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Black Tales for White Children - Stigand, C. H.
Vergriffenes Buch, derzeit bei uns nicht verfügbar.
(*)
Stigand, C. H.:

Black Tales for White Children - Taschenbuch

2007, ISBN: 1406723479, Lieferbar binnen 4-6 Wochen Versandkosten:Versandkostenfrei innerhalb der BRD

ID: 9781406723472

Internationaler Buchtitel. In englischer Sprache. Verlag: DODO PR, 212 Seiten, L=216mm, B=140mm, H=12mm, Gew.=272gr, [GR: 21110 - TB/Belletristik/Romane/Erzählungen], [SW: - Fiction - General], Kartoniert/Broschiert, Klappentext: FOREWORD MANY hundreds of years ago Arab sailors began to explore the east coast of Africa, being driven southwards in their sailing vessels by the northerly winds or monsoons of one part of the year and returning to their homes by the help of the southerly winds of the other half of the year. As trade with the coast grew, Persians and Arabs founded settlements on the coast, and the numerous islands and towns and kingdoms grew up. These original settlers mixed with the black races of the interior, and it is from this mixture that the people now called Swahili have sprung. The word Swahili, or Sawaheli, comes from the Arabic word Sawahil, meaning coast, and hence the east coast of Africa. A language derived partly from Arabic and partly from several African Bantu tongues came into being. This is called Kisawaheli, or the Swahili language, and different dialects of it are spoken practically the whole length of the East African coast and the islands close to it. The stories which follow are drawn from a number heard at different times and in different places, and they have been written down as nearly as possible as told by the Swahili himself. Some were told by story-tellers in the coast towns, others were overheard on the march in the interior or round the camp-fire at night. These stories have not been kept in any book or written document, but have been repeated from mouth to mouth, perhaps for hundreds of years. Either they arc narratedby a professional story-teller of a coast town, who hands on his stock of them to his son after him, or they are told by mothers to their children almost from the time they can toddle. These children, when they grow up, tell them, in their turn, to theirchildren, but the story is always told in the evening. During the day-time there is work to do and no good woman has time to waste in idleness. She must go out into the fields with her baby strapped on her back and hoe andweed the crops in the hot sun, she must grind the maize or millet into flour between two stones, winnow the grain, cook her husbands dinner, draw the water, collect firewood, and perform many other duties. When the days work is done and the evening meal is finished sit they round the fire outside the hut, for they have no lamps or even electric light. Perhaps they sit in a little courtyard, surrounded by a high palisade, for fear of the lions, or perhaps, no lions having been heard of late, they sit in the cleared space in the centre of the village, each its little family by fire. Then the mother tell her stories to the children, who soon get to know them all by heart, yet never tire of hearing them again and again. Tell us, mother, the story of Nunda, so that we may join in the chorus Siye mwanangu siye, siye Nunda mlawatu. It is not he, my child, not Nunda the eater of folk. Or it may be on a journey after a long and tiring days march, the evening meal is cooked and eaten, and- then the tired porters lie round the camp-fire and call on one of their number to tell a story, So that we may forget the toil of the day. As the Swahili is himself a mixture of the Arab and the African, so his stories form a curious combination of the elements of both races... FOREWORD MANY hundreds of years ago Arab sailors began to explore the east coast of Africa, being driven southwards in their sailing vessels by the northerly winds or monsoons of one part of the year and returning to their homes by the help of the southerly winds of the other half of the year. As trade with the coast grew, Persians and Arabs founded settlements on the coast, and the numerous islands and towns and kingdoms grew up. These original settlers mixed with the black races of the interior, and it is from this mixture that the people now called Swahili have sprung. The word Swahili, or Sawaheli, comes from the Arabic word Sawahil, meaning coast, and hence the east coast of Africa. A language derived partly from Arabic and partly from several African Bantu tongues came into being. This is called Kisawaheli, or the Swahili language, and different dialects of it are spoken practically the whole length of the East African coast and the islands close to it. The stories which follow are drawn from a number heard at different times and in different places, and they have been written down as nearly as possible as told by the Swahili himself. Some were told by story-tellers in the coast towns, others were overheard on the march in the interior or round the camp-fire at night. These stories have not been kept in any book or written document, but have been repeated from mouth to mouth, perhaps for hundreds of years. Either they arc narratedby a professional story-teller of a coast town, who hands on his stock of them to his son after him, or they are told by mothers to their children almost from the time they can toddle. These children, when they grow up, tell them, in their turn, to theirchildren, but the story is always told in the evening. During the day-time there is work to do and no good woman has time to waste in idleness. She must go out into the fields with her baby strapped on her back and hoe andweed the crops in the hot sun, she must grind the maize or millet into flour between two stones, winnow the grain, cook her husbands dinner, draw the water, collect firewood, and perform many other duties. When the days work is done and the evening meal is finished sit they round the fire outside the hut, for they have no lamps or even electric light. Perhaps they sit in a little courtyard, surrounded by a high palisade, for fear of the lions, or perhaps, no lions having been heard of late, they sit in the cleared space in the centre of the village, each its little family by fire. Then the mother tell her stories to the children, who soon get to know them all by heart, yet never tire of hearing them again and again. Tell us, mother, the story of Nunda, so that we may join in the chorus Siye mwanangu siye, siye Nunda mlawatu. It is not he, my child, not Nunda the eater of folk. Or it may be on a journey after a long and tiring days march, the evening meal is cooked and eaten, and- then the tired porters lie round the camp-fire and call on one of their number to tell a story, So that we may forget the toil of the day. As the Swahili is himself a mixture of the Arab and the African, so his stories form a curious combination of the elements of both races...

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Black Tales For White Children (Paperback) - C. H. Stigand
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C. H. Stigand:

Black Tales For White Children (Paperback) - Taschenbuch

2007, ISBN: 1406723479

ID: 2688911898

[EAN: 9781406723472], Neubuch, [PU: Read Books, United Kingdom], Fiction|Action & Adventure|General, Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****.FOREWORD MANY hundreds of years ago Arab sailors began to explore the east coast of Africa, being driven southwards in their sailing vessels by the northerly winds or monsoons of one part of the year and returning to their homes by the help of the southerly winds of the other half of the year. As trade with the coast grew, Persians and Arabs founded settlements on the coast, and the numerous islands and towns and kingdoms grew up. These original settlers mixed with the black races of the interior, and it is from this mixture that the people now called Swahili have sprung. The word Swahili, or Sawaheli, comes from the Arabic word Sawahil, meaning coast, and hence the east coast of Africa. A language derived partly from Arabic and partly from several African Bantu tongues came into being. This is called Kisawaheli, or the Swahili language, and different dialects of it are spoken practically the whole length of the East African coast and the islands close to it. The stories which follow are drawn from a number heard at different times and in different places, and they have been written down as nearly as possible as told by the Swahili himself. Some were told by story-tellers in the coast towns, others were overheard on the march in the interior or round the camp-fire at night. These stories have not been kept in any book or written document, but have been repeated from mouth to mouth, perhaps for hundreds of years. Either they arc narratedby a professional story-teller of a coast town, who hands on his stock of them to his son after him, or they are told by mothers to their children almost from the time they can toddle. These children, when they grow up, tell them, in their turn, to theirchildren, but the story is always told in the evening. During the day-time there is work to do and no good woman has time to waste in idleness. She must go out into the fields with her baby strapped on her back and hoe andweed the crops in the hot sun, she must grind the maize or millet into flour between two stones, winnow the grain, cook her husbands dinner, draw the water, collect firewood, and perform many other duties. When the days work is done and the evening meal is finished sit they round the fire outside the hut, for they have no lamps or even electric light. Perhaps they sit in a little courtyard, surrounded by a high palisade, for fear of the lions, or perhaps, no lions having been heard of late, they sit in the cleared space in the centre of the village, each its little family by fire. Then the mother tell her stories to the children, who soon get to know them all by heart, yet never tire of hearing them again and again. Tell us, mother, the story of Nunda, so that we may join in the chorus Siye mwanangu siye, siye Nunda mlawatu. It is not he, my child, not Nunda the eater of folk. Or it may be on a journey after a long and tiring days march, the evening meal is cooked and eaten, and- then the tired porters lie round the camp-fire and call on one of their number to tell a story, So that we may forget the toil of the day. As the Swahili is himself a mixture of the Arab and the African, so his stories form a curious combination of the elements of both races.

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Black Tales for White Children - C. H. Stigand
Vergriffenes Buch, derzeit bei uns nicht verfügbar.
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C. H. Stigand:
Black Tales for White Children - Taschenbuch

2007

ISBN: 1406723479

ID: 1320948350

[EAN: 9781406723472], Neubuch, Fiction|Action & Adventure|General, Print on Demand. FOREWORD MANY hundreds of years ago Arab sailors began to explore the east coast of Africa, being driven southwards in their sailing vessels by the northerly winds or monsoons of one part of the year and returning to their homes by the help of the southerly winds of the other half of the year. As trade with the coast grew, Persians and Arabs founded settlements on the coast, and the numerous islands and towns and kingdoms grew up. These original settlers mixed with the black races of the interior, and it is from this mixture that the people now called Swahili have sprung. The word Swahili, or Sawaheli, comes from the Arabic word Sawahil, meaning coast, and hence the east coast of Africa. A language derived partly from Arabic and partly from several African Bantu tongues came into being. This is called Kisawaheli, or the Swahili language, and different dialects of it are spoken practically the whole length of the East African coast and the islands close to it. The stories which follow are drawn from a number heard at different times and in different places, and they have been written down as nearly as possible as told by the Swahili himself. Some were told by story-tellers in the coast towns, others were overheard on the march in the interior or round the camp-fire at night. These stories have not been kept in any book or written document, but have been repeated from mouth to mouth, perhaps for hundreds of years. Either they arc narratedby a professional story-teller of a coast town, who hands on his stock of them to his son after him, or they are told by mothers to their children almost from the time they can toddle. These children, when they grow up, tell them, in their turn, to theirchildren, but the story is always told in the evening. During the day-time there is work to do and no good woman has time to waste in idleness. She must go out into the fields with her baby strapped on her back and hoe andweed the crops in the hot sun, she must grind the maize or millet into flour between two stones, winnow the grain, cook her husbands dinner, draw the water, collect firewood, and perform many other duties. When the days work is done and the evening meal is finished sit they round the fire outside the hut, for they have no lamps or even electric light. Perhaps they sit in a little courtyard, surrounded by a high palisade, for fear of the lions, or perhaps, no lions having been heard of late, they sit in the cleared space in the centre of the village, each its little family by fire. Then the mother tell her stories to the children, who soon get to know them all by heart, yet never tire of hearing them again and again. Tell us, mother, the story of Nunda, so that we may join in the chorus Siye mwanangu siye, siye Nunda mlawatu. It is not he, my child, not Nunda the eater of folk. Or it may be on a journey after a long and tiring days march, the evening meal is cooked and eaten, and- then the tired porters lie round the camp-fire and call on one of their number to tell a story, So that we may forget the toil of the day. As the Swahili is himself a mixture of the Arab and the African, so his stories form a curious combination of the elements of both races. 212 pages.

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Black Tales for White Children - C. H. Stigand
Vergriffenes Buch, derzeit bei uns nicht verfügbar.
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C. H. Stigand:
Black Tales for White Children - Taschenbuch

2007, ISBN: 1406723479

ID: 1150373234

[EAN: 9781406723472], Neubuch, Fiction|Action & Adventure|General, Print on Demand. FOREWORD MANY hundreds of years ago Arab sailors began to explore the east coast of Africa, being driven southwards in their sailing vessels by the northerly winds or monsoons of one part of the year and returning to their homes by the help of the southerly winds of the other half of the year. As trade with the coast grew, Persians and Arabs founded settlements on the coast, and the numerous islands and towns and kingdoms grew up. These original settlers mixed with the black races of the interior, and it is from this mixture that the people now called Swahili have sprung. The word Swahili, or Sawaheli, comes from the Arabic word Sawahil, meaning coast, and hence the east coast of Africa. A language derived partly from Arabic and partly from several African Bantu tongues came into being. This is called Kisawaheli, or the Swahili language, and different dialects of it are spoken practically the whole length of the East African coast and the islands close to it. The stories which follow are drawn from a number heard at different times and in different places, and they have been written down as nearly as possible as told by the Swahili himself. Some were told by story-tellers in the coast towns, others were overheard on the march in the interior or round the camp-fire at night. These stories have not been kept in any book or written document, but have been repeated from mouth to mouth, perhaps for hundreds of years. Either they arc narratedby a professional story-teller of a coast town, who hands on his stock of them to his son after him, or they are told by mothers to their children almost from the time they can toddle. These children, when they grow up, tell them, in their turn, to theirchildren, but the story is always told in the evening. During the day-time there is work to do and no good woman has time to waste in idleness. She must go out into the fields with her baby strapped on her back and hoe andweed the crops in the hot sun, she must grind the maize or millet into flour between two stones, winnow the grain, cook her husbands dinner, draw the water, collect firewood, and perform many other duties. When the days work is done and the evening meal is finished sit they round the fire outside the hut, for they have no lamps or even electric light. Perhaps they sit in a little courtyard, surrounded by a high palisade, for fear of the lions, or perhaps, no lions having been heard of late, they sit in the cleared space in the centre of the village, each its little family by fire. Then the mother tell her stories to the children, who soon get to know them all by heart, yet never tire of hearing them again and again. Tell us, mother, the story of Nunda, so that we may join in the chorus Siye mwanangu siye, siye Nunda mlawatu. It is not he, my child, not Nunda the eater of folk. Or it may be on a journey after a long and tiring days march, the evening meal is cooked and eaten, and- then the tired porters lie round the camp-fire and call on one of their number to tell a story, So that we may forget the toil of the day. As the Swahili is himself a mixture of the Arab and the African, so his stories form a curious combination of the elements of both races. 212 pages.

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Black Tales for White Children
Autor:

Stigand, C. H.

Titel:

Black Tales for White Children

ISBN-Nummer:

1406723479

FOREWORD MANY hundreds of years ago Arab sailors began to explore the east coast of Africa, being driven southwards in their sailing vessels by the northerly winds or monsoons of one part of the year and returning to their homes by the help of the southerly winds of the other half of the year. As trade with the coast grew, Persians and Arabs founded settlements on the coast, and the numerous islands and towns and kingdoms grew up. These original settlers mixed with the black races of the interior, and it is from this mixture that the people now called Swahili have sprung. The word Swahili, or Sawaheli, comes from the Arabic word Sawahil, meaning coast, and hence the east coast of Africa. A language derived partly from Arabic and partly from several African Bantu tongues came into being. This is called Kisawaheli, or the Swahili language, and different dialects of it are spoken practically the whole length of the East African coast and the islands close to it. The stories which follow are drawn from a number heard at different times and in different places, and they have been written down as nearly as possible as told by the Swahili himself. Some were told by story-tellers in the coast towns, others were overheard on the march in the interior or round the camp-fire at night. These stories have not been kept in any book or written document, but have been repeated from mouth to mouth, perhaps for hundreds of years. Either they arc narratedby a professional story-teller of a coast town, who hands on his stock of them to his son after him, or they are told by mothers to their children almost from the time they can toddle. These children, when they grow up, tell them, in their turn, to theirchildren, but the story is always told in the evening. During the day-time there is work to do and no good woman has time to waste in idleness. She must go out into the fields with her baby strapped on her back and hoe andweed the crops in the hot sun, she must grind the maize or millet into flour between two stones, winnow the grain, cook her husbands dinner, draw the water, collect firewood, and perform many other duties. When the days work is done and the evening meal is finished sit they round the fire outside the hut, for they have no lamps or even electric light. Perhaps they sit in a little courtyard, surrounded by a high palisade, for fear of the lions, or perhaps, no lions having been heard of late, they sit in the cleared space in the centre of the village, each its little family by fire. Then the mother tell her stories to the children, who soon get to know them all by heart, yet never tire of hearing them again and again. Tell us, mother, the story of Nunda, so that we may join in the chorus Siye mwanangu siye, siye Nunda mlawatu. It is not he, my child, not Nunda the eater of folk. Or it may be on a journey after a long and tiring days march, the evening meal is cooked and eaten, and- then the tired porters lie round the camp-fire and call on one of their number to tell a story, So that we may forget the toil of the day. As the Swahili is himself a mixture of the Arab and the African, so his stories form a curious combination of the elements of both races...

Detailangaben zum Buch - Black Tales for White Children


EAN (ISBN-13): 9781406723472
ISBN (ISBN-10): 1406723479
Taschenbuch
Erscheinungsjahr: 2007
Herausgeber: DODO PR
212 Seiten
Gewicht: 0,272 kg
Sprache: eng/Englisch

Buch in der Datenbank seit 09.11.2007 17:00:53
Buch zuletzt gefunden am 13.07.2015 16:19:43
ISBN/EAN: 1406723479

ISBN - alternative Schreibweisen:
1-4067-2347-9, 978-1-4067-2347-2

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