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Portraits and Reflections - Hodgson, Stuart
Vergriffenes Buch, derzeit bei uns nicht verfügbar.
(*)
Hodgson, Stuart:

Portraits and Reflections - Taschenbuch

2007, ISBN: 1406745863, Lieferbar binnen 4-6 Wochen Versandkosten:Versandkostenfrei innerhalb der BRD

ID: 9781406745863

Internationaler Buchtitel. In englischer Sprache. Verlag: DODO PR, 192 Seiten, L=216mm, B=140mm, H=11mm, Gew.=249gr, [GR: 21600 - TB/Belletristik/Biographien, Erinnerungen], [SW: - Biography / Autobiography], Kartoniert/Broschiert, Klappentext: REFLECTIS STUART HODGSON NEW YORK E. P. BUTTON COMPANY 681 FIFTH AVENUE TO MY WIFE WHO SO NEARLY NEVER SAW THE LITTLE BOOK IN WHICH SHE TOOK SUCH INTEREST CONTENTS PAGE PREFACE . . . Ix KING GEORGE V 13 MR. LLOYD GEORGE ....... 26 MONSIEUR ARISTIDE BRIAND . . . . 32 MR. WINSTON CHURCHILL . . . . . 39 LORD BlRKENHEAD ....... 49 MR. HENRY FORD ....... 56 MR. ROBERT LYND ....... 65 SENOR CAPAELANCA . . . . . . 73 SIR AUSTEN CHAMBERLAIN . . . . . .80 MR. Low 85 MR. ALFRED EMMANUEL SMITH . . . 91 MR. GARVIN ........ 102 CANON STREETER . . . . . . .109 SIGNOR MUSSOLINI 114 MR. LEON M. LION 121 SIR WILLIAM JOYNSON HICKS 129 MR. J. H. THOMAS 134 LADY ASTOR . . . - 139 SIR JOHN SIMON ...... 146 vii viii CONTENTS PAGE MR. J. M. KEYNES 152 MR. ARTHUR HENDERSON . . . . .158 MR. A. G. GARDINER 163 LORD MELCHETT 170 DR. T. R. GLOVER 178 MR. H. M. TOMLINSON 185 PREFACE BORED with the tedious journey through the Lancashire fog and smoke, the young Frenchman who was with me turned himself about to the clouded window of the railway carriage, and with his long forefinger drew upon it the counterfeit presentment of the huge navvy sitting in front of him. I was leaning over to remonstrate, not so much on the impudence, as on the extreme imprudence of his conduct for the navvy was of somewhat truculent aspect when the little mill girl by my side saw the picture upon the window and burst into peal upon peal of shrill laughter. The astounded navvy gazed heavily, first at her, and then at the French man. Then his eye caught the window. Ere, he said fiercely, tapping Henri upon the knee, what you been drawin Little moment, said Henri, working away feverishly at the window. But regard then, my good monsieur witha successful showmans triumphant ges ture regard then And he displayed upon the window-pane a really very creditable portrait, considering his limited means, of the laughing ix PREFACE mill girl Eh cried the navvy, gazing with open mouth and eyes, Eh As to the mill girl, she gave one glance at it and fell back, wrapping herself in her shawl her body shaken with convulsive quiverings, a Lancashire Niobe for a stranger would have said that she was weeping bitterly. 1 have not Henris artistic finger, and I can not flatter myself that my pictures upon the window-pane either deserve or will receive the acclaim which greeted his. I recall the incident merely to protect my poor little sketches from the charge of humourless impertinence. They are not an attempt to do again, still less to do hotter, what others have, in the case of many of my victims, done before. They are merely rough drawings of fellow travellers who have happened for a longer or a shorter time to be in the same compartment with me with one or two figures seen out of the window as I passed, and for one reason or another catching rny interest and attention, It has amused me to draw them it may amuse others to glance at the results. The collection is quite arbitrary it is not in any sense representative For symmetrys sake, I could wish it were more so. I should like, for instance to have included more women, but there happened to be few in the compartment. I should like again to have put in more young PREFACE xi men. But here I was in a difficulty. The well-known figures of to-day have nearly all been well-known for a long time. The figures that will be well-known in the future are not known at all to-day. There is a gap betweenthe two, like the starless space in the skies which astrono mers call the Coal Sack. And this is true, I believe, of all walks of life alike. In one Oxford college I know, for instance, there is a gap of twenty-one years between the youngest of the old dons and the oldest of the young ones... REFLECTIS STUART HODGSON NEW YORK E. P. BUTTON COMPANY 681 FIFTH AVENUE TO MY WIFE WHO SO NEARLY NEVER SAW THE LITTLE BOOK IN WHICH SHE TOOK SUCH INTEREST CONTENTS PAGE PREFACE . . . Ix KING GEORGE V 13 MR. LLOYD GEORGE ....... 26 MONSIEUR ARISTIDE BRIAND . . . . 32 MR. WINSTON CHURCHILL . . . . . 39 LORD BlRKENHEAD ....... 49 MR. HENRY FORD ....... 56 MR. ROBERT LYND ....... 65 SENOR CAPAELANCA . . . . . . 73 SIR AUSTEN CHAMBERLAIN . . . . . .80 MR. Low 85 MR. ALFRED EMMANUEL SMITH . . . 91 MR. GARVIN ........ 102 CANON STREETER . . . . . . .109 SIGNOR MUSSOLINI 114 MR. LEON M. LION 121 SIR WILLIAM JOYNSON HICKS 129 MR. J. H. THOMAS 134 LADY ASTOR . . . - 139 SIR JOHN SIMON ...... 146 vii viii CONTENTS PAGE MR. J. M. KEYNES 152 MR. ARTHUR HENDERSON . . . . .158 MR. A. G. GARDINER 163 LORD MELCHETT 170 DR. T. R. GLOVER 178 MR. H. M. TOMLINSON 185 PREFACE BORED with the tedious journey through the Lancashire fog and smoke, the young Frenchman who was with me turned himself about to the clouded window of the railway carriage, and with his long forefinger drew upon it the counterfeit presentment of the huge navvy sitting in front of him. I was leaning over to remonstrate, not so much on the impudence, as on the extreme imprudence of his conduct for the navvy was of somewhat truculent aspect when the little mill girl by my side saw the picture upon the window and burst into peal upon peal of shrill laughter. The astounded navvy gazed heavily, first at her, and then at the French man. Then his eye caught the window. Ere, he said fiercely, tapping Henri upon the knee, what you been drawin Little moment, said Henri, working away feverishly at the window. But regard then, my good monsieur witha successful showmans triumphant ges ture regard then And he displayed upon the window-pane a really very creditable portrait, considering his limited means, of the laughing ix PREFACE mill girl Eh cried the navvy, gazing with open mouth and eyes, Eh As to the mill girl, she gave one glance at it and fell back, wrapping herself in her shawl her body shaken with convulsive quiverings, a Lancashire Niobe for a stranger would have said that she was weeping bitterly. 1 have not Henris artistic finger, and I can not flatter myself that my pictures upon the window-pane either deserve or will receive the acclaim which greeted his. I recall the incident merely to protect my poor little sketches from the charge of humourless impertinence. They are not an attempt to do again, still less to do hotter, what others have, in the case of many of my victims, done before. They are merely rough drawings of fellow travellers who have happened for a longer or a shorter time to be in the same compartment with me with one or two figures seen out of the window as I passed, and for one reason or another catching rny interest and attention, It has amused me to draw them it may amuse others to glance at the results. The collection is quite arbitrary it is not in any sense representative For symmetrys sake, I could wish it were more so. I should like, for instance to have included more women, but there happened to be few in the compartment. I should like again to have put in more young PREFACE xi men. But here I was in a difficulty. The well-known figures of to-day have nearly all been well-known for a long time. The figures that will be well-known in the future are not known at all to-day. There is a gap betweenthe two, like the starless space in the skies which astrono mers call the Coal Sack. And this is true, I believe, of all walks of life alike. In one Oxford college I know, for instance, there is a gap of twenty-one years between the youngest of the old dons and the oldest of the young ones...

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Stuart Hodgson:

Portraits and Reflections - Taschenbuch

ISBN: 1406745863

ID: 1170667968

[EAN: 9781406745863], Neubuch, [PU: Iyer Press], BRAND NEW PRINT ON DEMAND., Portraits and Reflections, Stuart Hodgson, REFLECTIS STUART HODGSON NEW YORK E. P. BUTTON COMPANY 681 FIFTH AVENUE TO MY WIFE WHO SO NEARLY NEVER SAW THE LITTLE BOOK IN WHICH SHE TOOK SUCH INTEREST CONTENTS PAGE PREFACE . . . Ix KING GEORGE V 13 MR. LLOYD GEORGE . 26 MONSIEUR ARISTIDE BRIAND . . . . 32 MR. WINSTON CHURCHILL . . . . . 39 LORD BlRKENHEAD . 49 MR. HENRY FORD . 56 MR. ROBERT LYND . 65 SENOR CAPAELANCA . . . . . . 73 SIR AUSTEN CHAMBERLAIN . . . . . .80 MR. Low 85 MR. ALFRED EMMANUEL SMITH . . . 91 MR. GARVIN . 102 CANON STREETER . . . . . . .109 SIGNOR MUSSOLINI 114 MR. LEON M. LION 121 SIR WILLIAM JOYNSON HICKS 129 MR. J. H. THOMAS 134 LADY ASTOR . . . - 139 SIR JOHN SIMON . 146 vii viii CONTENTS PAGE MR. J. M. KEYNES 152 MR. ARTHUR HENDERSON . . . . .158 MR. A. G. GARDINER 163 LORD MELCHETT 170 DR. T. R. GLOVER 178 MR. H. M. TOMLINSON 185 PREFACE BORED with the tedious journey through the Lancashire fog and smoke, the young Frenchman who was with me turned himself about to the clouded window of the railway carriage, and with his long forefinger drew upon it the counterfeit presentment of the huge navvy sitting in front of him. I was leaning over to remonstrate, not so much on the impudence, as on the extreme imprudence of his conduct for the navvy was of somewhat truculent aspect when the little mill girl by my side saw the picture upon the window and burst into peal upon peal of shrill laughter. The astounded navvy gazed heavily, first at her, and then at the French man. Then his eye caught the window. Ere, he said fiercely, tapping Henri upon the knee, what you been drawin Little moment, said Henri, working away feverishly at the window. But regard then, my good monsieur witha successful showmans triumphant ges ture regard then And he displayed upon the window-pane a really very creditable portrait, considering his limited means, of the laughing ix PREFACE mill girl Eh cried the navvy, gazing with open mouth and eyes, Eh As to the mill girl, she gave one glance at it and fell back, wrapping herself in her shawl her body shaken with convulsive quiverings, a Lancashire Niobe for a stranger would have said that she was weeping bitterly. 1 have not Henris artistic finger, and I can not flatter myself that my pictures upon the window-pane either deserve or will receive the acclaim which greeted his. I recall the incident merely to protect my poor little sketches from the charge of humourless impertinence. They are not an attempt to do again, still less to do hotter, what others have, in the case of many of my victims, done before. They are merely rough drawings of fellow travellers who have happened for a longer or a shorter time to be in the same compartment with me with one or two figures seen out of the window as I passed, and for one reason or another catching rny interest and attention, It has amused me to draw them it may amuse others to glance at the results. The collection is quite arbitrary it is not in any sense representative For symmetrys sake, I could wish it were more so. I should like, for instance to have included more women, but there happened to be few in the compartment. I should like again to have put in more young PREFACE xi men. But here I was in a difficulty. The well-known figures of to-day have nearly all been well-known for a long time. The figures that will be well-known in the future are not known at all to-day. There is a gap betweenthe two, like the starless space in the skies which astrono mers call the Coal Sack. And this is true, I believe, of all walks of life alike. In one Oxford college I know, for instance, there is a gap of twenty-one years between the youngest of the old dons and the oldest of the young ones.

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Portraits and Reflections - Stuart Hodgson
Vergriffenes Buch, derzeit bei uns nicht verfügbar.
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Stuart Hodgson:
Portraits and Reflections - Taschenbuch

ISBN: 1406745863

ID: 1170667968

[EAN: 9781406745863], Neubuch, [PU: Iyer Press], BRAND NEW PRINT ON DEMAND., Portraits and Reflections, Stuart Hodgson, REFLECTIS STUART HODGSON NEW YORK E. P. BUTTON COMPANY 681 FIFTH AVENUE TO MY WIFE WHO SO NEARLY NEVER SAW THE LITTLE BOOK IN WHICH SHE TOOK SUCH INTEREST CONTENTS PAGE PREFACE . . . Ix KING GEORGE V 13 MR. LLOYD GEORGE . 26 MONSIEUR ARISTIDE BRIAND . . . . 32 MR. WINSTON CHURCHILL . . . . . 39 LORD BlRKENHEAD . 49 MR. HENRY FORD . 56 MR. ROBERT LYND . 65 SENOR CAPAELANCA . . . . . . 73 SIR AUSTEN CHAMBERLAIN . . . . . .80 MR. Low 85 MR. ALFRED EMMANUEL SMITH . . . 91 MR. GARVIN . 102 CANON STREETER . . . . . . .109 SIGNOR MUSSOLINI 114 MR. LEON M. LION 121 SIR WILLIAM JOYNSON HICKS 129 MR. J. H. THOMAS 134 LADY ASTOR . . . - 139 SIR JOHN SIMON . 146 vii viii CONTENTS PAGE MR. J. M. KEYNES 152 MR. ARTHUR HENDERSON . . . . .158 MR. A. G. GARDINER 163 LORD MELCHETT 170 DR. T. R. GLOVER 178 MR. H. M. TOMLINSON 185 PREFACE BORED with the tedious journey through the Lancashire fog and smoke, the young Frenchman who was with me turned himself about to the clouded window of the railway carriage, and with his long forefinger drew upon it the counterfeit presentment of the huge navvy sitting in front of him. I was leaning over to remonstrate, not so much on the impudence, as on the extreme imprudence of his conduct for the navvy was of somewhat truculent aspect when the little mill girl by my side saw the picture upon the window and burst into peal upon peal of shrill laughter. The astounded navvy gazed heavily, first at her, and then at the French man. Then his eye caught the window. Ere, he said fiercely, tapping Henri upon the knee, what you been drawin Little moment, said Henri, working away feverishly at the window. But regard then, my good monsieur witha successful showmans triumphant ges ture regard then And he displayed upon the window-pane a really very creditable portrait, considering his limited means, of the laughing ix PREFACE mill girl Eh cried the navvy, gazing with open mouth and eyes, Eh As to the mill girl, she gave one glance at it and fell back, wrapping herself in her shawl her body shaken with convulsive quiverings, a Lancashire Niobe for a stranger would have said that she was weeping bitterly. 1 have not Henris artistic finger, and I can not flatter myself that my pictures upon the window-pane either deserve or will receive the acclaim which greeted his. I recall the incident merely to protect my poor little sketches from the charge of humourless impertinence. They are not an attempt to do again, still less to do hotter, what others have, in the case of many of my victims, done before. They are merely rough drawings of fellow travellers who have happened for a longer or a shorter time to be in the same compartment with me with one or two figures seen out of the window as I passed, and for one reason or another catching rny interest and attention, It has amused me to draw them it may amuse others to glance at the results. The collection is quite arbitrary it is not in any sense representative For symmetrys sake, I could wish it were more so. I should like, for instance to have included more women, but there happened to be few in the compartment. I should like again to have put in more young PREFACE xi men. But here I was in a difficulty. The well-known figures of to-day have nearly all been well-known for a long time. The figures that will be well-known in the future are not known at all to-day. There is a gap betweenthe two, like the starless space in the skies which astrono mers call the Coal Sack. And this is true, I believe, of all walks of life alike. In one Oxford college I know, for instance, there is a gap of twenty-one years between the youngest of the old dons and the oldest of the young ones.

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Hodgson, Stuart:
Portraits and Reflections - Taschenbuch

ISBN: 9781406745863

[ED: Taschenbuch], [PU: DODO PR], REFLECTIS STUART HODGSON NEW YORK E. P. BUTTON COMPANY 681 FIFTH AVENUE TO MY WIFE WHO SO NEARLY NEVER SAW THE LITTLE BOOK IN WHICH SHE TOOK SUCH INTEREST CONTENTS PAGE PREFACE . . . Ix KING GEORGE V 13 MR. LLOYD GEORGE ....... 26 MONSIEUR ARISTIDE BRIAND . . . . 32 MR. WINSTON CHURCHILL . . . . . 39 LORD BlRKENHEAD ....... 49 MR. HENRY FORD ....... 56 MR. ROBERT LYND ....... 65 SENOR CAPAELANCA . . . . . . 73 SIR AUSTEN CHAMBERLAIN . . . . . .80 MR. Low 85 MR. ALFRED EMMANUEL SMITH . . . 91 MR. GARVIN ........ 102 CANON STREETER . . . . . . .109 SIGNOR MUSSOLINI 114 MR. LEON M. LION 121 SIR WILLIAM JOYNSON HICKS 129 MR. J. H. THOMAS 134 LADY ASTOR . . . - 139 SIR JOHN SIMON ...... 146 vii viii CONTENTS PAGE MR. J. M. KEYNES 152 MR. ARTHUR HENDERSON . . . . .158 MR. A. G. GARDINER 163 LORD MELCHETT 170 DR. T. R. GLOVER 178 MR. H. M. TOMLINSON 185 PREFACE BORED with the tedious journey through the Lancashire fog and smoke, the young Frenchman who was with me turned himself about to the clouded window of the railway carriage, and with his long forefinger drew upon it the counterfeit presentment of the huge navvy sitting in front of him. I was leaning over to remonstrate, not so much on the impudence, as on the extreme imprudence of his conduct for the navvy was of somewhat truculent aspect when the little mill girl by my side saw the picture upon the window and burst into peal upon peal of shrill laughter. The astounded navvy gazed heavily, first at her, and then at the French man. Then his eye caught the window. Ere, he said fiercely, tapping Henri upon the knee, what you been drawin Little moment, said Henri, working away feverishly at the window. But regard then, my good monsieur witha successful showmans triumphant ges ture regard then And he displayed upon the window-pane a really very creditable portrait, considering his limited means, of the laughing ix PREFACE mill girl Eh cried the navvy, gazing with open mouth and eyes, Eh As to the mill girl, she gave one glance at it and fell back, wrapping herself in her shawl her body shaken with convulsive quiverings, a Lancashire Niobe for a stranger would have said that she was weeping bitterly. 1 have not Henris artistic finger, and I can not flatter myself that my pictures upon the window-pane either deserve or will receive the acclaim which greeted his. I recall the incident merely to protect my poor little sketches from the charge of humourless impertinence. They are not an attempt to do again, still less to do hotter, what others have, in the case of many of my victims, done before. They are merely rough drawings of fellow travellers who have happened for a longer or a shorter time to be in the same compartment with me with one or two figures seen out of the window as I passed, and for one reason or another catching rny interest and attention, It has amused me to draw them it may amuse others to glance at the results. The collection is quite arbitrary it is not in any sense representative For symmetrys sake, I could wish it were more so. I should like, for instance to have included more women, but there happened to be few in the compartment. I should like again to have put in more young PREFACE xi men. But here I was in a difficulty. The well-known figures of to-day have nearly all been well-known for a long time. The figures that will be well-known in the future are not known at all to-day. There is a gap betweenthe two, like the starless space in the skies which astrono mers call the Coal Sack. And this is true, I believe, of all walks of life alike. In one Oxford college I know, for instance, there is a gap of twenty-one years between the youngest of the old dons and the oldest of the young ones... Versandfertig in 6-10 Tagen, [SC: 0.00]

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Portraits and Reflections
Autor:

Hodgson, Stuart

Titel:

Portraits and Reflections

ISBN-Nummer:

9781406745863

REFLECTIS STUART HODGSON NEW YORK E. P. BUTTON COMPANY 681 FIFTH AVENUE TO MY WIFE WHO SO NEARLY NEVER SAW THE LITTLE BOOK IN WHICH SHE TOOK SUCH INTEREST CONTENTS PAGE PREFACE . . . Ix KING GEORGE V 13 MR. LLOYD GEORGE ....... 26 MONSIEUR ARISTIDE BRIAND . . . . 32 MR. WINSTON CHURCHILL . . . . . 39 LORD BlRKENHEAD ....... 49 MR. HENRY FORD ....... 56 MR. ROBERT LYND ....... 65 SENOR CAPAELANCA . . . . . . 73 SIR AUSTEN CHAMBERLAIN . . . . . .80 MR. Low 85 MR. ALFRED EMMANUEL SMITH . . . 91 MR. GARVIN ........ 102 CANON STREETER . . . . . . .109 SIGNOR MUSSOLINI 114 MR. LEON M. LION 121 SIR WILLIAM JOYNSON HICKS 129 MR. J. H. THOMAS 134 LADY ASTOR . . . - 139 SIR JOHN SIMON ...... 146 vii viii CONTENTS PAGE MR. J. M. KEYNES 152 MR. ARTHUR HENDERSON . . . . .158 MR. A. G. GARDINER 163 LORD MELCHETT 170 DR. T. R. GLOVER 178 MR. H. M. TOMLINSON 185 PREFACE BORED with the tedious journey through the Lancashire fog and smoke, the young Frenchman who was with me turned himself about to the clouded window of the railway carriage, and with his long forefinger drew upon it the counterfeit presentment of the huge navvy sitting in front of him. I was leaning over to remonstrate, not so much on the impudence, as on the extreme imprudence of his conduct for the navvy was of somewhat truculent aspect when the little mill girl by my side saw the picture upon the window and burst into peal upon peal of shrill laughter. The astounded navvy gazed heavily, first at her, and then at the French man. Then his eye caught the window. Ere, he said fiercely, tapping Henri upon the knee, what you been drawin Little moment, said Henri, working away feverishly at the window. But regard then, my good monsieur witha successful showmans triumphant ges ture regard then And he displayed upon the window-pane a really very creditable portrait, considering his limited means, of the laughing ix PREFACE mill girl Eh cried the navvy, gazing with open mouth and eyes, Eh As to the mill girl, she gave one glance at it and fell back, wrapping herself in her shawl her body shaken with convulsive quiverings, a Lancashire Niobe for a stranger would have said that she was weeping bitterly. 1 have not Henris artistic finger, and I can not flatter myself that my pictures upon the window-pane either deserve or will receive the acclaim which greeted his. I recall the incident merely to protect my poor little sketches from the charge of humourless impertinence. They are not an attempt to do again, still less to do hotter, what others have, in the case of many of my victims, done before. They are merely rough drawings of fellow travellers who have happened for a longer or a shorter time to be in the same compartment with me with one or two figures seen out of the window as I passed, and for one reason or another catching rny interest and attention, It has amused me to draw them it may amuse others to glance at the results. The collection is quite arbitrary it is not in any sense representative For symmetrys sake, I could wish it were more so. I should like, for instance to have included more women, but there happened to be few in the compartment. I should like again to have put in more young PREFACE xi men. But here I was in a difficulty. The well-known figures of to-day have nearly all been well-known for a long time. The figures that will be well-known in the future are not known at all to-day. There is a gap betweenthe two, like the starless space in the skies which astrono mers call the Coal Sack. And this is true, I believe, of all walks of life alike. In one Oxford college I know, for instance, there is a gap of twenty-one years between the youngest of the old dons and the oldest of the young ones...

Detailangaben zum Buch - Portraits and Reflections


EAN (ISBN-13): 9781406745863
ISBN (ISBN-10): 1406745863
Taschenbuch
Erscheinungsjahr: 2007
Herausgeber: DODO PR
192 Seiten
Gewicht: 0,249 kg
Sprache: eng/Englisch

Buch in der Datenbank seit 07.11.2007 09:10:49
Buch zuletzt gefunden am 09.05.2012 12:31:42
ISBN/EAN: 9781406745863

ISBN - alternative Schreibweisen:
1-4067-4586-3, 978-1-4067-4586-3

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