bronwyn I'd learn to hold my nose." Bronwyn took a step forward, a feral snarl on her lips. When a hand caught her arm, she looked up into a young man's face. He was handsome, with dark eyes, a firm mouth. Her eyes were on a level with his. "Allow me, my lady," he said quietly. He stepped forward to the group of men. His strong legs were encased in tight hose, his velvet jacket emphasizing the width of his shoulders. "Have you nothing better to do than gossip like old women? You talk of things you know nothing about." His voice was commanding. The three men looked startled. "Why, Roger, what's wrong with you?" one asked, then stared over Roger's shoulder and saw Bronwyn, her eyes glittering in stormy anger. "I think Stephen had better come soon and guard his property," one of the other men laughed. "Get out of here!" Roger ordered. "Or shall I draw my sword to get your attention?" "Deliver me from the hot blood of youth," one man said wearily. "Go to her. Come, the outside is cooler. The passions have more room to expand in the out-of-doors." When the men were gone, Roger turned back to Bronwyn. "May I apologize for my countrymen? Their rudeness is based on ignorance. They meant no harm." Bronwyn glared at him. "I fear it is you who are ignorant. They meant great harm, or do you consider murdering Scots no sin?" "I protest! You're unfair to me. I have killed few men in my life and no Scots." He paused. "May I introduce myself? I am Roger Chatworth." He swept his velvet cap from his head and bowed low before her. "And I, sir, am Bronwyn MacArran, prisoner to the English and, of late, discarded bride." "Lady Bronwyn, will you walk with me in the garden? Perhaps the sunshine will take away some of the misery Stephen has foisted upon you." She turned and walked beside him. At least he might keep the guards from tossing rude jests at her. Once they were outside, she spoke again. "You speak Montgomery's name as if you know him." "Have you not met him yourself?" Bronwyn whirled on him. "Since when have I been afforded any courtesy by your English king? My father thought enough of me to name me laird of Clan MacArran, but your king thinks I have too little sense to even choose my own husband. No, I have not seen this Stephen Montgomery, nor do I know anything about him. I was told one morning I was to marry him. Since then he has not so much as acknowledged my presence. " Roger lifted a handsome eyebrow at her. Her hostility made her eyes sp, Pocket Books, 1991, -: HarperCollins, -. Paperback. good. -. Synopsis:-Arley Mowbray is a drop-dead gorgeous 14-year-old, who, with her long, muscular frame and mature, collected manner could easily pass for 18. And pass she does. On a dare from her outspoken best friend, Elena Gutierrez, Arley writes to convict Dillon LeGrande in prison and convinces him she`s a college student (though she hasn`t made it out of junior high). Therein begins an ill-fated love story that myths are made of and men die for--except that`s not what Dillon has in mind. Living in south Texas in a poor Tex-Mex community, Arley dreams of a less provincial life and secretly begins a love affair with Dillon via correspondence, which produces a flurry of poetry and achy-breaky love songs. Against the wishes of family and friends, Arley weds her amour, who promptly fathers her child, breaks out of prison, and mysteriously disappears. Fortunately for Arley, she has found a guardian angel in the form of Annie Singer, a straight-talking public defender from New York. Annie becomes the mother Arley never had, protecting her from Dillon and a love-starved home. Despite the strength of their bond, both underestimate Dillon`s determination to get his child, no matter the cost. Jacquelyn Mitchard`s first novel, The Deep End of the Ocean, was the first to receive Oprah`s benediction, instantly making it a bestseller and thrusting Mitchard into the halls of literary stardom. Oprah`s picks tend to stay within the thematic boundaries of overcoming dysfunction, harping on the nitty-gritty details of abuse. However, The Most Wanted boldly strides away from this and examines the many dimensions of motherhood, realistically depicting the ties that bind women, while supporting beyond debate that, yes, good girls do fall for bad boys. --Rebekah Warren-> this Paperbackbook the publishing house is HarperCollins in 1999 it has 407 pages we have grade it as good and Has A Few Scuffs Marks Etc Reasonable used book it will be shipped from our UK warehouse shipping is Free for UK buyers and at a reasonable charge for buyer outside the UK, HarperCollins, New York U. S. A.: Harper Trophy. Very Good 1991. Softcover. Marfree, superclean, typical age; sm name inside, not marked-in, underscored, clearance or discard. Mails from NYC usually within 12 hours.; 0.7 x 7.4 x 4.9 Inches; 254 pages; Wonderful Read, Feb 6, 2002By Omni (New York, NY) -This book, published in the early sixties centers around a slave woman who during the Salem Witch Trials is tried as a witch. While the book itself is written in a fashion that made me wonder if I were reading something intended for young adults, it does hold water. The story is reasonably compelling and has enough intricacies of characters and betrayals to engage the reader. It telegraphs itself from a mile away, yes, that simplicity of form making it a story that doesn’t demand nor deceive.Tituba comes across as not so much foolish but as trapped by her circumstances. She is the property of a family, lead by a reverend of stern character in charge of white children who know that they have power over their adult caretaker. The mistress of the house spends all of her time sick and therefore powerless so the role of caretaker without authority falls to Tituba. For a book set during slavery, the subject of personal freedom isn’t addressed here because that’s not what this book is about. It’s about a further removal of rights and personal power through the witch-hunts. Tituba, through a series of first seemingly innocent events and then gradually darker, is trapped to becoming a witch on trial. Only when she is accused of being a witch does it really grind home the trap that slavery has her in. She cannot flee, she barely has rights to speak up for herself and because of race, is already half-condemned. It becomes literally her slave workman skills that bring her “friends” who will testify on her behalf, give her value over the other women on trial who are merely seen as witches.This book is an easy read, less than a couple of hours, closer to being like a short story in it’s simplistic form and intent. The adventure of the read is the twist ending. Being a slave saves Tituba so that she can return to slavery. A dark irony that strikes home when one begins comparing what was the greater evil and how one evil can save a person from another by enshrouding them. Here, slavery is a helper, unfortunately. Luckily, it is made clear by the force of witch-hunt story that this is not a book about slavery, pro or con. It is about a woman, a Black woman, who is a slave in a culture that persecutes all of its inhabitants in any way possible for being different or having new ideas. In the end, this book is about the cruelty of humans, in so many forms---bigotry, misogyny, racism, etc.. ., Harper Trophy, 1991

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Tituba of Salem Village - Petry, Ann
(*)
Petry, Ann:
Tituba of Salem Village - Taschenbuch

2002, ISBN: 9780064404037

ID: 271129879

New York U. S. A.: Harper Trophy. Very Good 1991. Softcover. Marfree, superclean, typical age; sm name inside, not marked-in, underscored, clearance or discard. Mails from NYC usually within 12 hours.; 0.7 x 7.4 x 4.9 Inches; 254 pages; Wonderful Read, Feb 6, 2002By Omni (New York, NY) -This book, published in the early sixties centers around a slave woman who during the Salem Witch Trials is tried as a witch. While the book itself is written in a fashion that made me wonder if I were reading something intended for young adults, it does hold water. The story is reasonably compelling and has enough intricacies of characters and betrayals to engage the reader. It telegraphs itself from a mile away, yes, that simplicity of form making it a story that doesn’t demand nor deceive.Tituba comes across as not so much foolish but as trapped by her circumstances. She is the property of a family, lead by a reverend of stern character in charge of white children who know that they have power over their adult caretaker. The mistress of the house spends all of her time sick and therefore powerless so the role of caretaker without authority falls to Tituba. For a book set during slavery, the subject of personal freedom isn’t addressed here because that’s not what this book is about. It’s about a further removal of rights and personal power through the witch-hunts. Tituba, through a series of first seemingly innocent events and then gradually darker, is trapped to becoming a witch on trial. Only when she is accused of being a witch does it really grind home the trap that slavery has her in. She cannot flee, she barely has rights to speak up for herself and because of race, is already half-condemned. It becomes literally her slave workman skills that bring her “friends” who will testify on her behalf, give her value over the other women on trial who are merely seen as witches.This book is an easy read, less than a couple of hours, closer to being like a short story in it’s simplistic form and intent. The adventure of the read is the twist ending. Being a slave saves Tituba so that she can return to slavery. A dark irony that strikes home when one begins comparing what was the greater evil and how one evil can save a person from another by enshrouding them. Here, slavery is a helper, unfortunately. Luckily, it is made clear by the force of witch-hunt story that this is not a book about slavery, pro or con. It is about a woman, a Black woman, who is a slave in a culture that persecutes all of its inhabitants in any way possible for being different or having new ideas. In the end, this book is about the cruelty of humans, in so many forms---bigotry, misogyny, racism, etc.. ., Harper Trophy, 1991

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BobPrudhomme, Relentless Bookfinder
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Tituba of Salem Village - Ann Petry
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Ann Petry:
Tituba of Salem Village - Taschenbuch

ISBN: 006440403X

[SR: 1175092], Paperback, [EAN: 9780064404037], HarperCollins, HarperCollins, Book, [PU: HarperCollins], 1991-10-20, HarperCollins, Tituba, the minister's slave, gazed into the stone watering trough. She did not see her own reflection. Instead, she saw a vision of herself, surrounded by angry people. The people were staring at her. Their faces showed fear. That was several years ago. It is now 1692, and there is strange talk in Salem Village. Talk of witches. Several girls have been taken with fits, and there is only one explanation: Someone in the village has been doing the devil's work. All eyes are on Tituba, the one person who can tell fortunes with cards, and who can spin a thread so fine it must be magic. Did Tituba see the future that day at the watering trough? If so, Could she actually be hanged for practicing witchcraft?, 3135, Prejudice & Racism, 7009086011, Difficult Discussions, 1084192, Growing Up & Facts of Life, 4, Children's Books, 1000, Subjects, 283155, Books, 3142, Violence, 7009086011, Difficult Discussions, 1084192, Growing Up & Facts of Life, 4, Children's Books, 1000, Subjects, 283155, Books, 2959, Colonial, 2956, United States, 2926, Historical Fiction, 2966, Literature & Fiction, 4, Children's Books, 1000, Subjects, 283155, Books, 3023, Explore the World, 3024, Africa, 3025, Asia, 3178, Atlases, 3026, Australia & Oceania, 3027, Canada, 3028, Central & South America, 3029, Europe, 3040, Mexico, 3041, Middle East, 3043, Polar Regions, 3044, United States, 3344091011, Geography & Cultures, 4, Children's Books, 1000, Subjects, 283155, Books

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Tituba of Salem Village - Ann Petry
(*)
Ann Petry:
Tituba of Salem Village - Taschenbuch

ISBN: 9780064404037

ID: 1075525507

St. Anthony Messenger Press. Paperback. GOOD. Spine creases, wear to binding and pages from reading. May contain limited notes, underlining or highlighting that does affect the text. Possible ex library copy, that’ll have the markings and stickers associated from the library. Accessories such as CD, codes, toys, may not be included., St. Anthony Messenger Press, Childrens Pr. Library Binding. GOOD. Spine creases, wear to binding and pages from reading. May contain limited notes, underlining or highlighting that does affect the text. Possible ex library copy, that’ll have the markings and stickers associated from the library. Accessories such as CD, codes, toys, may not be included., Childrens Pr, HarperCollins. Paperback. POOR. Noticeably used book. Heavy wear to cover. Pages contain marginal notes, underlining, and or highlighting. Possible ex library copy, with all the markings/stickers of that library. Accessories such as CD, codes, toys, and dust jackets may not be included., HarperCollins

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Tituba of Salem Village - Petry, Ann
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Petry, Ann:
Tituba of Salem Village - gebrauchtes Buch

ISBN: 9780064404037

ID: 1080180195

HarperCollins. Used - Very Good., HarperCollins

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Details zum Buch
Tituba of Salem Village

In the Salem Village of 1692, superstition and hysteria peaked with the Salem witch trials. One of the first three "witches" condemned is Tituba, a slave from Barbados. "This restrained but dramatic narrative . . . brings to life not only Tituba but also those around her, and shows how suspicion against her culminated in her arrest and trial".--Booklist.

Detailangaben zum Buch - Tituba of Salem Village


EAN (ISBN-13): 9780064404037
ISBN (ISBN-10): 006440403X
Taschenbuch
Erscheinungsjahr: 1991
Herausgeber: Harper Trophy

Buch in der Datenbank seit 2007-10-11T17:55:53+02:00 (Berlin)
Detailseite zuletzt geändert am 2019-03-09T10:13:47+01:00 (Berlin)
ISBN/EAN: 006440403X

ISBN - alternative Schreibweisen:
0-06-440403-X, 978-0-06-440403-7


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