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The Beginnings of San Francisco: From the Expedition of Anza, 1774, to the City Charter of April 15, 1850 - Zoeth Skinner Eldredge
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Zoeth Skinner Eldredge:

The Beginnings of San Francisco: From the Expedition of Anza, 1774, to the City Charter of April 15, 1850 - Taschenbuch

ISBN: 9781443708487

ID: 596864861

RareBooksClub. Paperback. New. This item is printed on demand. Paperback. 162 pages. Dimensions: 9.7in. x 7.4in. x 0.3in.This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1905 Excerpt: . . . critic and to have been somewhat a showman himself and had other things in hand. An advertisement of Sept 1770 tells that the healthy and cheerful situation of the Bagatelle at Widcombe in the road of Prior Parkf has induced Mr. Bowers to have public breakfasts. At the same spot visitors may amuse themselves by seeing seals cut by the Wicksteed water machine. Wilkes, Sheridan and Fox, by W. F. Rae, p. 156. t Journal, p 4, col 1. Coffee, tea, dinners, the best wines. Another advertisement tells that there, in, --The air serene, tabours play, We breakfast, dance, and dine, And, with innocence, crown the day, Midst flasks of noble wine. t But success does not seem to have come as on 6th May 1773 was offered for sale in the parish of Widcombe and Lyncombe a valuable spring of mineral water and the Wicksteed machine and Bagatelle and c as let to Messrs. Wicksteed and Bowers. ! It may be just further noted that Mr. Bowers box keeper at Drury Lane theatre took his benefit 11 May 1767. As there are no existing parochial records for the time that Sheridan resided at Bath those of the nearest date available may be examined for any further possible clue. Looking up the earliest rate books, in 1775 Mr. William Bowers paid poor rate for his house m Kingsmead St eight shillings and nine pence; and for his garden in Kingsmead St six pence, and for his garden in James St one shilling and six pence; and in the same year he paid a water rent in New King St. Houses were not usually numbered at this time. Thus there was advertised for sale a house described as, --situated in the parish of Lyncomb and Widcomb next the centre house in the row called Claverton street on the left hand beyond Gibbss mill leading to Claverton Down. Some others may be noted, as--To. . . This item ships from La Vergne,TN., RareBooksClub, Curzon Press. Paperback. New. Paperback. 480 pages. Dimensions: 8.4in. x 5.5in. x 1.3in.The Beginnings Of San Francisco : From The Expedition Of Anza, 1774, To The City Charter Of April 15, 1850, By ZOETH S. ELDREDGE. 1912. VOLUME II. CONTAINS Chapters XIII. to XVII. Notes 33 to 40 Appendix Index CHAPTER XIII. THE COMING OF THE ARGONAWS 1849-1 850 YEARS before the discovery of goId on the American river gold placers had been worked in California with varying degrees of success. But little attention was paid to rhis industry and it was not considered of much importance by either the Californians or the foreigners residing in their midst. The priests discouraged mining, the rancheros were indifferent to it, and neither class wished to see the country filled with a mining population. On March 2, x844. , the deputy for California to the Mexican congress, Don Manuel Castaiares, reported to his government the discovery of gold in the vicinity of Los AngeIes the previous year. These mines had produced from about the middle of the year to December 1843 two thousand ounces, the most of which had been sent m the United States. He said the placers extended a distance of nearly thirty Ieagues seventy-eight miles. William H. Thornes, writing from San Pedro where the ship Admittance was raking cargo June 30, 1843, says Here we also received ten iron flasks of gold dust, although where the latter came from no one knew, but it was reported that the merchants of the Pueblo 10s AngeIes traded for it with the Indians and the latter would not reveal the source whence it came. t When Alfred Robinson went to the United States Castaiiares CoItccion dc Documcntos. t Thomes On Land and Sea, p. 253. 443 in 1843, he carried to the mint in Philadelphia a package of gold dust from Abel Stearns of Los Angeles, the assay of which showed it to be -906 fine. The placers from which this gold came were on the San Francisco rancho, near the mission of San Fernando. The rancho had formerly belonged to the mission, but at this time was in possession of the Del Valle family. The discovery was made in March 1842 and in the following May, Ignacio Del Valle was appointed encargo de justicias to preserve order in the mining district. William H. Davis says that from eighty to one hundred thousand dollars of gold was taken from these places in two years. Colonel Mason in his report of August 17, 1848, on the gold fields of California says The gold placer near the mission of San Fernando has long been known but has been but little wrought for want of water. But the event that was to set the world abIaze and create an empire on the shores of the Pacific was the discovery by James 147. Marshall of gold on the American river January 24, 1848. It may seem strange that in a community where the some- what extensive placers of the San Fernando valley received so little attention a discovery of gold pIacers in the Sacrament0 valley should have created such intense excitement. It may be that the reason for this was that the discovery on the American river was so quickJy followed by reports of the great ex- tent of the gold region and the astonishing richness of the placers. The gold deposits were on or near the surface, no capital was required to work them, and a Iaboring man with nothing but his pick, shovel, and pan could obtain from one to two or more ounces per day, with the possibility, always, of acquiring a fortune in a few weeks. In the foothills of the sierras about forty-five miles northeast of the Embarcadero of the Sacra- mento, on the south fork of the American river, Captain Sutter was building a sawmill in the fall and winter of 1847, and employed James W. Marshall to superintend the work. In digging a tail race for the mill, Marshal1 was in the habit of turning the water into the ditch at night to wash out the dirt loosened by the workmen during the day. . . This item ships from multiple locations. Your book may arrive from Roseburg,OR, La Vergne,TN., Curzon Press

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The Beginnings Of San Francisco: From The Expedition Of Anza, 1774, To The City Charter Of April 15, 1850 (Paperback) - Zoeth Skinner Eldredge
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Zoeth Skinner Eldredge:

The Beginnings Of San Francisco: From The Expedition Of Anza, 1774, To The City Charter Of April 15, 1850 (Paperback) - Taschenbuch

2008, ISBN: 1443708488

ID: 2691450333

[EAN: 9781443708487], Neubuch, [PU: Read Books, United Kingdom], Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****.The Beginnings Of San Francisco: From The Expedition Of Anza, 1774, To The City Charter Of April 15, 1850, By ZOETH S. ELDREDGE. 1912. VOLUME II. CONTAINS Chapters XIII. to XVII. Notes 33 to 40 Appendix Index CHAPTER XIII. THE COMING OF THE ARGONAWS 1849-1 850 YEARS before the discovery of goId on the American river gold placers had been worked in California with varying degrees of success. But little attention was paid to rhis industry and it was not considered of much importance by either the Californians or the foreigners residing in their midst. The priests discouraged mining, the rancheros were indifferent to it, and neither class wished to see the country filled with a mining population. On March 2, x844., the deputy for California to the Mexican congress, Don Manuel Castaiares, reported to his government the discovery of gold in the vicinity of Los AngeIes the previous year. These mines had produced from about the middle of the year to December 1843 two thousand ounces, the most of which had been sent m the United States. He said the placers extended a distance of nearly thirty Ieagues seventy-eight miles. William H. Thornes, writing from San Pedro where the ship Admittance was raking cargo June 30, 1843, says Here we also received ten iron flasks of gold dust, although where the latter came from no one knew, but it was reported that the merchants of the Pueblo 10s AngeIes traded for it with the Indians and the latter would not reveal the source whence it came.t When Alfred Robinson went to the United States Castaiiares CoItccion dc Documcntos. t Thomes On Land and Sea, p. 253. 443 in 1843, he carried to the mint in Philadelphia a package of gold dust from Abel Stearns of Los Angeles, the assay of which showed it to be -906 fine. The placers from which this gold came were on the San Francisco rancho, near the mission of San Fernando. The rancho had formerly belonged to the mission, but at this time was in possession of the Del Valle family. The discovery was made in March 1842 and in the following May, Ignacio Del Valle was appointed encargo de justicias to preserve order in the mining district. William H. Davis says that from eighty to one hundred thousand dollars of gold was taken from these places in two years. Colonel Mason in his report of August 17, 1848, on the gold fields of California says The gold placer near the mission of San Fernando has long been known but has been but little wrought for want of water. But the event that was to set the world abIaze and create an empire on the shores of the Pacific was the discovery by James 147. Marshall of gold on the American river January 24, 1848. It may seem strange that in a community where the some- what extensive placers of the San Fernando valley received so little attention a discovery of gold pIacers in the Sacrament0 valley should have created such intense excitement. It may be that the reason for this was that the discovery on the American river was so quickJy followed by reports of the great ex- tent of the gold region and the astonishing richness of the placers. The gold deposits were on or near the surface, no capital was required to work them, and a Iaboring man with nothing but his pick, shovel, and pan could obtain from one to two or more ounces per day, with the possibility, always, of acquiring a fortune in a few weeks. In the foothills of the sierras about forty-five miles northeast of the Embarcadero of the Sacra- mento, on the south fork of the American river, Captain Sutter was building a sawmill in the fall and winter of 1847, and employed James W. Marshall to superintend the work. In digging a tail race for the mill, Marshal1 was in the habit of turning the water into the ditch at night to wash out the dirt loosened by the workmen during the day.

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ISBN: 9781443708487

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The Beginnings Of San Francisco : From The Expedition Of Anza, 1774, To The City Charter Of April 15, 1850, By ZOETH S. ELDREDGE. 1912. VOLUME II. CONTAINS Chapters XIII. to XVII. Notes 33 to 40 Appendix Index CHAPTER XIII. THE COMING OF THE ARGONAWS 1849-1 850 YEARS before the discovery of goId on the American river gold placers had been worked in California with varying degrees of success. But little attention was paid to rhis industry and it was not considered of much importance by either the Californians or the foreigners residing in their midst. The priests discouraged mining, the rancheros were indifferent to it, and neither class wished to see the country filled with a mining population. On March 2, x844., the deputy for California to the Mexican congress, Don Manuel Castaiares, reported to his government the discovery of gold in the vicinity of Los AngeIes the previous year. These mines had produced from about the middle of the year to December 1843 two thousand ounces, the most of which had been sent m the United States. He said the placers extended a distance of nearly thirty Ieagues seventy-eight miles. William H. Thornes, writing from San Pedro where the ship Admittance was raking cargo June 30, 1843, says Here we also received ten iron flasks of gold dust, although where the latter came from no one knew, but it was reported that the merchants of the Pueblo 10s AngeIes traded for it with the Indians and the latter would not reveal the source whence it came.t When Alfred Robinson went to the United States Castaiiares CoItccion dc Documcntos. t Thomes On Land and Sea, p. 253. 443 in 1843, he carried to the mint in Philadelphia a package of gold dust from Abel Stearns of Los Angeles, the assay of which showed it to be -906 fine. The placers from which this gold came were on the San Francisco rancho, near the mission of San Fernando. The rancho had formerly belonged to the mission, but at this time was in possession of the Del Valle family. The discovery was made in March 1842 and in the following May, Ignacio Del Valle was appointed encargo de justicias to preserve order in the mining district. William H. Davis says that from eighty to one hundred thousand dollars of gold was taken from these places in two years. Colonel Mason in his report of August 17, 1848, on the gold fields of California says The gold placer near the mission of San Fernando has long been known but has been but little wrought for want of water. But the event that was to set the world abIaze and create an empire on the shores of the Pacific was the discovery by James 147. Marshall of gold on the American river January 24, 1848. It may seem strange that in a community where the some- what extensive placers of the San Fernando valley received so little attention a discovery of gold pIacers in the Sacrament0 valley should have created such intense excitement. It may be that the reason for this was that the discovery on the American river was so quickJy followed by reports of the great ex- tent of the gold region and the astonishing richness of the placers. The gold deposits were on or near the surface, no capital was required to work them, and a Iaboring man with nothing but his pick, shovel, and pan could obtain from one to two or more ounces per day, with the possibility, always, of acquiring a fortune in a few weeks. In the foothills of the sierras about forty-five miles northeast of the Embarcadero of the Sacra- mento, on the south fork of the American river, Captain Sutter was building a sawmill in the fall and winter of 1847, and employed James W. Marshall to superintend the work. In digging a tail race for the mill, Marshal1 was in the habit of turning the water into the ditch at night to wash out the dirt loosened by the workmen during the day... From The Expedition Of Anza, 1774, To The City Charter Of April 15, 1850 Bücher > Fremdsprachige Bücher > Englische Bücher Taschenbuch 25.08.2008, Curzon Press, .200

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The Beginnings Of San Francisco - Zoeth Skinner Eldredge
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ISBN: 9781443708487

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From The Expedition Of Anza, 1774, To The City Charter Of April 15, 1850 The Beginnings Of San Francisco : From The Expedition Of Anza, 1774, To The City Charter Of April 15, 1850, By ZOETH S. ELDREDGE. 1912. VOLUME II. CONTAINS Chapters XIII. to XVII. Notes 33 to 40 Appendix Index CHAPTER XIII. THE COMING OF THE ARGONAWS 1849-1 850 YEARS before the discovery of goId on the American river gold placers had been worked in California with varying degrees of success. But little attention was paid to rhis industry and it was not considered of much importance by either the Californians or the foreigners residing in their midst. The priests discouraged mining, the rancheros were indifferent to it, and neither class wished to see the country filled with a mining population. On March 2, x844., the deputy for California to the Mexican congress, Don Manuel Castaiares, reported to his government the discovery of gold in the vicinity of Los AngeIes the previous year. These mines had produced from about the middle of the year to December 1843 two thousand ounces, the most of which had been sent m the United States. He said the placers extended a distance of nearly thirty Ieagues seventy-eight miles. William H. Thornes, writing from San Pedro where the ship Admittance was raking cargo June 30, 1843, says Here we also received ten iron flasks of gold dust, although where the latter came from no one knew, but it was reported that the merchants of the Pueblo 10s AngeIes traded for it with the Indians and the latter would not reveal the source whence it came.t When Alfred Robinson went to the United States Castaiiares CoItccion dc Documcntos. t Thomes On Land and Sea, p. 253. 443 in 1843, he carried to the mint in Philadelphia a package of gold dust from Abel Stearns of Los Angeles, the assay of which showed it to be -906 fine. The placers from which this gold came were on the San Francisco rancho, near the mission of San Fernando. The rancho had formerly belonged to the mission, but at this time was in possession of the Del Valle family. The discovery was made in March 1842 and in the following May, Ignacio Del Valle was appointed encargo de justicias to preserve order in the mining district. William H. Davis says that from eighty to one hundred thousand dollars of gold was taken from these places in two years. Colonel Mason in his report of August 17, 1848, on the gold fields of California says The gold placer near the mission of San Fernando has long been known but has been but little wrought for want of water. But the event that was to set the world abIaze and create an empire on the shores of the Pacific was the discovery by James 147. Marshall of gold on the American river January 24, 1848. It may seem strange that in a community where the some- what extensive placers of the San Fernando valley received so little attention a discovery of gold pIacers in the Sacrament0 valley should have created such intense excitement. It may be that the reason for this was that the discovery on the American river was so quickJy followed by reports of the great ex- tent of the gold region and the astonishing richness of the placers. The gold deposits were on or near the surface, no capital was required to work them, and a Iaboring man with nothing but his pick, shovel, and pan could obtain from one to two or more ounces per day, with the possibility, always, of acquiring a fortune in a few weeks. In the foothills of the sierras about forty-five miles northeast of the Embarcadero of the Sacra- mento, on the south fork of the American river, Captain Sutter was building a sawmill in the fall and winter of 1847, and employed James W. Marshall to superintend the work. In digging a tail race for the mill, Marshal1 was in the habit of turning the water into the ditch at night to wash out the dirt loosened by the workmen during the day... Bücher / Fremdsprachige Bücher / Englische Bücher 978-1-4437-0848-7, Curzon Press

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The Beginnings Of San Francisco : From The Expedition Of Anza, 1774, To The City Charter Of April 15, 1850, By ZOETH S. ELDREDGE. 1912. VOLUME II. CONTAINS Chapters XIII. to XVII. Notes 33 to 40 Appendix Index CHAPTER XIII. THE COMING OF THE ARGONAWS 1849-1 850 YEARS before the discovery of goId on the American river gold placers had been worked in California with varying degrees of success. But little attention was paid to rhis industry and it was not considered of much importance by either the Californians or the foreigners residing in their midst. The priests discouraged mining, the rancheros were indifferent to it, and neither class wished to see the country filled with a mining population. On March 2, x844., the deputy for California to the Mexican congress, Don Manuel Castaiares, reported to his government the discovery of gold in the vicinity of Los AngeIes the previous year. These mines had produced from about the middle of the year to December 1843 two thousand ounces, the most of which had been sent m the United States. He said the placers extended a distance of nearly thirty Ieagues seventy-eight miles. William H. Thornes, writing from San Pedro where the ship Admittance was raking cargo June 30, 1843, says Here we also received ten iron flasks of gold dust, although where the latter came from no one knew, but it was reported that the merchants of the Pueblo 10s AngeIes traded for it with the Indians and the latter would not reveal the source whence it came.t When Alfred Robinson went to the United States Castaiiares CoItccion dc Documcntos. t Thomes On Land and Sea, p. 253. 443 in 1843, he carried to the mint in Philadelphia a package of gold dust from Abel Stearns of Los Angeles, the assay of which showed it to be -906 fine. The placers from which this gold came were on the San Francisco rancho, near the mission of San Fernando. The rancho had formerly belonged to the mission, but at this time was in possession of the Del Valle family. The discovery was made in March 1842 and in the following May, Ignacio Del Valle was appointed encargo de justicias to preserve order in the mining district. William H. Davis says that from eighty to one hundred thousand dollars of gold was taken from these places in two years. Colonel Mason in his report of August 17, 1848, on the gold fields of California says The gold placer near the mission of San Fernando has long been known but has been but little wrought for want of water. But the event that was to set the world abIaze and create an empire on the shores of the Pacific was the discovery by James 147. Marshall of gold on the American river January 24, 1848. It may seem strange that in a community where the some- what extensive placers of the San Fernando valley received so little attention a discovery of gold pIacers in the Sacrament0 valley should have created such intense excitement. It may be that the reason for this was that the discovery on the American river was so quickJy followed by reports of the great ex- tent of the gold region and the astonishing richness of the placers. The gold deposits were on or near the surface, no capital was required to work them, and a Iaboring man with nothing but his pick, shovel, and pan could obtain from one to two or more ounces per day, with the possibility, always, of acquiring a fortune in a few weeks. In the foothills of the sierras about forty-five miles northeast of the Embarcadero of the Sacra- mento, on the south fork of the American river, Captain Sutter was building a sawmill in the fall and winter of 1847, and employed James W. Marshall to superintend the work. In digging a tail race for the mill, Marshal1 was in the habit of turning the water into the ditch at night to wash out the dirt loosened by the workmen during the day... From The Expedition Of Anza, 1774, To The City Charter Of April 15, 1850 Buch (fremdspr.) Bücher>Fremdsprachige Bücher>Englische Bücher, Curzon Press

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The Beginnings of San Francisco: From the Expedition of Anza, 1774, to the City Charter of April 15, 1850
Autor:

Eldredge, Zoeth Skinner

Titel:

The Beginnings of San Francisco: From the Expedition of Anza, 1774, to the City Charter of April 15, 1850

ISBN-Nummer:

1443708488

The Beginnings Of San Francisco: From The Expedition Of Anza, 1774, To The City Charter Of April 15, 1850, By ZOETH S. ELDREDGE. 1912. VOLUME II. CONTAINS Chapters XIII. to XVII. Notes 33 to 40 Appendix Index CHAPTER XIII. THE COMING OF THE ARGONAWS 1849-1 850 YEARS before the discovery of goId on the American river gold placers had been worked in California with varying degrees of success. But little attention was paid to rhis industry and it was not considered of much importance by either the Californians or the foreigners residing in their midst. The priests discouraged mining, the rancheros were indifferent to it, and neither class wished to see the country filled with a mining population. On March 2, x844., the deputy for California to the Mexican congress, Don Manuel Castaiares, reported to his government the discovery of gold in the vicinity of Los AngeIes the previous year. These mines had produced from about the middle of the year to December 1843 two thousand ounces, the most of which had been sent m the United States. He said the placers extended a distance of nearly thirty Ieagues seventy-eight miles. William H. Thornes, writing from San Pedro where the ship Admittance was raking cargo June 30, 1843, says Here we also received ten iron flasks of gold dust, although where the latter came from no one knew, but it was reported that the merchants of the Pueblo 10s AngeIes traded for it with the Indians and the latter would not reveal the source whence it came.t When Alfred Robinson went to the United States Castaiiares CoItccion dc Documcntos. t Thomes On Land and Sea, p. 253. 443 in 1843, he carried to the mint in Philadelphia a package of gold dust from Abel Stearns of LosAngeles, the assay of which showed it to be -906 fine. The placers from which this gold came were on the San Francisco rancho, near the mission of San Fernando. The rancho had formerly belonged to the mission, but at this time was in possession of the Del Valle family. The discovery was made in March 1842 and in the following May, Ignacio Del Valle was appointed encargo de justicias to preserve order in the mining district. William H. Davis says that from eighty to one hundred thousand dollars of gold was taken from these places in two years. Colonel Mason in his report of August 17, 1848, on the gold fields of California says The gold placer near the mission of San Fernando has long been known but has been but little wrought for want of water. But the event that was to set the world abIaze and create an empire on the shores of the Pacific was the discovery by James 147. Marshall of gold on the American river January 24, 1848. It may seem strange that in a community where the some- what extensive placers of the San Fernando valley received so little attention a discovery of gold pIacers in the Sacrament0 valley should have created such intense excitement. It may be that the reason for this was that the discovery on the American river was so quickJy followed by reports of the great ex- tent of the gold region and the astonishing richness of the placers. The gold deposits were on or near the surface, no capital was required to work them, and a Iaboring man with nothing but his pick, shovel, and pan could obtain from one to two or more ounces per day, with the possibility, always, of acquiring a fortune in a few weeks. In the foothills of the sierras about forty-five miles northeast of theEmbarcadero of the Sacra- mento, on the south fork of the American river, Captain Sutter was building a sawmill in the fall and winter of 1847, and employed James W. Marshall to superintend the work. In digging a tail race for the mill, Marshal1 was in the habit of turning the water into the ditch at night to wash out the dirt loosened by the workmen during the day...

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EAN (ISBN-13): 9781443708487
ISBN (ISBN-10): 1443708488
Taschenbuch
Erscheinungsjahr: 2008
Herausgeber: CURZON PR
480 Seiten
Gewicht: 0,603 kg
Sprache: eng/Englisch

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ISBN/EAN: 1443708488

ISBN - alternative Schreibweisen:
1-4437-0848-8, 978-1-4437-0848-7

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