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Baseball Before We Knew It: A Search For The Roots Of The Game - BLOCK, DAVID; WILES, TIM (FOREWORD)
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BLOCK, DAVID; WILES, TIM (FOREWORD):

Baseball Before We Knew It: A Search For The Roots Of The Game - signiertes Exemplar

2012, ISBN: 9780803262553

Taschenbuch, Gebundene Ausgabe, ID: 841109628

Vij Books India Private Limited, 2012. Hardcover. New. The Maoists have taken up arms. Their focus is on tribals and lower caste people for support. Stress is on militarisation with hierarchy and building of ‘People’s Guerrilla Army’ capable of destroying the state machinery. Violence and breakdown of law and order is causing loss of innocent lives and damage to property. The book has been covered in five chapters by the contributors. The first chapter deals with the Maoist insurgency in India and analyses the reasons that led to the Communist Party of India (CPI) taking up the cause of the lower castes and scheduled tribes. The second chapter deals with use of air power in combating the Maoist insurgency. The author has suggested deployment of drones to detect insurgent camps in the forests and use of helicopters for evacuation of casualties and other measures to facilitate logistics support for Countering Insurgency. An appraisal of India’s Intelligence agencies has been covered in Chapter Three. The fourth and fifth chapters are concerning the manner in which the United States has reacted after the 9/11 terrorist attack in the USA and how India reacted after the terrorist attack in Mumbai on 26 November 2008. The author has suggested the need to evolve a Comprehensive Internal Security Policy covering all dimensions and all levels -- political, economic and social., Vij Books India Private Limited, 2012, Vij Books India Private Limited, 2012. Hardcover. New. The Maoists have taken up arms. Their focus is on tribals and lower caste people for support. Stress is on militarisation with hierarchy and building of ‘People’s Guerrilla Army’ capable of destroying the state machinery. Violence and breakdown of law and order is causing loss of innocent lives and damage to property. The book has been covered in five chapters by the contributors. The first chapter deals with the Maoist insurgency in India and analyses the reasons that led to the Communist Party of India (CPI) taking up the cause of the lower castes and scheduled tribes. The second chapter deals with use of air power in combating the Maoist insurgency. The author has suggested deployment of drones to detect insurgent camps in the forests and use of helicopters for evacuation of casualties and other measures to facilitate logistics support for Countering Insurgency. An appraisal of India’s Intelligence agencies has been covered in Chapter Three. The fourth and fifth chapters are concerning the manner in which the United States has reacted after the 9/11 terrorist attack in the USA and how India reacted after the terrorist attack in Mumbai on 26 November 2008. The author has suggested the need to evolve a Comprehensive Internal Security Policy covering all dimensions and all levels -- political, economic and social., Vij Books India Private Limited, 2012, Garden City, New York: Nelson Doubleday, Inc., 1982. By WALTER KERR Published: September 13, 1981, Sunday The world changes, behavior patterns change, I suppose even styles in bicycles follow mysterious shifts of fashion. (I don't have a bicycle, so cannot be dogmatic about the matter, but there are three bicycles on stage in the popular Off Broadway play called ''Key Exchange,'' and they don't look exactly like the ones my kids used to ride.) There is one thing, however, that seems not to change. It's the look of pain on the face of the guy who's happily adapted himself to all the life-style innovations that have come his way - particularly those connected with sex -and still hasn't been able to put together a world he can manage. Perhaps that's not pain on his face, just bafflement. Or maybe egg. Whatever it is, it's a funny look -and a touching one, too. It crops up more often than I expected in Kevin Wade's small, smart, mostly sunny ''Key Exchange,'' which opened while I was vacationing, was very well received, and is still eavesdropping on its biking trio (brightly striped sweaters, visored caps worn backwards) at the downtown Orpheum. To recap briefly, two boys and a girl spend their Sundays (and one offbeat Saturday) circling Central Park. One of the boys (Mark Blum) reports that he's just got married though his companions can't honestly detect any real change in him, possibly because he and his new bride had been living together for quite some time beforehand. The other boy (Ben Masters) is trying to decide whether or not to exchange keys with his constant date (Brooke Adams). Flippant boy-girl establishment of premise: ''If we exchange keys, can I sneak into your bed in the middle of the night?'' (Girl nods) ''Can I bring my pals?'' ''No more than five.'' There is a reason for this apparently playful but quite carefully calculated banter. Mr. Masters is inordinately fearful that some casual-seeming step in his relationship with Miss Adams - the weekend outings, the carefree bedding-down, the proposed exchange of apartment keys -will commit him to something. And he knows what he means by ''something.'' Sooner or later, unless he keeps his wits about him, he'll be roped and hogtied and tugged right back into the obligations, the proprieties, the imprisonment that his lucky generation has escaped. No matter how liberated a girl may be, there's still a gleam behind the gleam in her eyes that spells marriage. Thus, when Miss Adams suggests, in all innocence if there is such a thing as female innocence, that the two of them have dinner with her father at Tavern on the Green, Mr. Masters is quick to slip from the snare. Eye to eye with her father, he points out, ''we'd both know what was going on.'' Obviously this would make him uneasy, and feeling uneasy could lead to his doing something rash. No din ners with fathers, anywhere. A fellow can survive this sort of ploy. What suddenly gives Mr. Masters the true roaring horrors, what paints a look of unadulterated terror on his face, is a discovery over which he can really exercise no control. He learns, shatteringly, that for quite some time Miss Adams has been seeing no one else. No other boy, or boys. He has been her exclusive date and bedmate, without knowing it. The sense of entrapment, of black betrayal, that comes with the horrified arch of Mr. Masters's eyebrows and the almost corklike pop of his eyes is splendid comedy and stiletto-like comment in the same gasping breath. His strangled question, ''For how long?,'' is the question of a doomed man organizing his obituary. And the moment is funnythorny for the pretty Miss Adams as well. It would seem that the girl in the case has got to sleep with someone else if she wishes to continue sleeping with the fellow she likes. (''Loves'' may be a taboo word here; perhaps ''likes best'' wouldn't seem so threatening.) In any event, the new freedoms have their points. Some of them are sharp. Mr. Blum, the remaining weekender, is even more affecting after he's been suitably funny by way of introduction. Not too many Sundays have passed before we (and his two friends) learn that his wife has left him for a composer. We never see his wife in the play, but we do get to know her. Mr. Blum looks like a spaniel who's simultaneously happy you've just come home to him and still worried that you mightn't have, but playwright Wade has made him a most articulate - sometimes almost poetic -sort of spaniel. The actor's handling of a passage in which he describes his wife's parting speech, a speech that begins with ''It's nothing you've done'' and compounds its soothing rationalizations from there, is, I think we may safely say, masterly. He tries so very hard to be fair to the woman dispensing cliches, retracing her inflections with his own yearning for her intact, that the missing woman becomes as real as his comic melancholy. At one point Mr. Blum remembers himself ''conjuring up a flood of images'' brought on by the sight of a girl he doesn't know. And the images are there, thoughtfully provided by author Wade, tumbling on top of one another and then holding firm to make a kind of verbal pyramid, a hilltop of vivid metaphor. The performer reads it pe rfectly. But then he handles all such set p ieces well: an account of zooming out of Central Park with his head down over the handlebarsuntil, after shaking off his preoccupations a nd at last looking up, he discovers himself in Westchester; and an o nly mildly embarrassed refusal to join his friends for the evening b ecause it might, after all, be the night his wife decides to come ba ck. As for Miss Adams, gamely making the best of what may be a no-win situation, she's nicely independent offering to take her boy to the movies provided she can pick the movie, she's enormously cooperative when his tensions reach the point where he could well use a rubdown, and I thought she was eminently reasonable making the small social request ''Can't you lie once in awhile?'' ''Key Exchange'' is sliver-slight; it's also, in some curious way, lyric. When playwright Wade was interviewed by Douglas McGill for these columns just a few weeks ago, he insisted that he hadn't been struggling for anything significant, he'd just tried to jot down a few reasonably accurate echoes of the life around him that might give some pleasure to his friends. Well, the pleasure's there. But I think he may have caught a soup,con of significance as well, by indirection, by keeping a casual eye on the rearview mirror. His play seems to be reminding us -with humor and sensibility both - that whatever the winds of change may have done to us lately, they haven't much altered our reflexes. We've still got to prowl and slug our way through those same old emotions. As the freest soul among the cyclists broods, there's ''all that negotiating and nuances and finesse'' to be got through, after all. Or, as his on-and-off married acquaintance reports in a line the author himself likes to quote, ''We tiptoe around the silences and the half-smiles.'' Freedoms are freedoms, all right. They just don't banish fears, worse luck. Some sunning on jacket, otherwise in very nice condition.. Book Club (BCE/BOMC). Hard Cover. Near Fine/Near Fine. Illus. by Some B/W Photos., Nelson Doubleday, Inc., 1982, New York: Grosset & Dunlap. Hardcover. Very good/very good. Hardcover. 7 5/8" X 5 1/8". 335pp. Mild chipping along edges and light soiling to dust jacket, encased in protective archival sleeve. Copyright page reads 1929 as date of publication, but dust jacket displays Jackie Cooper as Skippy of the Paramount picture by the same title (1931), suggesting a reprint of the 1929 edition. Light edgewear to green cloth hardcover, with black lettering and decorations to cover and spine. Vibrantly orange-stained top edge of text block. Bookseller notations pencilled to front free endpaper. Front hinge starting, but binding remains sound. Contents are clean and unmarked. Illustrated in black and white throughout by the author. From back cover: "Skippy's hilarious small-boy philosophy--his mirthful adventures in Shantytown--his first fights with the neighborhood sissy, and the town bully--and his mischievous exploits with his pal, 'Sooky'--all are included in 'Skippy.', Grosset & Dunlap, Small 8vo. Red cloth with pictorial black front cover stamping. 207pp, (5pp ads). Frontispiece, decorative endpapers. Very good. Mild edgewear; bit of "flecking" to cloth coating at outer edge of both boards; "This is my Book" plate on front flyleaf has been signed. 11th volume from the popular juvenile "Buddy Series." This publisher does not indicate edition reliably, but internal evidence suggests this is a later printing., Cupples & Leon Company, 1935, University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln and London: 2006. Softcover. Brand new book. It may be America's game, but no one seems to know how or when baseball really started. Theories abound, myths proliferate, but reliable information has been in short supplyÑuntil now, when Baseball before We Knew It brings fresh new evidence of baseball's origins into play. David Block looks into the early history of the game and of the 150-year-old debate about its beginnings. He tackles one stubborn misconception after another, debunking the enduring belief that baseball descended from the English game of rounders and revealing a surprising new explanation for the most notorious myth of all Ñ the Abner Doubleday - Cooperstown story. Block's book takes readers on an exhilarating journey through the centuries in search of clues to the evolution of our modern National Pastime. Among his startling discoveries is a set of long-forgotten baseball rules from the 1700s. Block evaluates the originality and historical significance of the Knickerbocker rules of 1845, revisits European studies on the ancestry of baseball which indicate that the game dates back hundreds, if not thousands of years, and assembles a detailed history of games and pastimes from the Middle Ages onward that contributed to baseball's development. In its thoroughness and reach, and its extensive descriptive bibliography of early baseball sources, this book is a unique and invaluable resourceÑa comprehensive, reliable, and readable account of baseball before it was America's game. David Block is a long-time collector of early baseball books and memorabilia, and is a passionate, lifelong fan of the game and its history. "Given North American baseball fans' nearly inexhaustible appetite for the arcana of their favourite sport, astonishingly few scholars have ever undertaken the detailed historical and anthropological research to find out where the game actually began. . . . Now, through painstaking bibliographic and archival research, on display in his extensive appendices, Block has established . . . the true forerunner of American baseball. . . . By pushing beyond baseball's reputed origins in an English children's game, David Block has discovered the game's true origins in an even older English game."ÑWarren Goldstein, Times Literary Supplement. "The suggestion that America's Game might have originated somewhere besides America so 'inflamed passions and patriotism,' writes David Block, that the idea still burns us. . . . Block has produced a deliciously researched feast that lays this controversy to rest. . . . Block has assembled such a rich pile of evidence for the game's European origins that one might wonder why there ever was a controversy. . . . Once an American reader gets past the disappointment of discovering baseball's deep European roots, Block's book is a perfect delight. He has unearthed magnificent medieval manuscripts . . . That show that baseball is just the latest in a very long line of stick-and-ball games."ÑCharles Hirshberg, Sports Illustrated "As if this country doesn't have enough to worry about, it turns out America's national pastime may not even be American. At least according to Baseball before We Knew It, a new book by David Block. Block contends the origins of the game date to the mid-14th century and can be traced to northern Europe and parts of Africa. Hold on there, pal. What about good old Abner Doubleday? 'There's no evidence he even played baseball,' Block says. 'It's simply a case of people passing down stories that have never been substantiated.' Now, there's something we seem to be very good at." ÑMorty Ain, ESPN: The Magazine ISBN: 0803262558., University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln and London: 2006

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Baseball Before We Knew It: A Search For The Roots Of The Game - BLOCK, DAVID; WILES, TIM (FOREWORD)
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2012, ISBN: 9780803262553

ID: 587164530

W. W. Norton & Company. Paperback. New. Paperback. 224 pages. Dimensions: 7.5in. x 4.9in. x 0.6in.A deeply courageous account of Hogans personal and tribal history. . . staggering. Pam Houston, O Magazine I sat down to write a book about pain and ended up writing about love, says award-winning Chickasaw poet and novelist Linda Hogan. In this book, she recounts her difficult childhood as the daughter of an army sergeant, her love affair at age fifteen with an older man, the legacy of alcoholism, the troubled history of her adopted daughters, and her own physical struggles since a recent horse accident. She shows how historic and emotional pain are passed down through generations, blending personal history with stories of important Indian figures of the past such as Lozen, the woman who was the military strategist for Geronimo, and Ohiesha, the Santee Sioux medical doctor who witnessed the massacre at Wounded Knee. Ultimately, Hogan sees herself and her people whole again and gives an illuminating story of personal triumph. This wise and compassionate offering deserves to be widely read. Publishers Weekly, starred review This item ships from multiple locations. Your book may arrive from Roseburg,OR, La Vergne,TN, Momence,IL, Commerce,GA., W. W. Norton & Company, John Wiley & Sons. Paperback. New. Paperback. 224 pages. Dimensions: 8.9in. x 5.9in. x 0.7in.Napoleon Hills Golden Rules: The Lost Writings consists of a series of magazine articles Napoleon Hill wrote between 1919 and1923 for Success Magazine, of which he eventually become an editor. Hills obsession with achieving material success had led him from poverty stricken Appalachian Mountains with the desire to study successful people. These articles focus on Hills philosophy of success, drawing on the thoughts and experience of a multitude of rags-to-riches tycoons, showing readers how these successful people achieved such status. Many of his writings such as the chapter on Law of Attraction, written in the March 1919 issue, have recently basis of several bestselling books. Readers will discover principles that will assure their success if studied and put into action. Chapters include: Lesson 1: Your Social and Physical Heredity--Hills Golden Rule (May 1920) Lesson 2: Auto Suggestion--Napoleon Hills Magazine (July 1921) Lesson 3: Suggestion (Applied Salesmanship)--Napoleon Hills Magazine (August 1921) Lesson 4: The Law of Retaliation--Hills Golden Rule (March 1919) Lesson 5: The Power of Your Mind (Little Odd Visits with Your Editor)--Hills Golden Rule (October 1919) Lesson 6: How to Build Self-Confidence--Napoleon Hills Magazine (June 1921) Lesson 7: Environment and Habit--Hills Golden Rule (April 1919) Lesson 8: How to Remember--Hills Golden Rule (May-June 1919) Lesson 9: How Marc Antony Used Suggestion in Winning the Roman Mob--Hills Golden Rule (July 1919) Lesson 10: Persuasion vs. Force--Hills Golden Rule (September 1919) Lesson 11: The Law of Compensation--Napoleon Hills Magazine (April 1921) Lesson 12: The Golden Rule as a Pass Key to All Achievement--Napoleon Hills Magazine (June 1921) This item ships from multiple locations. Your book may arrive from Roseburg,OR, La Vergne,TN, Momence,IL, Commerce,GA., John Wiley & Sons, No binding. New. Kindle Edition. 64 pages. Harlan Ford was the first person to pour plaster castings of tracks and report a sighting to the media of an unknown creature known worldwide as the legendary Honey Island Swamp Monster. Harlan Ford was my grandfather. While recently moving everything from the Ford home after it was sold, we came across a letter that Harlan Ford wrote in the 1970s to the Argosy Magazine about his encounter with the Honey Island Swamp Monster. Im not sure if the letter was ever published. After Harlan Ford passed away in 1980, his story of the Honey Island Swamp Monster has been told and retold by many people. As we all know when things are retold so many times, certain details change, get exaggerated, maybe by accident, maybe on purpose. Some people try to say his story was a hoax after a local hunter found a track glued on the bottom of a shoe. But luckily Fords encounters were documented in his own words in the letter. I inserted Harlan Fords actual letter that he typed in this book. There are also documented sightings from more recent eye-witnesses. Dana Holyfield - Evans has authored several books and produced several documentary films, including The Legend of the Honey Island Swamp Monster. She has made special appearances on TV shows such as; Swamp People, Hannitys America for Fox News, Fact or Faked, Mysteries at the Museum, Monsters and Mysteries, and American Monsters, and Swamp Monsters. Scenes from her documentary film was featured in Lost Tapes on Animal Planet. Dana was invited to speak at the Creature Weekend 2012 conference in Salt Fork State Park in Ohio. She continues research to document sightings on the Honey Island Swamp Monster. She is currently working on a new docu-drama about the Honey Island Swamp Monster. This item ships from multiple locations. Your book may arrive from Roseburg,OR, La Vergne,TN., University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln and London: 2006. Softcover. Brand new book. It may be America's game, but no one seems to know how or when baseball really started. Theories abound, myths proliferate, but reliable information has been in short supplyÑuntil now, when Baseball before We Knew It brings fresh new evidence of baseball's origins into play. David Block looks into the early history of the game and of the 150-year-old debate about its beginnings. He tackles one stubborn misconception after another, debunking the enduring belief that baseball descended from the English game of rounders and revealing a surprising new explanation for the most notorious myth of all Ñ the Abner Doubleday - Cooperstown story. Block's book takes readers on an exhilarating journey through the centuries in search of clues to the evolution of our modern National Pastime. Among his startling discoveries is a set of long-forgotten baseball rules from the 1700s. Block evaluates the originality and historical significance of the Knickerbocker rules of 1845, revisits European studies on the ancestry of baseball which indicate that the game dates back hundreds, if not thousands of years, and assembles a detailed history of games and pastimes from the Middle Ages onward that contributed to baseball's development. In its thoroughness and reach, and its extensive descriptive bibliography of early baseball sources, this book is a unique and invaluable resourceÑa comprehensive, reliable, and readable account of baseball before it was America's game. David Block is a long-time collector of early baseball books and memorabilia, and is a passionate, lifelong fan of the game and its history. "Given North American baseball fans' nearly inexhaustible appetite for the arcana of their favourite sport, astonishingly few scholars have ever undertaken the detailed historical and anthropological research to find out where the game actually began. . . . Now, through painstaking bibliographic and archival research, on display in his extensive appendices, Block has established . . . the true forerunner of American baseball. . . . By pushing beyond baseball's reputed origins in an English children's game, David Block has discovered the game's true origins in an even older English game."ÑWarren Goldstein, Times Literary Supplement. "The suggestion that America's Game might have originated somewhere besides America so 'inflamed passions and patriotism,' writes David Block, that the idea still burns us. . . . Block has produced a deliciously researched feast that lays this controversy to rest. . . . Block has assembled such a rich pile of evidence for the game's European origins that one might wonder why there ever was a controversy. . . . Once an American reader gets past the disappointment of discovering baseball's deep European roots, Block's book is a perfect delight. He has unearthed magnificent medieval manuscripts . . . That show that baseball is just the latest in a very long line of stick-and-ball games."ÑCharles Hirshberg, Sports Illustrated "As if this country doesn't have enough to worry about, it turns out America's national pastime may not even be American. At least according to Baseball before We Knew It, a new book by David Block. Block contends the origins of the game date to the mid-14th century and can be traced to northern Europe and parts of Africa. Hold on there, pal. What about good old Abner Doubleday? 'There's no evidence he even played baseball,' Block says. 'It's simply a case of people passing down stories that have never been substantiated.' Now, there's something we seem to be very good at." ÑMorty Ain, ESPN: The Magazine ISBN: 0803262558., University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln and London: 2006

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Baseball Before We Knew It: A Search For The Roots Of The Game - BLOCK, DAVID; WILES, TIM (FOREWORD)
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BLOCK, DAVID; WILES, TIM (FOREWORD):
Baseball Before We Knew It: A Search For The Roots Of The Game - Taschenbuch

2006

ISBN: 9780803262553

ID: 196038416

University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln and London: 2006. Softcover. Brand new book. It may be America's game, but no one seems to know how or when baseball really started. Theories abound, myths proliferate, but reliable information has been in short supplyÑuntil now, when Baseball before We Knew It brings fresh new evidence of baseball's origins into play. David Block looks into the early history of the game and of the 150-year-old debate about its beginnings. He tackles one stubborn misconception after another, debunking the enduring belief that baseball descended from the English game of rounders and revealing a surprising new explanation for the most notorious myth of all Ñ the Abner Doubleday - Cooperstown story. Block's book takes readers on an exhilarating journey through the centuries in search of clues to the evolution of our modern National Pastime. Among his startling discoveries is a set of long-forgotten baseball rules from the 1700s. Block evaluates the originality and historical significance of the Knickerbocker rules of 1845, revisits European studies on the ancestry of baseball which indicate that the game dates back hundreds, if not thousands of years, and assembles a detailed history of games and pastimes from the Middle Ages onward that contributed to baseball's development. In its thoroughness and reach, and its extensive descriptive bibliography of early baseball sources, this book is a unique and invaluable resourceÑa comprehensive, reliable, and readable account of baseball before it was America's game. David Block is a long-time collector of early baseball books and memorabilia, and is a passionate, lifelong fan of the game and its history. "Given North American baseball fans' nearly inexhaustible appetite for the arcana of their favourite sport, astonishingly few scholars have ever undertaken the detailed historical and anthropological research to find out where the game actually began. . . . Now, through painstaking bibliographic and archival research, on display in his extensive appendices, Block has established . . . the true forerunner of American baseball. . . . By pushing beyond baseball's reputed origins in an English children's game, David Block has discovered the game's true origins in an even older English game."ÑWarren Goldstein, Times Literary Supplement. "The suggestion that America's Game might have originated somewhere besides America so 'inflamed passions and patriotism,' writes David Block, that the idea still burns us. . . . Block has produced a deliciously researched feast that lays this controversy to rest. . . . Block has assembled such a rich pile of evidence for the game's European origins that one might wonder why there ever was a controversy. . . . Once an American reader gets past the disappointment of discovering baseball's deep European roots, Block's book is a perfect delight. He has unearthed magnificent medieval manuscripts . . . That show that baseball is just the latest in a very long line of stick-and-ball games."ÑCharles Hirshberg, Sports Illustrated "As if this country doesn't have enough to worry about, it turns out America's national pastime may not even be American. At least according to Baseball before We Knew It, a new book by David Block. Block contends the origins of the game date to the mid-14th century and can be traced to northern Europe and parts of Africa. Hold on there, pal. What about good old Abner Doubleday? 'There's no evidence he even played baseball,' Block says. 'It's simply a case of people passing down stories that have never been substantiated.' Now, there's something we seem to be very good at." ÑMorty Ain, ESPN: The Magazine ISBN: 0803262558., University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln and London: 2006

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ISBN: 9780803262553

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It may be America's game, but no one seems to know how or when baseball really started. Theories abound, myths proliferate, but reliable information has been in short supply-until now, when Baseball before We Knew It brings fresh new evidence of baseball's origins into play. David Block looks into the early history of the game and of the 150-year-old debate about its beginnings. He tackles one stubborn misconception after another, debunking the enduring belief that baseball descended from the It may be America's game, but no one seems to know how or when baseball really started. Theories abound, myths proliferate, but reliable information has been in short supply-until now, when Baseball before We Knew It brings fresh new evidence of baseball's origins into play. David Block looks into the early history of the game and of the 150-year-old debate about its beginnings. He tackles one stubborn misconception after another, debunking the enduring belief that baseball descended from the English game of rounders and revealing a surprising new explanation for the most notorious myth of all-the Abner Doubleday-Cooperstown story. Block's book takes readers on an exhilarating journey through the centuries in search of clues to the evolution of our modern National Pastime. Among his startling discoveries is a set of long-forgotten baseball rules from the 1700s. Block evaluates the originality and historical significance of the Knickerbocker rules of 1845, revisits European studies on the ancestry of baseball which indicate that the game dates back hundreds, if not thousands of years, and assembles a detailed history of games and pastimes from the Middle Ages onward that contributed to baseball's development. In its thoroughness and reach, and its extensive descriptive bibliography of early baseball sources, this book is a unique and invaluable resource-a comprehensive, reliable, and readable account of baseball before it was America's game. David Block is a long-time collector of early baseball books and memorabilia, and is a passionate, lifelong fan of the game and its history. Books, Sports & Recreation~~Baseball~~History, Baseball-before-We-Knew-It~~David-Block, 929249, Baseball before We Knew It: A Search for the Roots of the Game, David Block, Foreword by Tim Wiles, 0803262558, University of Nebraska Press, , , , , University of Nebraska Press

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Baseball Before We Knew It: A Search for the Roots of the Game
Autor:

Block, David

Titel:

Baseball Before We Knew It: A Search for the Roots of the Game

ISBN-Nummer:

0803262558

Detailangaben zum Buch - Baseball Before We Knew It: A Search for the Roots of the Game


EAN (ISBN-13): 9780803262553
ISBN (ISBN-10): 0803262558
Gebundene Ausgabe
Taschenbuch
Erscheinungsjahr: 2006
Herausgeber: UNIV OF NEBRASKA PR
340 Seiten
Gewicht: 0,440 kg
Sprache: eng/Englisch

Buch in der Datenbank seit 02.03.2007 01:51:16
Buch zuletzt gefunden am 24.01.2016 17:36:02
ISBN/EAN: 0803262558

ISBN - alternative Schreibweisen:
0-8032-6255-8, 978-0-8032-6255-3

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