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University of Nebraska Studies in Language, Literature and Criticism - Various
Vergriffenes Buch, derzeit bei uns nicht verfügbar.
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Various:

University of Nebraska Studies in Language, Literature and Criticism - Taschenbuch

2007, ISBN: 1406774294, Lieferbar binnen 4-6 Wochen Versandkosten:Versandkostenfrei innerhalb der BRD

ID: 9781406774290

Internationaler Buchtitel. In englischer Sprache. Verlag: DODO PR, 468 Seiten, L=216mm, B=140mm, H=26mm, Gew.=590gr, [GR: 25700 - TB/Literaturwissenschaft], [SW: - Literature - Classics / Criticism], Kartoniert/Broschiert, Klappentext: THE NATURALISM OF CONDILLAC ZORA SCHAUPP LINCOLN, NEBRASKA 1926 PREFACE The nineteenth-century critics saw in the French philos opher Condillac a materialist and a sensationalist, and abhorring both, they shunned his work and handed on their prejudices. Present-day pragmatists and behavior ists, however, should be able to view him more sympa thetically. The following study of the philosophy of Con dillac is not an attempt to reinstate a system, nor does it aspire to assign a philosopher to a permanent place in the final scheme of things. It has been undertaken merely with a view to re-evaluating Condillacs philosophical contribu tions, and for the sake of pointing out certain healthy tendencies in his thought that have hitherto failed of recog nition-There is at present no translation of Condillacs works into English with the exception of short passages in many his tories of philosophy, nor is there any critical account of his system. The picture of a century is hardly complete without the story of its speculative thought, and that this holds true for eighteenth-century France should not be overlooked. I owe much to Professor Grace de Laguna, under whose direction this study of the Naturalism of Condillac has been written, and to Professor Theodore de Laguna. I am indebted to them for unfailing assistance and for sympathetic criticism and for the shaping of my present philosophical interests and attitudes. ZOEA SCHAUPP University of Nebraska. TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER I. INTRODUCTION 5 CHAPTER II. SENSATION THE SOURCE OP EXPERIENCE 24 CHAPTER III. THE FUNCTION AND ORIGIN OP LANGUAGE 59 CHAPTER IV. COMPARATIVE PSYCHOLOGY 84 CHAPTER V. ANALYSIS THE METHOD OF SCIENCE . 101 CONCLUSION 119INTRODUCTION When Descartes published his Meditations in 1641, he was obliged to answer some very pertinent objections urged against the principles he had there tried to establish. Among his adversaries was Hobbes and Descartes became thoroughly exasperated with the persistent questions of this matter-of fact Englishman whom he found it so difficult to meet on common terms. The objections detracted little from the success of the work to which they were appended. Cartesianism triumphed in France, and the followers of Hobbes were confined, for the most part, to his own country men. But the philosophical spirit in France during the next century followed almost imperceptibly the stages of develop ment marked in England by Hobbes, Locke, and Berkeley. It became increasingly empirical and naturalistic and when, in 1733, Voltaire called the attention of the French to English thought and institutions, the seeds of the new philosophy fell upon fertile soil. It was not in Hobbes, however, that Voltaire found a herald of the new philosophy, but in the more romantic person of Bacon, who was more of an empiricist, and less of a materialist than his successor. The father of experimental philosophy he calls him, and sees in him the pioneer of the great naturalistic reaction against rationalism. The Lord Bacon, he says, was not yet acquainted with Nature, but then he knew, and pointed out the several Paths that lead to it. He had despised in his younger Years the thing called Philosophy in the Universities and did all that lay in his Power to prevent those Societies of Men, instituted to improve human Reason, from depraving it by their Quiddities, their Horrors of the Vacuum, their substantial Forms, and all those impertinent Terms which not only ignorance had rendered venerable, but which had been made sacred, by their being ridiculously blended with religion. l Lettres philosophiques sur les Anglais, Lettrc XII. Quoted from the London edition, 1833. 6 STUDIES IN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE France was ready for a new philosophy but she could not appropriate a foreign system, even when it had such an enthusiastic interpreter as Voltaire... THE NATURALISM OF CONDILLAC ZORA SCHAUPP LINCOLN, NEBRASKA 1926 PREFACE The nineteenth-century critics saw in the French philos opher Condillac a materialist and a sensationalist, and abhorring both, they shunned his work and handed on their prejudices. Present-day pragmatists and behavior ists, however, should be able to view him more sympa thetically. The following study of the philosophy of Con dillac is not an attempt to reinstate a system, nor does it aspire to assign a philosopher to a permanent place in the final scheme of things. It has been undertaken merely with a view to re-evaluating Condillacs philosophical contribu tions, and for the sake of pointing out certain healthy tendencies in his thought that have hitherto failed of recog nition-There is at present no translation of Condillacs works into English with the exception of short passages in many his tories of philosophy, nor is there any critical account of his system. The picture of a century is hardly complete without the story of its speculative thought, and that this holds true for eighteenth-century France should not be overlooked. I owe much to Professor Grace de Laguna, under whose direction this study of the Naturalism of Condillac has been written, and to Professor Theodore de Laguna. I am indebted to them for unfailing assistance and for sympathetic criticism and for the shaping of my present philosophical interests and attitudes. ZOEA SCHAUPP University of Nebraska. TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER I. INTRODUCTION 5 CHAPTER II. SENSATION THE SOURCE OP EXPERIENCE 24 CHAPTER III. THE FUNCTION AND ORIGIN OP LANGUAGE 59 CHAPTER IV. COMPARATIVE PSYCHOLOGY 84 CHAPTER V. ANALYSIS THE METHOD OF SCIENCE . 101 CONCLUSION 119INTRODUCTION When Descartes published his Meditations in 1641, he was obliged to answer some very pertinent objections urged against the principles he had there tried to establish. Among his adversaries was Hobbes and Descartes became thoroughly exasperated with the persistent questions of this matter-of fact Englishman whom he found it so difficult to meet on common terms. The objections detracted little from the success of the work to which they were appended. Cartesianism triumphed in France, and the followers of Hobbes were confined, for the most part, to his own country men. But the philosophical spirit in France during the next century followed almost imperceptibly the stages of develop ment marked in England by Hobbes, Locke, and Berkeley. It became increasingly empirical and naturalistic and when, in 1733, Voltaire called the attention of the French to English thought and institutions, the seeds of the new philosophy fell upon fertile soil. It was not in Hobbes, however, that Voltaire found a herald of the new philosophy, but in the more romantic person of Bacon, who was more of an empiricist, and less of a materialist than his successor. The father of experimental philosophy he calls him, and sees in him the pioneer of the great naturalistic reaction against rationalism. The Lord Bacon, he says, was not yet acquainted with Nature, but then he knew, and pointed out the several Paths that lead to it. He had despised in his younger Years the thing called Philosophy in the Universities and did all that lay in his Power to prevent those Societies of Men, instituted to improve human Reason, from depraving it by their Quiddities, their Horrors of the Vacuum, their substantial Forms, and all those impertinent Terms which not only ignorance had rendered venerable, but which had been made sacred, by their being ridiculously blended with religion. l Lettres philosophiques sur les Anglais, Lettrc XII. Quoted from the London edition, 1833. 6 STUDIES IN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE France was ready for a new philosophy but she could not appropriate a foreign system, even when it had such an enthusiastic interpreter as Voltaire...

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University of Nebraska Studies in Language, Literature and Criticism
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Various

Titel:

University of Nebraska Studies in Language, Literature and Criticism

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1406774294

THE NATURALISM OF CONDILLAC ZORA SCHAUPP LINCOLN, NEBRASKA 1926 PREFACE The nineteenth-century critics saw in the French philos opher Condillac a materialist and a sensationalist, and abhorring both, they shunned his work and handed on their prejudices. Present-day pragmatists and behavior ists, however, should be able to view him more sympa thetically. The following study of the philosophy of Con dillac is not an attempt to reinstate a system, nor does it aspire to assign a philosopher to a permanent place in the final scheme of things. It has been undertaken merely with a view to re-evaluating Condillacs philosophical contribu tions, and for the sake of pointing out certain healthy tendencies in his thought that have hitherto failed of recog nition-There is at present no translation of Condillacs works into English with the exception of short passages in many his tories of philosophy, nor is there any critical account of his system. The picture of a century is hardly complete without the story of its speculative thought, and that this holds true for eighteenth-century France should not be overlooked. I owe much to Professor Grace de Laguna, under whose direction this study of the Naturalism of Condillac has been written, and to Professor Theodore de Laguna. I am indebted to them for unfailing assistance and for sympathetic criticism and for the shaping of my present philosophical interests and attitudes. ZOEA SCHAUPP University of Nebraska. TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER I. INTRODUCTION 5 CHAPTER II. SENSATION THE SOURCE OP EXPERIENCE 24 CHAPTER III. THE FUNCTION AND ORIGIN OP LANGUAGE 59 CHAPTER IV. COMPARATIVE PSYCHOLOGY 84 CHAPTER V. ANALYSIS THE METHOD OF SCIENCE . 101 CONCLUSION 119INTRODUCTION When Descartes published his Meditations in 1641, he was obliged to answer some very pertinent objections urged against the principles he had there tried to establish. Among his adversaries was Hobbes and Descartes became thoroughly exasperated with the persistent questions of this matter-of fact Englishman whom he found it so difficult to meet on common terms. The objections detracted little from the success of the work to which they were appended. Cartesianism triumphed in France, and the followers of Hobbes were confined, for the most part, to his own country men. But the philosophical spirit in France during the next century followed almost imperceptibly the stages of develop ment marked in England by Hobbes, Locke, and Berkeley. It became increasingly empirical and naturalistic and when, in 1733, Voltaire called the attention of the French to English thought and institutions, the seeds of the new philosophy fell upon fertile soil. It was not in Hobbes, however, that Voltaire found a herald of the new philosophy, but in the more romantic person of Bacon, who was more of an empiricist, and less of a materialist than his successor. The father of experimental philosophy he calls him, and sees in him the pioneer of the great naturalistic reaction against rationalism. The Lord Bacon, he says, was not yet acquainted with Nature, but then he knew, and pointed out the several Paths that lead to it. He had despised in his younger Years the thing called Philosophy in the Universities and did all that lay in his Power to prevent those Societies of Men, instituted to improve human Reason, from depraving it by their Quiddities, their Horrors of the Vacuum, their substantial Forms, and all those impertinent Terms which not only ignorance had rendered venerable, but which had been made sacred, by their being ridiculously blended with religion. l Lettres philosophiques sur les Anglais, Lettrc XII. Quoted from the London edition, 1833. 6 STUDIES IN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE France was ready for a new philosophy but she could not appropriate a foreign system, even when it had such an enthusiastic interpreter as Voltaire...

Detailangaben zum Buch - University of Nebraska Studies in Language, Literature and Criticism


EAN (ISBN-13): 9781406774290
ISBN (ISBN-10): 1406774294
Taschenbuch
Erscheinungsjahr: 2007
Herausgeber: DODO PR
468 Seiten
Gewicht: 0,590 kg
Sprache: eng/Englisch

Buch in der Datenbank seit 07.11.2007 11:32:58
Buch zuletzt gefunden am 30.04.2010 17:40:59
ISBN/EAN: 1406774294

ISBN - alternative Schreibweisen:
1-4067-7429-4, 978-1-4067-7429-0

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