. .
Deutsch
Deutschland
Ähnliche Bücher
Weitere, andere Bücher, die diesem Buch sehr ähnlich sein könnten:
Suchtools
Anmelden

Anmelden mit Facebook:

Registrieren
Passwort vergessen?


Such-Historie
Merkliste
Links zu eurobuch.com

Dieses Buch teilen auf…
..?
Buchtipps
Aktuelles
Tipp von eurobuch.com
FILTER
- 0 Ergebnisse
Kleinster Preis: 20.99 EUR, größter Preis: 29.95 EUR, Mittelwert: 25.03 EUR
Stained Glass in France - Sherrill, Charles Hitchcock
Vergriffenes Buch, derzeit bei uns nicht verfügbar.
(*)
Sherrill, Charles Hitchcock:

Stained Glass in France - Taschenbuch

2007, ISBN: 1406771309, Lieferbar binnen 4-6 Wochen Versandkosten:Versandkostenfrei innerhalb der BRD

ID: 9781406771305

Internationaler Buchtitel. In englischer Sprache. Verlag: DODO PR, 328 Seiten, L=216mm, B=140mm, H=19mm, Gew.=417gr, [GR: 25810 - TB/Kunst/Antiquitäten], [SW: - Antiques / Collectibles], Kartoniert/Broschiert, Klappentext: TO THAT REMORSELESS CRITIC MY WIFE THIS BOOK IS GRATEFULLY DEDICATED CONTENTS INTRODUCTION . ... 18 THIRTEENTH CENTURY AND EARLIER . . 26 THIRTEENTH CENTURY TOURS . . 87 FOURTEENTH AND FIFTEENTH CENTURIES .... 117 FOURTEENTH AND FIFTEENTH CENTURY TOURS., 184-SIXTEENTH CENTURY . . 197 SIXTEENTH CENTURY TOURS 212 ITINERARIES 395 INDEX 297 FOKEWOED THE purpose of this book is a very simple one. It is to provide an answer to the question, Where does one find good stained glass in France, and how can it most conveniently be seen All the books upon this subject are more or less technical and are in tended rather for the student than the sightseer. Dur ing the six years that the writer has been studying glass, he has so often been asked the above question, as to finally conclude that an answer in the form of a simple touring handbook might be of service. To that end he has put together notes taken on simdiy vacation trips. The reader should be indulgent, for the writer is not an authority on glass just a lawyer on a holiday. In addition to the purpose al ready described, it is hoped that this little book may also serve to lure forth into the charming French country some who have hitherto neither heard nor cared much about glass, so that they may see the wonderful beauty that the stained-glass window can alone reveal, CHARLES HITCHCOCK SHERRILL. 20, East 65th Street, New York Christmas, 1907. 11 INTRODUCTION THE reason for the existence of a window is obvi ous. When the dwelling ceased to be a cave and be came a house, the need for a light aperture at once arose. Neither the house nor the window concern us until long after the house had been made thorough ly habitable, and its windows aftermuch evolution are finally filled with a sheet of translucent substance, which, while excluding the weather, would admit the light. Our interest does not begin until the wish to decorate the house naturally brought about a de sire to decorate the window. We will pass over the story of the discovery of glass and its gradual im provement nor will wo pause to consider the very earliest examples now extant, nor examine the steps through which it must have passed to reach so ad vanced a stage as we find in the twelfth century. This is a book to tell where to see windows, and therefore it imist not take up stained glass until a period is reached when examples are sufficiently numerous and beautiful to repay a visit to them. At what date then, shall we make our beginning There is prac-13 INTRODUCTION tically nothing until we come to the charming re mains of the twelfth century but because these lat ter are very few and those few in churches which also contain glass of the next century, we shall com mence with the heading of Thirteenth Century and Earlier. That explains why we have selected this particular epoch as the starting point of our investi gations. Our windows will themselves disclose to us that the Golden Age of French stained glass falls of itself into three subdivisions the first com prising the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, the sec ond the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, and the third the sixteenth century. Of the second subdivision we shall find but few examples, of the first more, and of the third most. No matter how far back we push our researches, s we are sure to be siirprised at the advanced state of the art represented by any window which attempts a picture. In fact, we shall happen upon no satis factory traces of the evolution which must have led up to even the crudest and oldest story-window. We are forced, therefore, to conclude that this evolution must have occurred in another art, and the renult there evolved transferred into this one. This conclusion is much strengthened when we read that St. Sophia, built by Justinian during the sixth century in Con stantinople, contained not only glass mosaics on the walls, but also in its windows. Here we have the key to the puzzle. The many artists who were then TO THAT REMORSELESS CRITIC MY WIFE THIS BOOK IS GRATEFULLY DEDICATED CONTENTS INTRODUCTION . ... 18 THIRTEENTH CENTURY AND EARLIER . . 26 THIRTEENTH CENTURY TOURS . . 87 FOURTEENTH AND FIFTEENTH CENTURIES .... 117 FOURTEENTH AND FIFTEENTH CENTURY TOURS., 184-SIXTEENTH CENTURY . . 197 SIXTEENTH CENTURY TOURS 212 ITINERARIES 395 INDEX 297 FOKEWOED THE purpose of this book is a very simple one. It is to provide an answer to the question, Where does one find good stained glass in France, and how can it most conveniently be seen All the books upon this subject are more or less technical and are in tended rather for the student than the sightseer. Dur ing the six years that the writer has been studying glass, he has so often been asked the above question, as to finally conclude that an answer in the form of a simple touring handbook might be of service. To that end he has put together notes taken on simdiy vacation trips. The reader should be indulgent, for the writer is not an authority on glass just a lawyer on a holiday. In addition to the purpose al ready described, it is hoped that this little book may also serve to lure forth into the charming French country some who have hitherto neither heard nor cared much about glass, so that they may see the wonderful beauty that the stained-glass window can alone reveal, CHARLES HITCHCOCK SHERRILL. 20, East 65th Street, New York Christmas, 1907. 11 INTRODUCTION THE reason for the existence of a window is obvi ous. When the dwelling ceased to be a cave and be came a house, the need for a light aperture at once arose. Neither the house nor the window concern us until long after the house had been made thorough ly habitable, and its windows aftermuch evolution are finally filled with a sheet of translucent substance, which, while excluding the weather, would admit the light. Our interest does not begin until the wish to decorate the house naturally brought about a de sire to decorate the window. We will pass over the story of the discovery of glass and its gradual im provement nor will wo pause to consider the very earliest examples now extant, nor examine the steps through which it must have passed to reach so ad vanced a stage as we find in the twelfth century. This is a book to tell where to see windows, and therefore it imist not take up stained glass until a period is reached when examples are sufficiently numerous and beautiful to repay a visit to them. At what date then, shall we make our beginning There is prac-13 INTRODUCTION tically nothing until we come to the charming re mains of the twelfth century but because these lat ter are very few and those few in churches which also contain glass of the next century, we shall com mence with the heading of Thirteenth Century and Earlier. That explains why we have selected this particular epoch as the starting point of our investi gations. Our windows will themselves disclose to us that the Golden Age of French stained glass falls of itself into three subdivisions the first com prising the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, the sec ond the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, and the third the sixteenth century. Of the second subdivision we shall find but few examples, of the first more, and of the third most. No matter how far back we push our researches, s we are sure to be siirprised at the advanced state of the art represented by any window which attempts a picture. In fact, we shall happen upon no satis factory traces of the evolution which must have led up to even the crudest and oldest story-window. We are forced, therefore, to conclude that this evolution must have occurred in another art, and the renult there evolved transferred into this one. This conclusion is much strengthened when we read that St. Sophia, built by Justinian during the sixth century in Con stantinople, contained not only glass mosaics on the walls, but also in its windows. Here we have the key to the puzzle. The many artists who were then

Neues Buch DEU
Buchgeier.com
Lieferbar binnen 4-6 Wochen (Besorgungstitel) Versandkosten:Versandkostenfrei innerhalb der BRD
Details...
(*) Derzeit vergriffen bedeutet, dass dieser Titel momentan auf keiner der angeschlossenen Plattform verfügbar ist.
Stained Glass in France - Sherrill, Charles Hitchcock
Vergriffenes Buch, derzeit bei uns nicht verfügbar.
(*)

Sherrill, Charles Hitchcock:

Stained Glass in France - Taschenbuch

2007, ISBN: 1406771309, Lieferbar binnen 4-6 Wochen

ID: 9781406771305

Internationaler Buchtitel. In englischer Sprache. Verlag: DODO PR, 328 Seiten, L=216mm, B=140mm, H=19mm, Gew.=417gr, [GR: 25810 - TB/Kunst/Antiquitäten], [SW: - Antiques / Collectibles], Kartoniert/Broschiert, Klappentext: TO THAT REMORSELESS CRITIC MY WIFE THIS BOOK IS GRATEFULLY DEDICATED CONTENTS INTRODUCTION . ... 18 THIRTEENTH CENTURY AND EARLIER . . 26 THIRTEENTH CENTURY TOURS . . 87 FOURTEENTH AND FIFTEENTH CENTURIES .... 117 FOURTEENTH AND FIFTEENTH CENTURY TOURS., 184-SIXTEENTH CENTURY . . 197 SIXTEENTH CENTURY TOURS 212 ITINERARIES 395 INDEX 297 FOKEWOED THE purpose of this book is a very simple one. It is to provide an answer to the question, Where does one find good stained glass in France, and how can it most conveniently be seen All the books upon this subject are more or less technical and are in tended rather for the student than the sightseer. Dur ing the six years that the writer has been studying glass, he has so often been asked the above question, as to finally conclude that an answer in the form of a simple touring handbook might be of service. To that end he has put together notes taken on simdiy vacation trips. The reader should be indulgent, for the writer is not an authority on glass just a lawyer on a holiday. In addition to the purpose al ready described, it is hoped that this little book may also serve to lure forth into the charming French country some who have hitherto neither heard nor cared much about glass, so that they may see the wonderful beauty that the stained-glass window can alone reveal, CHARLES HITCHCOCK SHERRILL. 20, East 65th Street, New York Christmas, 1907. 11 INTRODUCTION THE reason for the existence of a window is obvi ous. When the dwelling ceased to be a cave and be came a house, the need for a light aperture at once arose. Neither the house nor the window concern us until long after the house had been made thorough ly habitable, and its windows aftermuch evolution are finally filled with a sheet of translucent substance, which, while excluding the weather, would admit the light. Our interest does not begin until the wish to decorate the house naturally brought about a de sire to decorate the window. We will pass over the story of the discovery of glass and its gradual im provement nor will wo pause to consider the very earliest examples now extant, nor examine the steps through which it must have passed to reach so ad vanced a stage as we find in the twelfth century. This is a book to tell where to see windows, and therefore it imist not take up stained glass until a period is reached when examples are sufficiently numerous and beautiful to repay a visit to them. At what date then, shall we make our beginning There is prac-13 INTRODUCTION tically nothing until we come to the charming re mains of the twelfth century but because these lat ter are very few and those few in churches which also contain glass of the next century, we shall com mence with the heading of Thirteenth Century and Earlier. That explains why we have selected this particular epoch as the starting point of our investi gations. Our windows will themselves disclose to us that the Golden Age of French stained glass falls of itself into three subdivisions the first com prising the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, the sec ond the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, and the third the sixteenth century. Of the second subdivision we shall find but few examples, of the first more, and of the third most. No matter how far back we push our researches, s we are sure to be siirprised at the advanced state of the art represented by any window which attempts a picture. In fact, we shall happen upon no satis factory traces of the evolution which must have led up to even the crudest and oldest story-window. We are forced, therefore, to conclude that this evolution must have occurred in another art, and the renult there evolved transferred into this one. This conclusion is much strengthened when we read that St. Sophia, built by Justinian during the sixth century in Con stantinople, contained not only glass mosaics on the walls, but also in its windows. Here we have the key to the puzzle. The many artists who were then

Neues Buch eurobuch.neubuch
Buchgeier.com
Lieferbar binnen 4-6 Wochen (Besorgungstitel)
Details...
(*) Derzeit vergriffen bedeutet, dass dieser Titel momentan auf keiner der angeschlossenen Plattform verfügbar ist.
Stained Glass in France - Sherrill, Charles Hitchcock
Vergriffenes Buch, derzeit bei uns nicht verfügbar.
(*)
Sherrill, Charles Hitchcock:
Stained Glass in France - Taschenbuch

1907

ISBN: 9781406771305

[ED: Taschenbuch], [PU: DODO PR], TO THAT REMORSELESS CRITIC MY WIFE THIS BOOK IS GRATEFULLY DEDICATED CONTENTS INTRODUCTION . ... 18 THIRTEENTH CENTURY AND EARLIER . . 26 THIRTEENTH CENTURY TOURS . . 87 FOURTEENTH AND FIFTEENTH CENTURIES .... 117 FOURTEENTH AND FIFTEENTH CENTURY TOURS., 184-SIXTEENTH CENTURY . . 197 SIXTEENTH CENTURY TOURS 212 ITINERARIES 395 INDEX 297 FOKEWOED THE purpose of this book is a very simple one. It is to provide an answer to the question, Where does one find good stained glass in France, and how can it most conveniently be seen All the books upon this subject are more or less technical and are in tended rather for the student than the sightseer. Dur ing the six years that the writer has been studying glass, he has so often been asked the above question, as to finally conclude that an answer in the form of a simple touring handbook might be of service. To that end he has put together notes taken on simdiy vacation trips. The reader should be indulgent, for the writer is not an authority on glass just a lawyer on a holiday. In addition to the purpose al ready described, it is hoped that this little book may also serve to lure forth into the charming French country some who have hitherto neither heard nor cared much about glass, so that they may see the wonderful beauty that the stained-glass window can alone reveal, CHARLES HITCHCOCK SHERRILL. 20, East 65th Street, New York Christmas, 1907. 11 INTRODUCTION THE reason for the existence of a window is obvi ous. When the dwelling ceased to be a cave and be came a house, the need for a light aperture at once arose. Neither the house nor the window concern us until long after the house had been made thorough ly habitable, and its windows aftermuch evolution are finally filled with a sheet of translucent substance, which, while excluding the weather, would admit the light. Our interest does not begin until the wish to decorate the house naturally brought about a de sire to decorate the window. We will pass over the story of the discovery of glass and its gradual im provement nor will wo pause to consider the very earliest examples now extant, nor examine the steps through which it must have passed to reach so ad vanced a stage as we find in the twelfth century. This is a book to tell where to see windows, and therefore it imist not take up stained glass until a period is reached when examples are sufficiently numerous and beautiful to repay a visit to them. At what date then, shall we make our beginning There is prac-13 INTRODUCTION tically nothing until we come to the charming re mains of the twelfth century but because these lat ter are very few and those few in churches which also contain glass of the next century, we shall com mence with the heading of Thirteenth Century and Earlier. That explains why we have selected this particular epoch as the starting point of our investi gations. Our windows will themselves disclose to us that the Golden Age of French stained glass falls of itself into three subdivisions the first com prising the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, the sec ond the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, and the third the sixteenth century. Of the second subdivision we shall find but few examples, of the first more, and of the third most. No matter how far back we push our researches, s we are sure to be siirprised at the advanced state of the art represented by any window which attempts a picture. In fact, we shall happen upon no satis factory traces of the evolution which must have led up to even the crudest and oldest story-window. We are forced, therefore, to conclude that this evolution must have occurred in another art, and the renult there evolved transferred into this one. This conclusion is much strengthened when we read that St. Sophia, built by Justinian during the sixth century in Con stantinople, contained not only glass mosaics on the walls, but also in its windows. Here we have the key to the puzzle. The many artists who were then Versandfertig in 6-10 Tagen, [SC: 0.00]

Neues Buch Booklooker.de
buecher.de GmbH & Co. KG
Versandkosten:Versandkostenfrei, Versand in die EU (EUR 0.00)
Details...
(*) Derzeit vergriffen bedeutet, dass dieser Titel momentan auf keiner der angeschlossenen Plattform verfügbar ist.
Stained Glass In France - Charles Hitchcock Sherrill
Vergriffenes Buch, derzeit bei uns nicht verfügbar.
(*)
Charles Hitchcock Sherrill:
Stained Glass In France - Taschenbuch

ISBN: 9781406771305

Paperback, [PU: Read Books], Antiques & Collectables

Neues Buch Bookdepository.com
Versandkosten:Versandkostenfrei (EUR 0.00)
Details...
(*) Derzeit vergriffen bedeutet, dass dieser Titel momentan auf keiner der angeschlossenen Plattform verfügbar ist.

< zum Suchergebnis...
Details zum Buch
Stained Glass in France
Autor:

Sherrill, Charles Hitchcock

Titel:

Stained Glass in France

ISBN-Nummer:

9781406771305

TO THAT REMORSELESS CRITIC MY WIFE THIS BOOK IS GRATEFULLY DEDICATED CONTENTS INTRODUCTION . ... 18 THIRTEENTH CENTURY AND EARLIER . . 26 THIRTEENTH CENTURY TOURS . . 87 FOURTEENTH AND FIFTEENTH CENTURIES .... 117 FOURTEENTH AND FIFTEENTH CENTURY TOURS., 184-SIXTEENTH CENTURY . . 197 SIXTEENTH CENTURY TOURS 212 ITINERARIES 395 INDEX 297 FOKEWOED THE purpose of this book is a very simple one. It is to provide an answer to the question, Where does one find good stained glass in France, and how can it most conveniently be seen All the books upon this subject are more or less technical and are in tended rather for the student than the sightseer. Dur ing the six years that the writer has been studying glass, he has so often been asked the above question, as to finally conclude that an answer in the form of a simple touring handbook might be of service. To that end he has put together notes taken on simdiy vacation trips. The reader should be indulgent, for the writer is not an authority on glass just a lawyer on a holiday. In addition to the purpose al ready described, it is hoped that this little book may also serve to lure forth into the charming French country some who have hitherto neither heard nor cared much about glass, so that they may see the wonderful beauty that the stained-glass window can alone reveal, CHARLES HITCHCOCK SHERRILL. 20, East 65th Street, New York Christmas, 1907. 11 INTRODUCTION THE reason for the existence of a window is obvi ous. When the dwelling ceased to be a cave and be came a house, the need for a light aperture at once arose. Neither the house nor the window concern us until long after the house had been made thorough ly habitable, and its windows aftermuch evolution are finally filled with a sheet of translucent substance, which, while excluding the weather, would admit the light. Our interest does not begin until the wish to decorate the house naturally brought about a de sire to decorate the window. We will pass over the story of the discovery of glass and its gradual im provement nor will wo pause to consider the very earliest examples now extant, nor examine the steps through which it must have passed to reach so ad vanced a stage as we find in the twelfth century. This is a book to tell where to see windows, and therefore it imist not take up stained glass until a period is reached when examples are sufficiently numerous and beautiful to repay a visit to them. At what date then, shall we make our beginning There is prac-13 INTRODUCTION tically nothing until we come to the charming re mains of the twelfth century but because these lat ter are very few and those few in churches which also contain glass of the next century, we shall com mence with the heading of Thirteenth Century and Earlier. That explains why we have selected this particular epoch as the starting point of our investi gations. Our windows will themselves disclose to us that the Golden Age of French stained glass falls of itself into three subdivisions the first com prising the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, the sec ond the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, and the third the sixteenth century. Of the second subdivision we shall find but few examples, of the first more, and of the third most. No matter how far back we push our researches, s we are sure to be siirprised at the advanced state of the art represented by any window which attempts a picture. In fact, we shall happen upon no satis factory traces of the evolution which must have led up to even the crudest and oldest story-window. We are forced, therefore, to conclude that this evolution must have occurred in another art, and the renult there evolved transferred into this one. This conclusion is much strengthened when we read that St. Sophia, built by Justinian during the sixth century in Con stantinople, contained not only glass mosaics on the walls, but also in its windows. Here we have the key to the puzzle. The many artists who were then

Detailangaben zum Buch - Stained Glass in France


EAN (ISBN-13): 9781406771305
ISBN (ISBN-10): 1406771309
Taschenbuch
Erscheinungsjahr: 2007
Herausgeber: DODO PR
328 Seiten
Gewicht: 0,417 kg
Sprache: eng/Englisch

Buch in der Datenbank seit 22.11.2007 14:26:08
Buch zuletzt gefunden am 21.09.2012 17:00:37
ISBN/EAN: 9781406771305

ISBN - alternative Schreibweisen:
1-4067-7130-9, 978-1-4067-7130-5

< zum Suchergebnis...
< zum Archiv...
Benachbarte Bücher