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Simpatico: A Play in Three Acts - Shepard, Sam
Vergriffenes Buch, derzeit bei uns nicht verfügbar.
(*)
Shepard, Sam:

Simpatico: A Play in Three Acts - gebunden oder broschiert

1996, ISBN: 9780679763178

ID: 205413519

NY: Vintage Books, 1996. By VINCENT CANBY Published: November 20, 1994, Sunday IN THE FIRST ACT OF SAM Shepard's fine, seriously funny new play, "Simpatico," two old friends meet for the first time in years in a cheap apartment in Cucamonga, Calif. The place is so small and barren that it makes the average hot-bed motel room look like a suite at the Ritz. Vinnie (Fred Ward) lies on the filthy, cotlike bed, apparently in the last stages of physical and mental dissolution. He's unshaven, his hair matted. The expensively dressed, immaculately groomed Carter (Ed Harris) walks around a heap of dirty laundry with care, as if he didn't want to soil the soles of his shoes. They talk edgily about the old days before they went their separate ways, Vinnie into hiding under a succession of assumed names in backwater towns, Carter to fortune, power and respectability raising thoroughbred race horses in Lexington, Ky. The slobbish Vinnie baits Carter as much with what his ex-wife describes as the "apologetic menace" in his voice as by what he says. To tell the truth, Vinnie sneers, he always thought that Carter would run for Congress: "You had that aura about you. A kind of a, uh -- yuppie Protestant aura that's become so popular these days." Carter not only has the aura, but he also has the curse. Like so many Shepard characters from "Buried Child" (1979) and "True West" (1980) to "Fool for Love" (1982) and "A Lie of the Mind" (1985), Carter exists in what Mr. Shepard seems to see as an especially Protestant American limbo. He's a last, bewildered son of those once vital, hard-working, often lawless and repressed God-fearing folk, the restless pioneers who moved from east to west to open this land. Now at the end of their cycle, with no plains or mountain ranges to cross, the sons of those pioneers are disconnected from any sense of purpose and community. They hustle and scheme without moral compass, trying to survive by making accommodations that are at best temporary, more often delusional. This is by no means an exclusively Protestant curse but, in Mr. Shepard's plays, it helps explain a society in which unbridled self-interest has come to be acclaimed behavior and in which whim is regarded as thought. America is not an old country, but all of the characters in "Simpatico" are decadent before their time. With two exceptions, they're also completely without honor. Under the expert direction of the playwright, Carter, Vinnie and the others are the most compulsively watchable, most entertaining collection of rascals, scalawags and fools to be seen on any New York stage in a long time. "Simpatico," which is now at the Newman in the Joseph Papp Public Theater, is Mr. Shepard writing at his distinctive, savage best. The play is more densely plotted than is usually true of a Shepard work, being the finale of a scam that appears to have begun 15 years before the opening confrontation in Cucamonga. Carter and Vinnie, pals since the sixth grade and brothers in every way except blood ties, had defrauded California's thoroughbred racing community by switching two look-alike horses to make some fast money. They later scotched an investigation into their activities by successfully framing the racing commissioner who had discovered their deception. When Vinnie left town, he went into hiding. When Carter left town, he left driving Vinnie's 1958 Buick, taking with him Vinnie's wife, Rosie. That was then. Now, when "Simpatico" begins, the once passive Vinnie has become restive living on the largess of his increasingly successful friend. He doesn't miss Rosie. She wasn't to be trusted anyway. He's even sardonically amused by Carter's own marital troubles with her. Vinnie also has a new girlfriend, which is the stated reason he has called Carter from Lexington to his Cucamonga hideaway. The real reason is blackmail, but he doesn't want money. Unless Carter turns himself in, he says he will make public some incriminating letters and photographs that will reopen the California investigation, in this way to bring them both down. The question: Is the addled Vinnie seeking revenge or simply his own peace of mind? For that matter, why has Carter tolerated the threat represented by Vinnie all this time? The play covers two days, twice shifting from California to Kentucky and back again, as Mr. Shepard explores favorite themes relating to guilt, greed, mendacity and his own take on brotherhood. In Mr. Shepard's work, this includes the incestuous relationship between brother and sister in "Fool for Love," as well as Carter and Vinnie's symbiotic relationship, which remains fixed throughout the play even as their roles begin to change. I've no idea how Mr. Shepard writes, but he would seem to be someone who starts off not knowing exactly where he's going to land, or how. This would explain why, after most of the play's three acts and seven scenes, "Simpatico" ends on a note that seems more theoretically correct than emotionally fulfilling. It's as if he had simply run down, as if his hand had become tired after writing so fast in such a heat. Or the fault could be the staging, or maybe the audience suddenly leaps ahead of the story for the first time. Yet, until its closing moments, "Simpatico" is a breathtaking succession of surprises in the writing and in the performances. With the exception of David Mamet, no American playwright of his generation matches Mr. Shepard in the creation of characters that are immediately so accessible and so mysterious. In "Simpatico" there is Cecilia (Marcia Gay Harden), an enchanting waif whom Vinnie has met in the Cucamonga Safeway, a young woman whose rich fantasy life doesn't prevent her from being one of the few people in the play who has her feet on the ground. ROSIE (BEVERLY D'ANgelo) doesn't appear until the third act but, because she has been talked about at length during Acts I and II, she's a major figure long before she enters. When she does come on, announcing that she can't take any excitement ("My pills haven't kicked in"), she's even tougher and more dangerously funny than her reputation. The play's benign conscience is Simms, played with laid-back finesse by James Gammon. He's the aging, former racing commissioner who, enthusiastically if unknowingly, cooperated in the sex scandal that ended his career. Now living under an alias, he is a dedicated specialist in thoroughbred blood lines. It's to him that Mr. Shepard gives some of the play's best lines about the condition of horses and humans, even as Simms is speculating on how to deal with the gorgeous and possibly not-so-innocent Cecilia, sent to him by Carter to strike an unsavory deal. As the boozy Vinnie, Mr. Ward is extraordinary to watch as he negotiates the stage, walking as if wearing snowshoes atop deep snow covered by only a thin crust of ice. He's not quite ready to give up and die. He also is the equal of Mr. Harris's far saner Carter. Mr. Harris, all compact energy and calculating mind, commands the play from vigorous beginning to desperate end. Mr. Shepard's physical production, designed by Loy Arcenas with lighting by Anne Militello, beautifully supplements his script. "Simpatico" (superb title) is seen within sets that, as the performance progresses, become more and more minimal, the playing areas ever smaller and more isolated in a black void, until darkness itself triumphs. "Simpatico" is a major addition to this theatrical season. . Not Indicated. Hard Cover. Near Fine/Very Good., Vintage Books, 1996

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Michael Diesman
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Simpatico: A Play in Three Acts - Shepard, Sam
Vergriffenes Buch, derzeit bei uns nicht verfügbar.
(*)

Shepard, Sam:

Simpatico: A Play in Three Acts - gebunden oder broschiert

1996, ISBN: 0679763171

ID: 1212444427

[EAN: 9780679763178], [PU: Vintage Books, NY], AMERICAN DRAMA DRAMATIC WORKS AUTHOR, Jacket, By VINCENT CANBY Published: November 20, 1994, Sunday IN THE FIRST ACT OF SAM Shepard's fine, seriously funny new play, "Simpatico," two old friends meet for the first time in years in a cheap apartment in Cucamonga, Calif. The place is so small and barren that it makes the average hot-bed motel room look like a suite at the Ritz. Vinnie (Fred Ward) lies on the filthy, cotlike bed, apparently in the last stages of physical and mental dissolution. He's unshaven, his hair matted. The expensively dressed, immaculately groomed Carter (Ed Harris) walks around a heap of dirty laundry with care, as if he didn't want to soil the soles of his shoes. They talk edgily about the old days before they went their separate ways, Vinnie into hiding under a succession of assumed names in backwater towns, Carter to fortune, power and respectability raising thoroughbred race horses in Lexington, Ky. The slobbish Vinnie baits Carter as much with what his ex-wife describes as the "apologetic menace" in his voice as by what he says. To tell the truth, Vinnie sneers, he always thought that Carter would run for Congress: "You had that aura about you. A kind of a, uh -- yuppie Protestant aura that's become so popular these days." Carter not only has the aura, but he also has the curse. Like so many Shepard characters from "Buried Child" (1979) and "True West" (1980) to "Fool for Love" (1982) and "A Lie of the Mind" (1985), Carter exists in what Mr. Shepard seems to see as an especially Protestant American limbo. He's a last, bewildered son of those once vital, hard-working, often lawless and repressed God-fearing folk, the restless pioneers who moved from east to west to open this land. Now at the end of their cycle, with no plains or mountain ranges to cross, the sons of those pioneers are disconnected from any sense of purpose and community. They hustle and scheme without moral compass, trying to survive by making accommodations that are at best temporary, more often delusional. This is by no means an exclusively Protestant curse but, in Mr. Shepard's plays, it helps explain a society in which unbridled self-interest has come to be acclaimed behavior and in which whim is regarded as thought. America is not an old country, but all of the characters in "Simpatico" are decadent before their time. With two exceptions, they're also completely without honor. Under the expert direction of the playwright, Carter, Vinnie and the others are the most compulsively watchable, most entertaining collection of rascals, scalawags and fools to be seen on any New York stage in a long time. "Simpatico," which is now at the Newman in the Joseph Papp Public Theater, is Mr. Shepard writing at his distinctive, savage best. The play is more densely plotted than is usually true of a Shepard work, being the finale of a scam that appears to have begun 15 years before the opening confrontation in Cucamonga. Carter and Vinnie, pals since the sixth grade and brothers in every way except blood ties, had defrauded California's thoroughbred racing community by switching two look-alike horses to make some fast money. They later scotched an investigation into their activities by successfully framing the racing commissioner who had discovered their deception. When Vinnie left town, he went into hiding. When Carter left town, he left driving Vinnie's 1958 Buick, taking with him Vinnie's wife, Rosie. That was then. Now, when "Simpatico" begins, the once passive Vinnie has become restive living on the largess of his increasingly successful friend. He doesn't miss Rosie. She wasn't to be trusted anyway. He's even sardonically amused by Carter's own marital troubles with her. Vinnie also has a new girlfriend, which is the stated reason he has called Carter from Lexington to his Cucamonga hideaway. The real reason is blackmail, but he doesn't want money. Unless Carter turns himself in, he says he will make public some incriminating letters and photographs that will reopen the California inves

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michael diesman, flushing, NY, U.S.A. [3245845] [Rating: 4 (von 5)]
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(*) Derzeit vergriffen bedeutet, dass dieser Titel momentan auf keiner der angeschlossenen Plattform verfügbar ist.
Simpatico: A Play in Three Acts - Shepard, Sam
Vergriffenes Buch, derzeit bei uns nicht verfügbar.
(*)
Shepard, Sam:
Simpatico: A Play in Three Acts - gebunden oder broschiert

1996

ISBN: 0679763171

ID: 1212444427

[EAN: 9780679763178], [PU: Vintage Books, NY], AMERICAN DRAMA DRAMATIC WORKS AUTHOR, By VINCENT CANBY Published: November 20, 1994, Sunday IN THE FIRST ACT OF SAM Shepard's fine, seriously funny new play, "Simpatico," two old friends meet for the first time in years in a cheap apartment in Cucamonga, Calif. The place is so small and barren that it makes the average hot-bed motel room look like a suite at the Ritz. Vinnie (Fred Ward) lies on the filthy, cotlike bed, apparently in the last stages of physical and mental dissolution. He's unshaven, his hair matted. The expensively dressed, immaculately groomed Carter (Ed Harris) walks around a heap of dirty laundry with care, as if he didn't want to soil the soles of his shoes. They talk edgily about the old days before they went their separate ways, Vinnie into hiding under a succession of assumed names in backwater towns, Carter to fortune, power and respectability raising thoroughbred race horses in Lexington, Ky. The slobbish Vinnie baits Carter as much with what his ex-wife describes as the "apologetic menace" in his voice as by what he says. To tell the truth, Vinnie sneers, he always thought that Carter would run for Congress: "You had that aura about you. A kind of a, uh -- yuppie Protestant aura that's become so popular these days." Carter not only has the aura, but he also has the curse. Like so many Shepard characters from "Buried Child" (1979) and "True West" (1980) to "Fool for Love" (1982) and "A Lie of the Mind" (1985), Carter exists in what Mr. Shepard seems to see as an especially Protestant American limbo. He's a last, bewildered son of those once vital, hard-working, often lawless and repressed God-fearing folk, the restless pioneers who moved from east to west to open this land. Now at the end of their cycle, with no plains or mountain ranges to cross, the sons of those pioneers are disconnected from any sense of purpose and community. They hustle and scheme without moral compass, trying to survive by making accommodations that are at best temporary, more often delusional. This is by no means an exclusively Protestant curse but, in Mr. Shepard's plays, it helps explain a society in which unbridled self-interest has come to be acclaimed behavior and in which whim is regarded as thought. America is not an old country, but all of the characters in "Simpatico" are decadent before their time. With two exceptions, they're also completely without honor. Under the expert direction of the playwright, Carter, Vinnie and the others are the most compulsively watchable, most entertaining collection of rascals, scalawags and fools to be seen on any New York stage in a long time. "Simpatico," which is now at the Newman in the Joseph Papp Public Theater, is Mr. Shepard writing at his distinctive, savage best. The play is more densely plotted than is usually true of a Shepard work, being the finale of a scam that appears to have begun 15 years before the opening confrontation in Cucamonga. Carter and Vinnie, pals since the sixth grade and brothers in every way except blood ties, had defrauded California's thoroughbred racing community by switching two look-alike horses to make some fast money. They later scotched an investigation into their activities by successfully framing the racing commissioner who had discovered their deception. When Vinnie left town, he went into hiding. When Carter left town, he left driving Vinnie's 1958 Buick, taking with him Vinnie's wife, Rosie. That was then. Now, when "Simpatico" begins, the once passive Vinnie has become restive living on the largess of his increasingly successful friend. He doesn't miss Rosie. She wasn't to be trusted anyway. He's even sardonically amused by Carter's own marital troubles with her. Vinnie also has a new girlfriend, which is the stated reason he has called Carter from Lexington to his Cucamonga hideaway. The real reason is blackmail, but he doesn't want money. Unless Carter turns himself in, he says he will make public some incriminating letters and photographs that will reopen the California inves

gebrauchtes bzw. antiquarisches Buch Abebooks.de
michael diesman, flushing, NY, U.S.A. [3245845] [Rating: 5 (von 5)]
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Simpatico (Vintage)
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Simpatico (Vintage) - gebrauchtes Buch

ISBN: 9780679763178

ID: b6efaf0d0455324e3253a66ded6ab49d

Carter ought to be managing his thoroughbred business is Kentucky. Instead, he is in a desolate room in Cucamonga, Nowheresville, U.S.A., trying to get back in the good graces of Vinnie, the one man who has the power to destroy him. From the beginning, Sam Shepard's Simpatico launches us into the world of horse racing, where high society meets the low life and the line between winners and losers is as treacherously thin as a razor blade., [PU: Random House; Alfred A. Knopf]

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Simpatico : A Play in Three Acts - Sam Shepard
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Excellent Marketplace listings for "Simpatico : A Play in Three Acts" by Sam Shepard starting as low as $1.99! 9780679763178,0679763171,simpatico,play,three,acts,shepard Paperback, Penguin Random House Llc

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Simpatico
Autor:

Shepard, Sam

Titel:

Simpatico

ISBN-Nummer:

9780679763178

Carter ought to be managing his thoroughbred business is Kentucky. Instead, he is in a desolate room in Cucamonga, Nowheresville, U.S.A., trying to get back in the good graces of Vinnie, the one man who has the power to destroy him. From the beginning, Sam Shepard's Simpatico launches us into the world of horse racing, where high society meets the low life and the line between winners and losers is as treacherously thin as a razor blade.

Detailangaben zum Buch - Simpatico


EAN (ISBN-13): 9780679763178
ISBN (ISBN-10): 0679763171
Gebundene Ausgabe
Taschenbuch
Erscheinungsjahr: 1996
Herausgeber: VINTAGE BOOKS
144 Seiten
Gewicht: 0,172 kg
Sprache: eng/Englisch

Buch in der Datenbank seit 27.04.2007 14:12:01
Buch zuletzt gefunden am 22.10.2016 07:46:02
ISBN/EAN: 9780679763178

ISBN - alternative Schreibweisen:
0-679-76317-1, 978-0-679-76317-8

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