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We Would Have Played for Nothing: Baseball Stars of the 1950s and 1960s Talk About the Game They Loved - Vincent, Fay
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Vincent, Fay:

We Would Have Played for Nothing: Baseball Stars of the 1950s and 1960s Talk About the Game They Loved - signiertes Exemplar

2008, ISBN: 9781416553427

Gebundene Ausgabe, ID: 859211176

Belfast: The Blackstaff Press. Number 48 out of a limited edition of 500 copies / Excellent, close to new condition. Includes orignial, signed etching. . Belfast, The Blackstaff Press, 1984. 20.5 cm x 13 cm. IX, 96 pages. Original Hardcover in original slipcase. Number 48 out of a limited edition of 500 copies / Excellent, close to new condition. Includes orignial, signed etching. "The Night Before Larry Was Stretched" is an Irish execution ballad written in the Newgate cant. The song is in The Festival of Anacreon, with tune direction "To the hundreds of Drury I write." It is also listed in Colm Ó Lochlainn's Irish Street Ballads and Frank Harte's Songs of Dublin. Donagh MacDonagh gives the following sleeve note 'One of a group of Execution Songs written in Newgate Cant or Slang Style in the 1780s, others being The Kilmainham Minuet, Luke Caffrey's Ghost and Larry's Ghost in which, as promised in the seventh stanza of the present ballad, Larry comes "in a sheet to sweet Molly"!' The Newgate Cant or Slang Style is not unique to Dublin and all the cant and slang is to be found in Partridge's A Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English (1937). Nubbing cheat or Nubbin chit is cant for the gallows, while Darkmans is cant for night. Joyce, working out of Thomas Dekker's The Gul's Hornbook and The Belman of London (1608), wrote: White thy fambles, red thy gan And thy quarrons dainty is. Couch a hogshead with me then. In the Darkmans clip and kiss. The ballad is estimated to have been written around 1816. Will (Hurlfoot) Maher, a shoemaker from Waterford, wrote the song; Dr Robert Burrowes, the Dean of Saint Fin Barre's Cathedral in Cork, to whom it has been so often attributed, certainly did not. In Ballads from the Pubs of Ireland, p. 29, James N Healy attributes the song to a William Maher, (Hurlfoot Bill), but doesn't note when Maher lived. However, the song is attributed to a 'Curren' in The Universal Songster, 1828, this possibly being the witty barrister John Philpot Curran or JW Curren. The Newgate cant in which the song was written was a colloquial slang of 18th-century Dublin, similar to the thieves' cant still used in London (an example of the London use is seen in the 1998 film Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels). This is only one of a group of execution songs written in Newgate Cant or slang style somewhere around 1780, others being The Kilmainham Minuet, Luke Caffrey's Ghost and Larry's Ghost, which, as promised in the seventh verse, "comes in a sheet to sweet Molly". A French translation of the song called La mort de Socrate was written by Francis Sylvester Mahony, better known as "Father Prout" for Fraser's Magazine, and is also collected in Musa Pedestris, Three Centuries of Canting Songs and Slang Rhymes, collected and annotated by John S Farmer. (Wikipedia). The Illustrator: Hector McDonnell was born in West Belfast in March 1947. He studied at the Art Academy in Munich and later moved to Vienna where he spent a year working in a studio of the sculptor and architect Fritz Wotruba. Following the continental experience, about 1967 McDonnell entered Christ Church, Oxford College to study history. On graduating from Oxford, he began to exhibit his paintings regularly in London. Self-confessedly, Hector McDonnell is a loner, a maverick, an unbranded steer. As a completely figurative painter in the early 1970s he was out on a limb. The fashionable contemporary art at that time was abstract, pop or conceptual. His output is prolific. He produces a large quantity of oil paintings, both very large and very small, using dashing thick square brushstrokes, and presumably painted very quickly. His speciality is interiors, usually with a lot of floor in the foreground. These are often pub and cafe interiors, but more particularly shops, especially butchers, fishmongers and greengrocers. He also regularly produces small sets of etchings on the same subject. McDonnell allows himself to be seduced by what he sees: events startle him into perceiving what he calls the ‘magical’ in everyday situations. In his painting each object is imagined with the stout atmospheric density he needs to give form to his feelings. It might almost be possible to describe this as ‘folkloristic’, if by that one meant the creative fluency with language that turns the simplest Irishman into a poet – where the word is an integral part of man’s being poetry and naturalism lie side by side. McDonnell now spends much of the year in New York City, where he has a young family. (jameswray.ie)., The Blackstaff Press, Simon & Schuster, 2008. Signed by author on title page. Former Major League Baseball commissioner Fay Vincent brings together a stellar roster of ballplayers from the 1950s and 1960s in this wonderful new history of the game. These were the decades when baseball expanded across the country and truly became the national pastime. The era opened, though, with the domination of the New York teams: the Yankees, Dodgers, or Giants were in every World Series of the 1950s -- but by the end of the decade the two National League teams had moved to California. Representing those great teams in this volume are Whitey Ford, Ralph Branca, Carl Erskine, Duke Snider, and Bill Rigney. They recall the great 1951 Dodgers-Giants playoff that ended with Bobby Thomson's famous home run (served up by Branca). They remember the mighty Yankees, defeated at last in 1955 by the Dodgers, only to recover the World Series crown from their Brooklyn rivals a year later. They talk about their most feared opponents and most valued teammates, from Joe DiMaggio and Mickey Mantle to Jackie Robinson and Roy Campanella to Willie Mays. But there were great teams and great ballplayers elsewhere in the 1950s and 1960s. Hall of Fame pitcher Robin Roberts recalls the famous Whiz Kids Phillies of 1950 and his epic duels with Don Newcombe and other leading National League pitchers. Lew Burdette remembers his years as one-half of the dominating pitching duo (with Warren Spahn) that propelled the Braves to the World Series in 1957 and 1958. Harmon Killebrew recalls belting home runs for the hapless Washington Senators, then discovering a new world of enthusiastic fans in Minnesota when the Senators joined the westward migration and became the Twins. Brooks Robinson, on the other hand, played his entire twenty-three-year career for the Baltimore Orioles, never moving anywhere except all around third base, where he earned a record sixteen consecutive Gold Gloves. When Frank Robinson left Cincinnati to join Brooks on the Orioles in 1966, that team became a powerhouse. Frank Robinson won the MVP award that year, the first player to do so in each league. He remembers taking the momentous step to become the first African-American manager in the big leagues, the final step that Jackie Robinson had wanted to take. Like Frank Robinson, Billy Williams was one of the first African-American stars not to come out of the old Negro Leagues. He spent his greatest years with the Chicago Cubs, playing alongside Mr. Cub, Ernie Banks, and later Ron Santo, but here he recalls how he nearly gave up on the game in the minor leagues. We Would Have Played for Nothing is full of fascinating stories about how these great ballplayers broke into baseball, about the inevitable frustrations of trying to negotiate a contract with owners who always had the upper hand, and about great games and great stars-teammates and opponents-whose influence shaped these ballplayers' lives forever. Illustrated throughout, this book is a wonderful reminiscence of two great decades in the history of baseball. About the Author Fay Vincent is a former commissioner of Major League Baseball and the author of the previous volume in this baseball oral history series, The Only Game in Town. . Signed by Author. First Edition. Hard Cover. New/New., Simon & Schuster, 2008

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We Would Have Played for Nothing: Baseball Stars of the 1950s and 1960s Talk about the Game They Loved - Vincent, Fay
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Vincent, Fay:

We Would Have Played for Nothing: Baseball Stars of the 1950s and 1960s Talk about the Game They Loved - gebrauchtes Buch

ISBN: 9781416553427

ID: 6237105

Former Major League Baseball commissioner Fay Vincent brings together a stellar roster of ballplayers from the 1950s and 1960s in this wonderful new history of the game. These were the decades when baseball expanded across the country and truly became the national pastime. The era opened, though, with the domination of the New York teams: the Yankees, Dodgers, or Giants were in every World Series of the 1950s -- but by the end of the decade the two National League teams had moved to California. Representing those great teams in this volume are Whitey Ford, Ralph Branca, Carl Erskine, Duke Snider, and Bill Rigney. They recall the great 1951 Dodgers-Giants playoff that ended with Bobby Thomson's famous home run (served up by Branca). They remember the mighty Yankees, defeated at last in 1955 by the Dodgers, only to recover the World Series crown from their Brooklyn rivals a year later. They talk about their most feared opponents and most valued teammates, from Joe DiMaggio and Mickey Mantle to Jackie Robinson and Roy Campanella to Willie Mays. But there were great teams and great ballplayers elsewhere in the 1950s and 1960s. Hall of Fame pitcher Robin Roberts recalls the famous Whiz Kids Phillies of 1950 and his epic duels with Don Newcombe and other leading National League pitchers. Lew Burdette remembers his years as one-half of the dominating pitching duo (with Warren Spahn) that propelled the Braves to the World Series in 1957 and 1958. Harmon Killebrew recalls belting home runs for the hapless Washington Senators, then discovering a new world of enthusiastic fans in Minnesota when the Senators joined the westward migration and became the Twins. Brooks Robinson, on the other hand, played his entire twenty-three-year career for the Baltimore Orioles, never moving anywhere except all around third base, where he earned a record sixteen consecutive Gold Gloves. When Frank Robinson left Cincinnati to join Brooks on the Orioles in 1966, that team became a powerhouse. Frank Robinson won the MVP award that year, the first player to do so in each league. He remembers taking the momentous step to become the first African-American manager in the big leagues, the final step that Jackie Robinson had wanted to take. Like Frank Robinson, Billy Williams was one of the first African-American stars not to come out of the old Negro Leagues. He spent his greatest years with the Chicago Cubs, playing alongside Mr. Cub, Ernie Banks, and later Ron Santo, but here he recalls how he nearly gave up on the game in the minor leagues. "We Would Have Played for Nothing" is full of fascinating stories about how these great ballplayers broke into baseball, about the inevitable frustrations of trying to negotiate a contract with owners who always had the upper hand, and about great games and great stars-teammates and opponents-whose influence shaped these ballplayers' lives forever. Illustrated throughout, this book is a wonderful reminiscence of two gre We Would Have Played for Nothing: Baseball Stars of the 1950s and 1960s Talk about the Game They Loved Vincent, Fay, Simon & Schuster

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We Would Have Played for Nothing: Baseball Stars of the 1950s and 1960s Talk About the Game They Loved (Baseball Oral History Project) - Fay Vincent
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Fay Vincent:
We Would Have Played for Nothing: Baseball Stars of the 1950s and 1960s Talk About the Game They Loved (Baseball Oral History Project) - gebrauchtes Buch

ISBN: 1416553428

ID: 4923723

Former Major League Baseball commissioner Fay Vincent brings together a stellar roster of ballplayers from the 1950s and 1960s in this wonderful new history of the game. These were the decades when baseball expanded across the country and truly became the national pastime. The era opened, though, with the domination of the New York teams: the Yankees, Dodgers, or Giants were in every World Series of the 1950s -- but by the end of the decade the two National League teams had moved to California. Representing those great teams in this volume are Whitey Ford, Ralph Branca, Carl Erskine, Duke Snider, and Bill Rigney. They recall the great 1951 Dodgers-Giants playoff that ended with Bobby Thomson's famous home run (served up by Branca). They remember the mighty Yankees, defeated at last in 1955 by the Dodgers, only to recover the World Series crown from their Brooklyn rivals a year later. They talk about their most feared opponents and most valued teammates, from Joe DiMaggio and Mickey Mantle to Jackie Robinson and Roy Campanella to Willie Mays. But there were great teams and great ballplayers elsewhere in the 1950s and 1960s. Hall of Fame pitcher Robin Roberts recalls the famous Whiz Kids Phillies of 1950 and his epic duels with Don Newcombe and other leading National League pitchers. Lew Burdette remembers his years as one-half of the dominating pitching duo (with Warren Spahn) that propelled the Braves to the World Series in 1957 and 1958. Harmon 20th century,baseball,essays,history,miscellaneous,modern (16th-21st centuries),sports and outdoors Baseball, Simon & Schuster

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We Would Have Played for Nothing : Baseball Stars of the 1950s and 1960s Talk About the Game They Loved - Vincent, Fay
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Vincent, Fay:
We Would Have Played for Nothing : Baseball Stars of the 1950s and 1960s Talk About the Game They Loved - gebunden oder broschiert

2008, ISBN: 1416553428

ID: 7102249010

[EAN: 9781416553427], Gebraucht, sehr guter Zustand, [PU: Simon & Schuster, New York, NY, U.S.A], NONFICTION SPORTS SPORT TEAM PLAYER COACH COACHES COMPETE COMPETITION DRILL PRACTICE GAME RULES REGULATIONS INSTRUCTION HOW TO HOW-TO INFORMATION TEACHER GUIDE PRO NOVICE BEGINNER PROFESSIONAL IMPROVEMENT METHOD GAMES TEAMS PLAYERS UNDEFEATED BASEBALL, Sports & Recreation|Baseball|History, Sports & Recreation|General, Jacket, Brief summary of content available upon request by e-mail.

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We Would Have Played for Nothing: Baseball Stars of the 1950s and 1960s Talk About the Game They Loved (Baseball Oral History Project) - Vincent, Fay
Vergriffenes Buch, derzeit bei uns nicht verfügbar.
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Vincent, Fay:
We Would Have Played for Nothing: Baseball Stars of the 1950s and 1960s Talk About the Game They Loved (Baseball Oral History Project) - gebunden oder broschiert

2008, ISBN: 1416553428

ID: 14220062292

[EAN: 9781416553427], [PU: Simon & Schuster], Sports & Recreation|Baseball|History, Sports & Recreation|General, This Book is in Good Condition. Clean Copy With Light Amount of Wear. 100% Guaranteed. Summary: Contents Introduction Ralph Branca Bill Rigney Duke Snider Robin Roberts Carl Erskine Whitey Ford Lew Burdette Harmon Killebrew Brooks Robinson Frank Robinson Billy Williams Index

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We Would Have Played for Nothing: Baseball Stars of the 1950s and 1960s Talk about the Game They Loved
Autor:

Vincent, Fay

Titel:

We Would Have Played for Nothing: Baseball Stars of the 1950s and 1960s Talk about the Game They Loved

ISBN-Nummer:

1416553428

Detailangaben zum Buch - We Would Have Played for Nothing: Baseball Stars of the 1950s and 1960s Talk about the Game They Loved


EAN (ISBN-13): 9781416553427
ISBN (ISBN-10): 1416553428
Gebundene Ausgabe
Taschenbuch
Erscheinungsjahr: 2008
Herausgeber: SIMON & SCHUSTER
327 Seiten
Gewicht: 0,617 kg
Sprache: eng/Englisch

Buch in der Datenbank seit 01.02.2008 16:16:16
Buch zuletzt gefunden am 03.09.2016 18:46:49
ISBN/EAN: 1416553428

ISBN - alternative Schreibweisen:
1-4165-5342-8, 978-1-4165-5342-7

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