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Pop-culture neologisms - Source
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Pop-culture neologisms - Taschenbuch

2011, ISBN: 1156571022

ID: 9395652827

[EAN: 9781156571026], Neubuch, [PU: Reference Series Books Llc Nov 2011], LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / LIBRARY INFORMATION SCIENCE, This item is printed on demand - Print on Demand Titel. - Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 47. Chapters: Snowclones, The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, Pompatus, Yakov Smirnoff, List of scandals with '-gate' suffix, Truthiness, Have Gun-Will Travel, Military-industrial complex, Metrosexual, The Little Engine That Could, 50,000,000 Elvis Fans Can't Be Wrong, Eskimo words for snow, Dude, Where's My Car , The new black, Considered harmful, Jumping the shark, What would Jesus do , Regift, Got Milk , Earworm, Breakin' 2: Electric Boogaloo, TPS report, Every time you masturbate. God kills a kitten, Friend, It's the economy, stupid, The mother of all, No Sex Please, We're British, Thy name is, Very good very mighty, Machosexual, Neosexual, War to End All Wars. Excerpt: This is a list of actual or alleged scandals or controversies named with a '-gate' suffix, by analogy with the Watergate scandal. The suffix -gate derives from the Watergate scandal of the United States in the early 1970s, which resulted in the resignation of U.S. President Richard Nixon. Watergate itself does not follow the -gate construction. The scandal was named after the Watergate complex in Washington, D.C.; the complex itself was named after the 'Water Gate' area where symphony orchestra concerts were staged on the Potomac River between 1935 and 1965. In 18th century Ireland, Richard Barry, 7th Earl of Barrymore was nicknamed 'Hellgate', and his siblings Henry, Augustus and Carolina were nicknamed Cripplegate, Newgate and Billingsgate respectively, due to their scandalous behaviour. All of these nicknames, except for 'Hellgate', were after gates in the walls of the City of London. The suffix is used to embellish a noun or name to suggest the existence of a far-reaching scandal. As a CBC News Online column noted in 2001, the term may 'suggest unethical behaviour and a cover-up'. The same usage has spread into languages other than English; examples of -gate being used to refer to local political scandals have been reported from Argentina, Germany, Hungary, Greece and the former Yugoslavia. Such usages have been criticised by commentators as clichéd and misleading; James Stanyer comments that 'revelations are given the 'gate' suffix to add a thin veil of credibility, following 'Watergate', but most bear no resemblance to the painstaking investigation of that particular piece of presidential corruption.' Stanyer links the widespread use of -gate to what the sociologist John Thompson calls 'scandal syndrome': The adoption of -gate to suggest the existence of a scandal was promoted by William Safire, the conservative New York Times columnist and former Nixon administration speechwriter. As early as September 1974 he wrote of 'Vietgate', a proposed pardon of the Wat 48 pp. Englisch

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Pop-culture neologisms - Source
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Pop-culture neologisms - Taschenbuch

2011, ISBN: 1156571022

ID: 9395652827

[EAN: 9781156571026], Neubuch, [PU: Reference Series Books Llc Nov 2011], LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES / LIBRARY INFORMATION SCIENCE, This item is printed on demand - Print on Demand Titel. - Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 47. Chapters: Snowclones, The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, Pompatus, Yakov Smirnoff, List of scandals with '-gate' suffix, Truthiness, Have Gun-Will Travel, Military-industrial complex, Metrosexual, The Little Engine That Could, 50,000,000 Elvis Fans Can't Be Wrong, Eskimo words for snow, Dude, Where's My Car , The new black, Considered harmful, Jumping the shark, What would Jesus do , Regift, Got Milk , Earworm, Breakin' 2: Electric Boogaloo, TPS report, Every time you masturbate. God kills a kitten, Friend, It's the economy, stupid, The mother of all, No Sex Please, We're British, Thy name is, Very good very mighty, Machosexual, Neosexual, War to End All Wars. Excerpt: This is a list of actual or alleged scandals or controversies named with a '-gate' suffix, by analogy with the Watergate scandal. The suffix -gate derives from the Watergate scandal of the United States in the early 1970s, which resulted in the resignation of U.S. President Richard Nixon. Watergate itself does not follow the -gate construction. The scandal was named after the Watergate complex in Washington, D.C.; the complex itself was named after the 'Water Gate' area where symphony orchestra concerts were staged on the Potomac River between 1935 and 1965. In 18th century Ireland, Richard Barry, 7th Earl of Barrymore was nicknamed 'Hellgate', and his siblings Henry, Augustus and Carolina were nicknamed Cripplegate, Newgate and Billingsgate respectively, due to their scandalous behaviour. All of these nicknames, except for 'Hellgate', were after gates in the walls of the City of London. The suffix is used to embellish a noun or name to suggest the existence of a far-reaching scandal. As a CBC News Online column noted in 2001, the term may 'suggest unethical behaviour and a cover-up'. The same usage has spread into languages other than English; examples of -gate being used to refer to local political scandals have been reported from Argentina, Germany, Hungary, Greece and the former Yugoslavia. Such usages have been criticised by commentators as clichéd and misleading; James Stanyer comments that 'revelations are given the 'gate' suffix to add a thin veil of credibility, following 'Watergate', but most bear no resemblance to the painstaking investigation of that particular piece of presidential corruption.' Stanyer links the widespread use of -gate to what the sociologist John Thompson calls 'scandal syndrome': The adoption of -gate to suggest the existence of a scandal was promoted by William Safire, the conservative New York Times columnist and former Nixon administration speechwriter. As early as September 1974 he wrote of 'Vietgate', a proposed pardon of the Wat 48 pp. Englisch

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[ED: Pappeinband], [PU: Bertrams Print On Demand], - Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 47. Chapters: Snowclones, The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, Pompatus, Yakov Smirnoff, List of scandals with -gate suffix, Truthiness, Have Gun-Will Travel, Military-industrial complex, Metrosexual, The Little Engine That Could, 50,000,000 Elvis Fans Can't Be Wrong, Eskimo words for snow, Dude, Where's My Car, The new black, Considered harmful, Jumping the shark, What would Jesus do, Regift, Got Milk, Earworm, Breakin' 2: Electric Boogaloo, TPS report, Every time you masturbate... God kills a kitten, Friend, It's the economy, stupid, The mother of all, No Sex Please, We're British, Thy name is, Very good very mighty, Machosexual, Neosexual, War to End All Wars. Excerpt: This is a list of actual or alleged scandals or controversies named with a -gate suffix, by analogy with the Watergate scandal. The suffix -gate derives from the Watergate scandal of the United States in the early 1970s, which resulted in the resignation of U.S. President Richard Nixon. Watergate itself does not follow the -gate construction. The scandal was named after the Watergate complex in Washington, D.C. the complex itself was named after the Water Gate area where symphony orchestra concerts were staged on the Potomac River between 1935 and 1965. In 18th century Ireland, Richard Barry, 7th Earl of Barrymore was nicknamed Hellgate, and his siblings Henry, Augustus and Carolina were nicknamed Cripplegate, Newgate and Billingsgate respectively, due to their scandalous behaviour. All of these nicknames, except for Hellgate, were after gates in the walls of the City of London. The suffix is used to embellish a noun or name to suggest the existence of a far-reaching scandal. As a CBC News Online column noted in 2001, the term may suggest unethical behaviour and a cover-up. The same usage has spread into languages other than English examples of -gate being used to refer to local political scandals have been reported from Argentina, Germany, Hungary, Greece and the former Yugoslavia. Such usages have been criticised by commentators as clichéd and misleading James Stanyer comments that revelations are given the 'gate' suffix to add a thin veil of credibility, following 'Watergate', but most bear no resemblance to the painstaking investigation of that particular piece of presidential corruption. Stanyer links the widespread use of -gate to what the sociologist John Thompson calls scandal syndrome: The adoption of -gate to suggest the existence of a scandal was promoted by William Safire, the conservative New York Times columnist and former Nixon administration speechwriter. As early as September 1974 he wrote of Vietgate, a proposed pardon of the Wat - Besorgungstitel - vorauss. Lieferzeit 3-5 Tage.., [SC: 0.00]

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2007, ISBN: 9781156571026

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Purchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publisher's book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: Pompatus, Truthiness, Metrosexual, Jumping the Shark, Regift, Earworm, Machosexual, Tps Report, Shout-Out, Neosexual, Unfriend. Excerpt: Earworm, a loan translation of the German Ohrwurm, is a portion of a song or other music that repeats compulsively within one's mind, put colloquially as "music Purchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publisher's book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: Pompatus, Truthiness, Metrosexual, Jumping the Shark, Regift, Earworm, Machosexual, Tps Report, Shout-Out, Neosexual, Unfriend. Excerpt: Earworm, a loan translation of the German Ohrwurm, is a portion of a song or other music that repeats compulsively within one's mind, put colloquially as "music being stuck in one's head." Use of the English translation was popularized by James Kellaris, a marketing researcher at the University of Cincinnati, and Daniel Levitin. Kellaris' studies demonstrated that different people have varying susceptibilities to earworms, but that almost everybody has been afflicted with one at some time or another. The psychoanalyst Theodor Reik used the term haunting melody to describe the psychodynamic features of the phenomenon. Another scientific term for the phenomenon, involuntary musical imagery, or INMI, was suggested by the neurologist Oliver Sacks in 2007. Wanted Words, a feature on CBC Radio One 's This Morning hosted by Jane Farrow, also once asked listeners to invent a word for this phenomenon. Submitted entries included "aneurhythm" and "humbug." The Official Earworm Synonym List includes alternative terms such as "music meme", "humsickness" , "repetunitis", "obsessive musical thought" and "tune wedgy." People with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) are more likely to report being troubled by ear worms - in some cases, medications for OCD can minimize the effects. Earworms should not be confused with endomusia or musical hallucinations, a serious affliction, through which a sufferer actually hears music that is not playing externally. See also (online edition) References (URLs online) Websites (URLs online) A hyperlinked version of this chapter is at Jumping the shark is an idiom used to describe the moment of downturn for a Books, , Pop-Culture-Neologisms~~Books-Llc, 999999999, Pop-Culture Neologisms, Books Llc, 1156571022, General Books LLC, , , , , General Books LLC

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2007, ISBN: 9781156571026

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Purchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publisher's book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: Pompatus, Truthiness, Metrosexual, Jumping the Shark, Regift, Earworm, Machosexual, Tps Report, Shout-Out, Neosexual, Unfriend. Excerpt: Earworm, a loan translation of the German Ohrwurm, is a portion of a song or other music that repeats compulsively within one's mind, put colloquially as "music Purchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publisher's book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: Pompatus, Truthiness, Metrosexual, Jumping the Shark, Regift, Earworm, Machosexual, Tps Report, Shout-Out, Neosexual, Unfriend. Excerpt: Earworm, a loan translation of the German Ohrwurm, is a portion of a song or other music that repeats compulsively within one's mind, put colloquially as "music being stuck in one's head." Use of the English translation was popularized by James Kellaris, a marketing researcher at the University of Cincinnati, and Daniel Levitin. Kellaris' studies demonstrated that different people have varying susceptibilities to earworms, but that almost everybody has been afflicted with one at some time or another. The psychoanalyst Theodor Reik used the term haunting melody to describe the psychodynamic features of the phenomenon. Another scientific term for the phenomenon, involuntary musical imagery, or INMI, was suggested by the neurologist Oliver Sacks in 2007. Wanted Words, a feature on CBC Radio One 's This Morning hosted by Jane Farrow, also once asked listeners to invent a word for this phenomenon. Submitted entries included "aneurhythm" and "humbug." The Official Earworm Synonym List includes alternative terms such as "music meme", "humsickness" , "repetunitis", "obsessive musical thought" and "tune wedgy." People with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) are more likely to report being troubled by ear worms - in some cases, medications for OCD can minimize the effects. Earworms should not be confused with endomusia or musical hallucinations, a serious affliction, through which a sufferer actually hears music that is not playing externally. See also (online edition) References (URLs online) Websites (URLs online) A hyperlinked version of this chapter is at Jumping the shark is an idiom used to describe the moment of downturn for a Books, , Pop-Culture-Neologisms~~Books-Llc, , , , , , , , , , General Books LLC

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Pop-Culture Neologisms: Truthiness
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Pop-Culture Neologisms: Truthiness

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EAN (ISBN-13): 9781156571026
ISBN (ISBN-10): 1156571022
Taschenbuch
Erscheinungsjahr: 2010
Herausgeber: LIFE JOURNEY
58 Seiten
Gewicht: 0,100 kg
Sprache: eng/Englisch

Buch in der Datenbank seit 29.11.2011 12:41:36
Buch zuletzt gefunden am 05.08.2015 00:39:22
ISBN/EAN: 9781156571026

ISBN - alternative Schreibweisen:
1-156-57102-2, 978-1-156-57102-6

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