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Prefaces/Writing Sampler - Kierkegaard, Søren
Vergriffenes Buch, derzeit bei uns nicht verfügbar.
(*)
Kierkegaard, Søren:

Prefaces/Writing Sampler - gebunden oder broschiert

1998, ISBN: 9780691048277

ID: 229650977

New York: Putnams, 1930. Second printing. Hardcover. Good +. Emil Ludwig , pseudonym for renowned biographer, Emil Cohn ( 1881 - 1948 ), Correspondent, journalist, famous for biographies of Napoleon, Hohenzollern, Bismarck, Goethe, considered dangerous by Goebbels; an evocative biographer and engaging writer, Frontispiece: Profile of Michael Angelo. Contents: Michael Angelo, in 5 chapters. Rembrandt ( The Son of the Mill - Conquests - Lord of Life - The Secret King - The Beggar) - Beethoven ( A Serious Boy - Genius and Society - The Fight With Fate - Catastrophes - Pallida Mors ). Index With striking illustrations, on plates, including :Micael Angelo portrait and Michael Angelo: Self-portrait - Two Rembrandt Portraits - Beethoven as a Young man and of Beethoven portrait. Black textured cloth book with red border designs, gilt lettering on cover and on spine. ( 5 7/8 X 9 X 1 5/8 ) 363 pages Cover corner wear. Book weighs 1 3/4 pounds sku 616, Putnams, 1930, Princeton. 1998. Princeton University Press. 1st American Edition. Very Good In Dustjacket. Translated from the Danish, Edited, and With An Introduction & Notes by Todd W. Nichol. 211 pages. March 1998. hardcover. Cover design by Frank Mahood. 0691048274. keywords: Literature Denmark Scandinavia Philosophy Religion Translated. inventory # 35103. FROM THE PUBLISHER - Prefaces was the last of four books by Søren Kierkegaard to appear within a space of two weeks in June 1844. Three Upbuilding Discourses and Philosophical Fragments were published first, followed by The Concept of Anxiety. This last volume, altlhough it had the usual complement of an upbuilding work, also had a companion of a different kind, the comically ironic Prefaces, published on the same day. Presented as a set of prefaces without a book to follow, this work is a satire on literary life in nineteenth-century Copenhagen, a lampoon of Danish Hegelianism, and a prefiguring of Kierkegaard’s final collision with Danish Christendom. At the same time it tightly expresses themes characteristic of the entire authorship, including subjectivity and Christian devotion. Shortly after publishing Prefaces, Kierkegaard began to prepare Writing Sampler as a sequel. This next work considers the themes of Prefaces but in yet a more ironical and satirical vein. Writing Sampler remained among Kierkegaard’s unpublished writings during his lifetime and appears here for the first time as Kierkegaard originally envisioned it, in the company of Prefaces. Søren Aabye Kierkegaard (5 May 1813 – 11 November 1855) was a prolific 19th century Danish philosopher and theologian. Kierkegaard strongly criticized both the Hegelianism of his time, and what he saw as the empty formalities of the Danish church. Much of his work deals with religious problems such as faith in God, the institution of the Christian Church, Christian ethics and theology, and the emotions and feelings of individuals when faced with life choices. His early work was written under various pseudonyms who present their own distinctive viewpoints in a complex dialogue. Kierkegaard left the task of discovering the meaning of the works to the reader, because ‘the task must be made difficult, for only the difficult inspires the noble-hearted’. Subsequently, many have interpreted Kierkegaard as an existentialist, neo-orthodoxist, postmodernist, humanist, individualist, etc. Crossing the boundaries of philosophy, theology, psychology, and literature, Kierkegaard came to be regarded as a highly significant and influential figure in contemporary thought. Kierkegaard has been called a philosopher, a theologian, the Father of Existentialism, a literary critic, a humorist, a psychologist, and a poet. Two of his popular ideas are ‘subjectivity’, and the ‘leap to faith,’ popularly referred to as the ‘leap of faith.’ The leap of faith is his conception of how an individual would believe in God, or how a person would act in love. It is not a rational decision, as it is transcending rationality in favour of something more uncanny, that is, faith. As such he thought that to have faith is at the same time to have doubt. So, for example, for one to truly have faith in God, one would also have to doubt that God exists; the doubt is the rational part of a person’s thought, without which the faith would have no real substance. Doubt is an essential element of faith, an underpinning. In plain words, to believe or have faith that God exists, without ever having doubted God’s existence or goodness, would not be a faith worth having. For example, it takes no faith to believe that a pencil or a table exists, when one is looking at it and touching it. In the same way, to believe or have faith in God is to know that one has no perceptual or any other access to God, and yet still has faith in God. Kierkegaard also stressed the importance of the self, and the self’s relation to the world as being grounded in self-reflection and introspection. He argued in Concluding Unscientific Postscript to Philosophical Fragments that ‘subjectivity is truth’ and ‘truth is subjectivity.’ This has to do with a distinction between what is objectively true and an individual’s subjective relation (such as indifference or commitment) to that truth. People who in some sense believe the same things may relate to those beliefs quite differently. Two individuals may both believe that many of those around them are poor and deserve help, but this knowledge may lead only one of them to decide to actually help the poor. Kierkegaard primarily discusses subjectivity with regard to religious matters, however. As already noted, he argues that doubt is an element of faith and that it is impossible to gain any objective certainty about religious doctrines such as the existence of God or the life of Christ. The most one could hope for would be the conclusion that it is probable that the Christian doctrines are true, but if a person were to believe such doctrines only to the degree they seemed likely to be true, he or she would not be genuinely religious at all. Faith consists in a subjective relation of absolute commitment to these doctrines. Either/Or, one of Kierkegaard’s works, was authored under the pseudonyms ‘A’ and ‘B,’ or Judge William, and edited under the pseudonym Victor Eremita. Half of Kierkegaard’s authorship was written behind the mask of several pseudonymous characters he created to represent different ways of thinking. This was part of Kierkegaard’s indirect communication. According to several passages in his works and journals, such as The Point of View of My Work as an Author, Kierkegaard wrote this way in order to prevent his works from being treated as a philosophical system with a systematic structure. In the Point of View, Kierkegaard wrote: ‘In the pseudonymous works, there is not a single word which is mine. I have no opinion about these works except as a third person, no knowledge of their meaning, except as a reader, not the remotest private relation to them.’ Kierkegaard used indirect communication to make it difficult to ascertain whether he actually held any of the views presented in his works. He hoped readers would simply read the work at face value without attributing it to some aspect of his life. Kierkegaard also did not want his readers to treat his work as an authoritative system, but rather look to themselves for interpretation. Early Kierkegaardian scholars, such as Theodor W. Adorno, have disregarded Kierkegaard’s intentions and argue the entire authorship should be treated as Kierkegaard’s own personal and religious views. This view leads to many confusions and contradictions which make Kierkegaard appear incoherent. However, many later scholars such as the post-structuralists, have respected Kierkegaard’s intentions and interpreted his work by attributing the pseudonymous texts to their respective authors. Kierkegaard’s final years were taken up with a sustained, outright attack on the Danish People’s Church by means of newspaper articles published in The Fatherland (F'drelandet) and a series of self-published pamphlets called The Moment (Øjeblikket) Kierkegaard was initially called to action after Professor Hans Lassen Martensen gave a speech in church in which he called his recently deceased predecessor Bishop Jakob P. Mynster a ‘truth-witness, one of the authentic truth-witnesses.’ Kierkegaard had an affection towards Mynster, but had come to see that his conception of Christianity was in man’s interest, rather than God’s, and in no way was Mynster’s life comparable to that of a ‘truth-witness.’ Before the tenth chapter of The Moment could be published, Kierkegaard collapsed on the street and was eventually taken to a hospital. He stayed in the hospital for over a month and refused to receive communion from a pastor, whom Kierkegaard regarded as merely an official and not a servant of God. He said to Emil Boesen, a friend since childhood who kept a record of his conversations with Kierkegaard and was himself a pastor, that his life had been one of great and unknown suffering, which looked like vanity to others but was not. Kierkegaard died in Frederik’s Hospital after being there for over a month, possibly from complications from a fall he had taken from a tree when he was a boy. He was interred in the Assistens Kirkegård in the Nørrebro section of Copenhagen. At Kierkegaard’s funeral, his nephew Henrik Lund caused a disturbance by protesting that Kierkegaard was being buried by the official church even though in his life he had broken from and denounced it. Lund was later fined. . ISBN: 0691048274.

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Prefaces/Writing Sampler - Kierkegaard, Søren
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Kierkegaard, Søren:

Prefaces/Writing Sampler - gebunden oder broschiert

1998, ISBN: 9780691048277

ID: 642271766

Hassocks: The Harvester Press, 1977. Large octavo, xv + 335pp. Mild rubbing at dustwrapper, minor marginal chipping. No significant defects, book very good. A sound copy.. First Edition. Hard Cover., The Harvester Press, 1977, Princeton. 1998. Princeton University Press. 1st American Edition. Very Good In Dustjacket. Translated from the Danish, Edited, and With An Introduction & Notes by Todd W. Nichol. 211 pages. March 1998. hardcover. Cover design by Frank Mahood. 0691048274. keywords: Literature Denmark Scandinavia Philosophy Religion Translated. inventory # 35103. FROM THE PUBLISHER - Prefaces was the last of four books by Søren Kierkegaard to appear within a space of two weeks in June 1844. Three Upbuilding Discourses and Philosophical Fragments were published first, followed by The Concept of Anxiety. This last volume, altlhough it had the usual complement of an upbuilding work, also had a companion of a different kind, the comically ironic Prefaces, published on the same day. Presented as a set of prefaces without a book to follow, this work is a satire on literary life in nineteenth-century Copenhagen, a lampoon of Danish Hegelianism, and a prefiguring of Kierkegaard’s final collision with Danish Christendom. At the same time it tightly expresses themes characteristic of the entire authorship, including subjectivity and Christian devotion. Shortly after publishing Prefaces, Kierkegaard began to prepare Writing Sampler as a sequel. This next work considers the themes of Prefaces but in yet a more ironical and satirical vein. Writing Sampler remained among Kierkegaard’s unpublished writings during his lifetime and appears here for the first time as Kierkegaard originally envisioned it, in the company of Prefaces. Søren Aabye Kierkegaard (5 May 1813 – 11 November 1855) was a prolific 19th century Danish philosopher and theologian. Kierkegaard strongly criticized both the Hegelianism of his time, and what he saw as the empty formalities of the Danish church. Much of his work deals with religious problems such as faith in God, the institution of the Christian Church, Christian ethics and theology, and the emotions and feelings of individuals when faced with life choices. His early work was written under various pseudonyms who present their own distinctive viewpoints in a complex dialogue. Kierkegaard left the task of discovering the meaning of the works to the reader, because ‘the task must be made difficult, for only the difficult inspires the noble-hearted’. Subsequently, many have interpreted Kierkegaard as an existentialist, neo-orthodoxist, postmodernist, humanist, individualist, etc. Crossing the boundaries of philosophy, theology, psychology, and literature, Kierkegaard came to be regarded as a highly significant and influential figure in contemporary thought. Kierkegaard has been called a philosopher, a theologian, the Father of Existentialism, a literary critic, a humorist, a psychologist, and a poet. Two of his popular ideas are ‘subjectivity’, and the ‘leap to faith,’ popularly referred to as the ‘leap of faith.’ The leap of faith is his conception of how an individual would believe in God, or how a person would act in love. It is not a rational decision, as it is transcending rationality in favour of something more uncanny, that is, faith. As such he thought that to have faith is at the same time to have doubt. So, for example, for one to truly have faith in God, one would also have to doubt that God exists; the doubt is the rational part of a person’s thought, without which the faith would have no real substance. Doubt is an essential element of faith, an underpinning. In plain words, to believe or have faith that God exists, without ever having doubted God’s existence or goodness, would not be a faith worth having. For example, it takes no faith to believe that a pencil or a table exists, when one is looking at it and touching it. In the same way, to believe or have faith in God is to know that one has no perceptual or any other access to God, and yet still has faith in God. Kierkegaard also stressed the importance of the self, and the self’s relation to the world as being grounded in self-reflection and introspection. He argued in Concluding Unscientific Postscript to Philosophical Fragments that ‘subjectivity is truth’ and ‘truth is subjectivity.’ This has to do with a distinction between what is objectively true and an individual’s subjective relation (such as indifference or commitment) to that truth. People who in some sense believe the same things may relate to those beliefs quite differently. Two individuals may both believe that many of those around them are poor and deserve help, but this knowledge may lead only one of them to decide to actually help the poor. Kierkegaard primarily discusses subjectivity with regard to religious matters, however. As already noted, he argues that doubt is an element of faith and that it is impossible to gain any objective certainty about religious doctrines such as the existence of God or the life of Christ. The most one could hope for would be the conclusion that it is probable that the Christian doctrines are true, but if a person were to believe such doctrines only to the degree they seemed likely to be true, he or she would not be genuinely religious at all. Faith consists in a subjective relation of absolute commitment to these doctrines. Either/Or, one of Kierkegaard’s works, was authored under the pseudonyms ‘A’ and ‘B,’ or Judge William, and edited under the pseudonym Victor Eremita. Half of Kierkegaard’s authorship was written behind the mask of several pseudonymous characters he created to represent different ways of thinking. This was part of Kierkegaard’s indirect communication. According to several passages in his works and journals, such as The Point of View of My Work as an Author, Kierkegaard wrote this way in order to prevent his works from being treated as a philosophical system with a systematic structure. In the Point of View, Kierkegaard wrote: ‘In the pseudonymous works, there is not a single word which is mine. I have no opinion about these works except as a third person, no knowledge of their meaning, except as a reader, not the remotest private relation to them.’ Kierkegaard used indirect communication to make it difficult to ascertain whether he actually held any of the views presented in his works. He hoped readers would simply read the work at face value without attributing it to some aspect of his life. Kierkegaard also did not want his readers to treat his work as an authoritative system, but rather look to themselves for interpretation. Early Kierkegaardian scholars, such as Theodor W. Adorno, have disregarded Kierkegaard’s intentions and argue the entire authorship should be treated as Kierkegaard’s own personal and religious views. This view leads to many confusions and contradictions which make Kierkegaard appear incoherent. However, many later scholars such as the post-structuralists, have respected Kierkegaard’s intentions and interpreted his work by attributing the pseudonymous texts to their respective authors. Kierkegaard’s final years were taken up with a sustained, outright attack on the Danish People’s Church by means of newspaper articles published in The Fatherland (F'drelandet) and a series of self-published pamphlets called The Moment (Øjeblikket) Kierkegaard was initially called to action after Professor Hans Lassen Martensen gave a speech in church in which he called his recently deceased predecessor Bishop Jakob P. Mynster a ‘truth-witness, one of the authentic truth-witnesses.’ Kierkegaard had an affection towards Mynster, but had come to see that his conception of Christianity was in man’s interest, rather than God’s, and in no way was Mynster’s life comparable to that of a ‘truth-witness.’ Before the tenth chapter of The Moment could be published, Kierkegaard collapsed on the street and was eventually taken to a hospital. He stayed in the hospital for over a month and refused to receive communion from a pastor, whom Kierkegaard regarded as merely an official and not a servant of God. He said to Emil Boesen, a friend since childhood who kept a record of his conversations with Kierkegaard and was himself a pastor, that his life had been one of great and unknown suffering, which looked like vanity to others but was not. Kierkegaard died in Frederik’s Hospital after being there for over a month, possibly from complications from a fall he had taken from a tree when he was a boy. He was interred in the Assistens Kirkegård in the Nørrebro section of Copenhagen. At Kierkegaard’s funeral, his nephew Henrik Lund caused a disturbance by protesting that Kierkegaard was being buried by the official church even though in his life he had broken from and denounced it. Lund was later fined. . ISBN: 0691048274.

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Prefaces/Writing Sampler - Kierkegaard, Søren
Vergriffenes Buch, derzeit bei uns nicht verfügbar.
(*)
Kierkegaard, Søren:
Prefaces/Writing Sampler - gebunden oder broschiert

1998

ISBN: 9780691048277

ID: 600681058

Princeton. 1998. Princeton University Press. 1st American Edition. Very Good In Dustjacket. Translated from the Danish, Edited, and With An Introduction & Notes by Todd W. Nichol. 211 pages. March 1998. hardcover. Cover design by Frank Mahood. 0691048274. keywords: Literature Denmark Scandinavia Philosophy Religion Translated. inventory # 35103. FROM THE PUBLISHER - Prefaces was the last of four books by Søren Kierkegaard to appear within a space of two weeks in June 1844. Three Upbuilding Discourses and Philosophical Fragments were published first, followed by The Concept of Anxiety. This last volume, altlhough it had the usual complement of an upbuilding work, also had a companion of a different kind, the comically ironic Prefaces, published on the same day. Presented as a set of prefaces without a book to follow, this work is a satire on literary life in nineteenth-century Copenhagen, a lampoon of Danish Hegelianism, and a prefiguring of Kierkegaard’s final collision with Danish Christendom. At the same time it tightly expresses themes characteristic of the entire authorship, including subjectivity and Christian devotion. Shortly after publishing Prefaces, Kierkegaard began to prepare Writing Sampler as a sequel. This next work considers the themes of Prefaces but in yet a more ironical and satirical vein. Writing Sampler remained among Kierkegaard’s unpublished writings during his lifetime and appears here for the first time as Kierkegaard originally envisioned it, in the company of Prefaces. Søren Aabye Kierkegaard (5 May 1813 – 11 November 1855) was a prolific 19th century Danish philosopher and theologian. Kierkegaard strongly criticized both the Hegelianism of his time, and what he saw as the empty formalities of the Danish church. Much of his work deals with religious problems such as faith in God, the institution of the Christian Church, Christian ethics and theology, and the emotions and feelings of individuals when faced with life choices. His early work was written under various pseudonyms who present their own distinctive viewpoints in a complex dialogue. Kierkegaard left the task of discovering the meaning of the works to the reader, because ‘the task must be made difficult, for only the difficult inspires the noble-hearted’. Subsequently, many have interpreted Kierkegaard as an existentialist, neo-orthodoxist, postmodernist, humanist, individualist, etc. Crossing the boundaries of philosophy, theology, psychology, and literature, Kierkegaard came to be regarded as a highly significant and influential figure in contemporary thought. Kierkegaard has been called a philosopher, a theologian, the Father of Existentialism, a literary critic, a humorist, a psychologist, and a poet. Two of his popular ideas are ‘subjectivity’, and the ‘leap to faith,’ popularly referred to as the ‘leap of faith.’ The leap of faith is his conception of how an individual would believe in God, or how a person would act in love. It is not a rational decision, as it is transcending rationality in favour of something more uncanny, that is, faith. As such he thought that to have faith is at the same time to have doubt. So, for example, for one to truly have faith in God, one would also have to doubt that God exists; the doubt is the rational part of a person’s thought, without which the faith would have no real substance. Doubt is an essential element of faith, an underpinning. In plain words, to believe or have faith that God exists, without ever having doubted God’s existence or goodness, would not be a faith worth having. For example, it takes no faith to believe that a pencil or a table exists, when one is looking at it and touching it. In the same way, to believe or have faith in God is to know that one has no perceptual or any other access to God, and yet still has faith in God. Kierkegaard also stressed the importance of the self, and the self’s relation to the world as being grounded in self-reflection and introspection. He argued in Concluding Unscientific Postscript to Philosophical Fragments that ‘subjectivity is truth’ and ‘truth is subjectivity.’ This has to do with a distinction between what is objectively true and an individual’s subjective relation (such as indifference or commitment) to that truth. People who in some sense believe the same things may relate to those beliefs quite differently. Two individuals may both believe that many of those around them are poor and deserve help, but this knowledge may lead only one of them to decide to actually help the poor. Kierkegaard primarily discusses subjectivity with regard to religious matters, however. As already noted, he argues that doubt is an element of faith and that it is impossible to gain any objective certainty about religious doctrines such as the existence of God or the life of Christ. The most one could hope for would be the conclusion that it is probable that the Christian doctrines are true, but if a person were to believe such doctrines only to the degree they seemed likely to be true, he or she would not be genuinely religious at all. Faith consists in a subjective relation of absolute commitment to these doctrines. Either/Or, one of Kierkegaard’s works, was authored under the pseudonyms ‘A’ and ‘B,’ or Judge William, and edited under the pseudonym Victor Eremita. Half of Kierkegaard’s authorship was written behind the mask of several pseudonymous characters he created to represent different ways of thinking. This was part of Kierkegaard’s indirect communication. According to several passages in his works and journals, such as The Point of View of My Work as an Author, Kierkegaard wrote this way in order to prevent his works from being treated as a philosophical system with a systematic structure. In the Point of View, Kierkegaard wrote: ‘In the pseudonymous works, there is not a single word which is mine. I have no opinion about these works except as a third person, no knowledge of their meaning, except as a reader, not the remotest private relation to them.’ Kierkegaard used indirect communication to make it difficult to ascertain whether he actually held any of the views presented in his works. He hoped readers would simply read the work at face value without attributing it to some aspect of his life. Kierkegaard also did not want his readers to treat his work as an authoritative system, but rather look to themselves for interpretation. Early Kierkegaardian scholars, such as Theodor W. Adorno, have disregarded Kierkegaard’s intentions and argue the entire authorship should be treated as Kierkegaard’s own personal and religious views. This view leads to many confusions and contradictions which make Kierkegaard appear incoherent. However, many later scholars such as the post-structuralists, have respected Kierkegaard’s intentions and interpreted his work by attributing the pseudonymous texts to their respective authors. Kierkegaard’s final years were taken up with a sustained, outright attack on the Danish People’s Church by means of newspaper articles published in The Fatherland (F'drelandet) and a series of self-published pamphlets called The Moment (Øjeblikket) Kierkegaard was initially called to action after Professor Hans Lassen Martensen gave a speech in church in which he called his recently deceased predecessor Bishop Jakob P. Mynster a ‘truth-witness, one of the authentic truth-witnesses.’ Kierkegaard had an affection towards Mynster, but had come to see that his conception of Christianity was in man’s interest, rather than God’s, and in no way was Mynster’s life comparable to that of a ‘truth-witness.’ Before the tenth chapter of The Moment could be published, Kierkegaard collapsed on the street and was eventually taken to a hospital. He stayed in the hospital for over a month and refused to receive communion from a pastor, whom Kierkegaard regarded as merely an official and not a servant of God. He said to Emil Boesen, a friend since childhood who kept a record of his conversations with Kierkegaard and was himself a pastor, that his life had been one of great and unknown suffering, which looked like vanity to others but was not. Kierkegaard died in Frederik’s Hospital after being there for over a month, possibly from complications from a fall he had taken from a tree when he was a boy. He was interred in the Assistens Kirkegård in the Nørrebro section of Copenhagen. At Kierkegaard’s funeral, his nephew Henrik Lund caused a disturbance by protesting that Kierkegaard was being buried by the official church even though in his life he had broken from and denounced it. Lund was later fined. . ISBN: 0691048274.

gebrauchtes bzw. antiquarisches Buch Biblio.com
Zeno's
Versandkosten: EUR 21.34
Details...
(*) Derzeit vergriffen bedeutet, dass dieser Titel momentan auf keiner der angeschlossenen Plattform verfügbar ist.
Prefaces/Writing Sampler - Kierkegaard, Søren
Vergriffenes Buch, derzeit bei uns nicht verfügbar.
(*)
Kierkegaard, Søren:
Prefaces/Writing Sampler - gebunden oder broschiert

1998, ISBN: 9780691048277

ID: 600681058

Princeton. 1998. Princeton University Press. 1st American Edition. Very Good In Dustjacket. Translated from the Danish, Edited, and With An Introduction & Notes by Todd W. Nichol. 211 pages. March 1998. hardcover. Cover design by Frank Mahood. 0691048274. keywords: Literature Denmark Scandinavia Philosophy Religion Translated. inventory # 35103. FROM THE PUBLISHER - Prefaces was the last of four books by Søren Kierkegaard to appear within a space of two weeks in June 1844. Three Upbuilding Discourses and Philosophical Fragments were published first, followed by The Concept of Anxiety. This last volume, altlhough it had the usual complement of an upbuilding work, also had a companion of a different kind, the comically ironic Prefaces, published on the same day. Presented as a set of prefaces without a book to follow, this work is a satire on literary life in nineteenth-century Copenhagen, a lampoon of Danish Hegelianism, and a prefiguring of Kierkegaard’s final collision with Danish Christendom. At the same time it tightly expresses themes characteristic of the entire authorship, including subjectivity and Christian devotion. Shortly after publishing Prefaces, Kierkegaard began to prepare Writing Sampler as a sequel. This next work considers the themes of Prefaces but in yet a more ironical and satirical vein. Writing Sampler remained among Kierkegaard’s unpublished writings during his lifetime and appears here for the first time as Kierkegaard originally envisioned it, in the company of Prefaces. Søren Aabye Kierkegaard (5 May 1813 – 11 November 1855) was a prolific 19th century Danish philosopher and theologian. Kierkegaard strongly criticized both the Hegelianism of his time, and what he saw as the empty formalities of the Danish church. Much of his work deals with religious problems such as faith in God, the institution of the Christian Church, Christian ethics and theology, and the emotions and feelings of individuals when faced with life choices. His early work was written under various pseudonyms who present their own distinctive viewpoints in a complex dialogue. Kierkegaard left the task of discovering the meaning of the works to the reader, because ‘the task must be made difficult, for only the difficult inspires the noble-hearted’. Subsequently, many have interpreted Kierkegaard as an existentialist, neo-orthodoxist, postmodernist, humanist, individualist, etc. Crossing the boundaries of philosophy, theology, psychology, and literature, Kierkegaard came to be regarded as a highly significant and influential figure in contemporary thought. Kierkegaard has been called a philosopher, a theologian, the Father of Existentialism, a literary critic, a humorist, a psychologist, and a poet. Two of his popular ideas are ‘subjectivity’, and the ‘leap to faith,’ popularly referred to as the ‘leap of faith.’ The leap of faith is his conception of how an individual would believe in God, or how a person would act in love. It is not a rational decision, as it is transcending rationality in favour of something more uncanny, that is, faith. As such he thought that to have faith is at the same time to have doubt. So, for example, for one to truly have faith in God, one would also have to doubt that God exists; the doubt is the rational part of a person’s thought, without which the faith would have no real substance. Doubt is an essential element of faith, an underpinning. In plain words, to believe or have faith that God exists, without ever having doubted God’s existence or goodness, would not be a faith worth having. For example, it takes no faith to believe that a pencil or a table exists, when one is looking at it and touching it. In the same way, to believe or have faith in God is to know that one has no perceptual or any other access to God, and yet still has faith in God. Kierkegaard also stressed the importance of the self, and the self’s relation to the world as being grounded in self-reflection and introspection. He argued in Concluding Unscientific Postscript to Philosophical Fragments that ‘subjectivity is truth’ and ‘truth is subjectivity.’ This has to do with a distinction between what is objectively true and an individual’s subjective relation (such as indifference or commitment) to that truth. People who in some sense believe the same things may relate to those beliefs quite differently. Two individuals may both believe that many of those around them are poor and deserve help, but this knowledge may lead only one of them to decide to actually help the poor. Kierkegaard primarily discusses subjectivity with regard to religious matters, however. As already noted, he argues that doubt is an element of faith and that it is impossible to gain any objective certainty about religious doctrines such as the existence of God or the life of Christ. The most one could hope for would be the conclusion that it is probable that the Christian doctrines are true, but if a person were to believe such doctrines only to the degree they seemed likely to be true, he or she would not be genuinely religious at all. Faith consists in a subjective relation of absolute commitment to these doctrines. Either/Or, one of Kierkegaard’s works, was authored under the pseudonyms ‘A’ and ‘B,’ or Judge William, and edited under the pseudonym Victor Eremita. Half of Kierkegaard’s authorship was written behind the mask of several pseudonymous characters he created to represent different ways of thinking. This was part of Kierkegaard’s indirect communication. According to several passages in his works and journals, such as The Point of View of My Work as an Author, Kierkegaard wrote this way in order to prevent his works from being treated as a philosophical system with a systematic structure. In the Point of View, Kierkegaard wrote: ‘In the pseudonymous works, there is not a single word which is mine. I have no opinion about these works except as a third person, no knowledge of their meaning, except as a reader, not the remotest private relation to them.’ Kierkegaard used indirect communication to make it difficult to ascertain whether he actually held any of the views presented in his works. He hoped readers would simply read the work at face value without attributing it to some aspect of his life. Kierkegaard also did not want his readers to treat his work as an authoritative system, but rather look to themselves for interpretation. Early Kierkegaardian scholars, such as Theodor W. Adorno, have disregarded Kierkegaard’s intentions and argue the entire authorship should be treated as Kierkegaard’s own personal and religious views. This view leads to many confusions and contradictions which make Kierkegaard appear incoherent. However, many later scholars such as the post-structuralists, have respected Kierkegaard’s intentions and interpreted his work by attributing the pseudonymous texts to their respective authors. Kierkegaard’s final years were taken up with a sustained, outright attack on the Danish People’s Church by means of newspaper articles published in The Fatherland (F'drelandet) and a series of self-published pamphlets called The Moment (Øjeblikket) Kierkegaard was initially called to action after Professor Hans Lassen Martensen gave a speech in church in which he called his recently deceased predecessor Bishop Jakob P. Mynster a ‘truth-witness, one of the authentic truth-witnesses.’ Kierkegaard had an affection towards Mynster, but had come to see that his conception of Christianity was in man’s interest, rather than God’s, and in no way was Mynster’s life comparable to that of a ‘truth-witness.’ Before the tenth chapter of The Moment could be published, Kierkegaard collapsed on the street and was eventually taken to a hospital. He stayed in the hospital for over a month and refused to receive communion from a pastor, whom Kierkegaard regarded as merely an official and not a servant of God. He said to Emil Boesen, a friend since childhood who kept a record of his conversations with Kierkegaard and was himself a pastor, that his life had been one of great and unknown suffering, which looked like vanity to others but was not. Kierkegaard died in Frederik’s Hospital after being there for over a month, possibly from complications from a fall he had taken from a tree when he was a boy. He was interred in the Assistens Kirkegård in the Nørrebro section of Copenhagen. At Kierkegaard’s funeral, his nephew Henrik Lund caused a disturbance by protesting that Kierkegaard was being buried by the official church even though in his life he had broken from and denounced it. Lund was later fined. ISBN: 0691048274.

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Kierkegaard's Writings, IX: Prefaces: Writing Sampler: Light Reading for Certain Classes as the Occasion May Require: Prefaces, Writing Sampler v. 9
Autor:

Soren Kierkegaard, Todd Nichols, Todd W. Nichol

Titel:

Kierkegaard's Writings, IX: Prefaces: Writing Sampler: Light Reading for Certain Classes as the Occasion May Require: Prefaces, Writing Sampler v. 9

ISBN-Nummer:

9780691048277

"Prefaces" was the last of four books by S ren Kierkegaard to appear within two weeks in June 1844. "Three Upbuilding Discourses" and "Philosophical Fragments" were published first, followed by "The Concept of Anxiety" and its companion--published on the same day--the comically ironic "Prefaces." Presented as a set of prefaces without a book to follow, this work is a satire on literary life in nineteenth-century Copenhagen, a lampoon of Danish Hegelianism, and a prefiguring of Kierkegaard's final collision with Danish Christendom. Shortly after publishing "Prefaces," Kierkegaard began to prepare "Writing Sampler" as a sequel. "Writing Sampler" considers the same themes taken up in "Prefaces" but in yet a more ironical and satirical vein. Although "Writing Sampler" remained unpublished during his lifetime, it is presented here as Kierkegaard originally envisioned it, in the company of "Prefaces."

Detailangaben zum Buch - Kierkegaard's Writings, IX: Prefaces: Writing Sampler: Light Reading for Certain Classes as the Occasion May Require: Prefaces, Writing Sampler v. 9


EAN (ISBN-13): 9780691048277
ISBN (ISBN-10): 0691048274
Gebundene Ausgabe
Erscheinungsjahr: 1998
Herausgeber: PRINCETON UNIV PR
232 Seiten
Gewicht: 0,435 kg
Sprache: eng/Englisch

Buch in der Datenbank seit 24.10.2007 10:02:09
Buch zuletzt gefunden am 26.10.2016 10:13:09
ISBN/EAN: 9780691048277

ISBN - alternative Schreibweisen:
0-691-04827-4, 978-0-691-04827-7

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